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Improving case air circulation? (with pic)

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October 22, 2006 2:01:55 PM

Hello all - I built this system last month and recently added X1950 Crossfire to the system. The problem is that ever since I added crossfire, the heat in the whole system has gone up, unsurprisingly. The CPU (C2E X6800), with Zalman CNPS9500, hovers around 25-30C (Everest) and 40-45C (coretemp). However, Everest shows the GPUs running at very high temps even in idle. GPU1 (presumably the master card) runs at 70-75C idle and GPU2 at around 60C. When I play games such as GRAW or Oblivion, the GPUs run up in excess of 90C, even touching 100C! All my case fans (came with the case) are running noisily at High speed. I am trying to look for ways to improve air circulation in my Antec P180 case. The PSU is a 750W Silverstone.

The case as you can see is pretty cramped out, with wires everywhere, as the PSU is located at the bottom of the case. I've inserted the HDDs at the bottom right container of the case to reduce wire clutter in the middle of the case and to create an "air well" on the right side of the GPUs. As you can see there is a large 120mm fan blowing air into the case (right middle of the case) towards the GPUs. The container in the middle is empty, so there is an "air well". There are 2 other 120mm fans at the top left and top of the case, both blowing out of the case, with the Zalman fan also blowing air in the same direction, leftwards. Could any experts suggest further ways I can improve the air circulation in the case to reduce the heat on the GPUs? I'm not sure I can do more with the wire clutter given the way the case and mobo is laid out. Also not sure if I can fit a water cooling unit in there crowded as it is already. Any help greatly appreciated. Pic attached below.

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October 22, 2006 2:23:08 PM

I wonder if you can add in a PCI cooler.
I've heard mixed things about them, whether they are any good or not i'm not too sure but you can use it to add in another exhaust. though i think that they are quite noisey so be warned. though its worth a shot i suppose
a b B Homebuilt system
October 22, 2006 2:32:32 PM

It would take a little modding, but how about adding a fan to the side panel of the case centered directly over your video cards?
Related resources
October 22, 2006 3:07:27 PM

Um, Just get an Armour or Stacker...
That should fix the temp issues.
October 22, 2006 3:35:32 PM

personally, I would prefer the HDD fan to exhaust out, since the 2 video cards are blowing hot air toward the HDDs. Also, the air flow IN THE MIDDLE of the CPU heatsink with go toward the back case fan, it doesn't just stop there, so I would prefer the top fan blowing down onto the CPU heatsink :?


and I also agree with JITPublisher :p 
October 22, 2006 3:44:09 PM

Well your problem is air inlet flow. You are not getting enough "cool" air on the video cards themselves. Im not exactly familliar with the actual cooler airflow on the ATi cards themselves, but I used to have 2 6800GTs and they had the same problem you are having. I have an Antec Super Lan boy er what ever it is. and I had to put a fresh air 120mm fan to bring cool air into the case to aimed at the videocards. That helped tremendously. 15 deg C drop on the cards at load. But after I replaced my SLi with one 7900Gt all the temps dropped lol. but yea wither you need more air in towards the cards or being drawn directly from the cards to the outside.
October 22, 2006 3:53:37 PM

Well realize that Ati X18 series cards and higher tend to heat up a lot easier than the nvidia counterparts. The fans arent too great, and neither is the heat release. Your case looks very cramped i must say, and like burn said, maybe a PCI cooler could be the best and cheapest way to go, but it looks like you dont have room for much of anything else. If your really weiry on this, the last option would have to be, to replace the case. Now i dont have much background on the case Im going to link, but the 200cm outtake fan is phenominal, along with the 120mm outtake near the cpu, and 2 in the 5.25 Bays. Pretty kick ass i think, heres the link:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...

Good Luck. :D 
a b B Homebuilt system
October 22, 2006 4:06:44 PM

These video cards do exhaust hot air out the back of the case but still, the major cooling is accomplished on the bottom side of each card, which is where all the goodies are that make most of the heat.
But heat rises, and exceptionally good airflow over the "top" sides of the cards is important too.
That may be why the main card runs hotter, the heat rising from the second card below it is not being carried away fast enough, and its rising directly to the top card. Even though you have a fan blowing directly at them from the front, there has to be a place for the air to exit the area as fast as it's coming in, or not much cool air is going to come in! There is a dead space in between the 2 cards that is not getting good airflow in and out, IMHO.
Anonymous
a b B Homebuilt system
October 22, 2006 4:09:20 PM

I would do several things since this is a BTX system and BTX systems were made to have cool air come in from the front and hot air out the back and out the top:

1) I see that your third 5.25" bay is empty, correct? Why don't you add a quality 5.25" inch bay fan that is powerful enough to blow cool air on to the CPU. One that is powerful enough for you to feel the air. That way you have cool air coming in from the front at various levels and going out the back and out the top (since heat rises).

2) Put as large of a fan to the right of the video cards (when I say "to the right", I mean as looking at the picture. The fan would be a kind of booster to increase air flow across the cards.

3) Heat may be rising from your power supply so make sure there is a powerful fan in the power supply unit. I would make sure the power supply is vented on all sides. Is there a powerful fan that is in front of the power supply as well bringing cool air from the outside of the case on the front to the rear? This would be important.

4) Also, try adding another fan at the top of the case to bring more air out of the top.

5) Open up the rear of the case as much as possible to allow more hot air to escape instead of being forced to circulate.
October 22, 2006 4:26:38 PM

It appears that you have good airflow from the middle front (in) over the cpu/chipset and (out) through the upper back. It also appears that the videocards are thrashing heated air around in circles with little opportunity for escape. I assume that the cards DO NOT exhaust out the back using 2nd PCI slot vents. If this is the case, then:
A). Using a PCI vent fan AND slowing down your upper rear exhaust fans should allow better gpu cooling.
B). Using/fabricating a side INLET fan over the gpus would force more heated air away from the cards, moving it up and out the back and top exhaust vents.

If the videocards DO vent out the pci slots, then you need more inlet flow (either side vent or front) and less power on the upper exhaust fans.
October 22, 2006 4:29:31 PM

can you use the little wire clips on the removable hdd cage to create a mid 120mm fan mount, this should blow straight onto the cards. Perhaps even having the 120mm mount in front of the cage at the same time would help too.
October 22, 2006 4:43:49 PM

Quote:
That may be why the main card runs hotter, the heat rising from the second card below it is not being carried away fast enough, and its rising directly to the top card. Even though you have a fan blowing directly at them from the front, there has to be a place for the air to exit the area as fast as it's coming in, or not much cool air is going to come in! There is a dead space in between the 2 cards that is not getting good airflow in and out, IMHO.


That is a very good point, actually. I need to figure out a way to put in another fan on the middle cage blowing inwards to the cards. I've always wondered why the top GPU is running at c.15C higher.
October 22, 2006 4:48:54 PM

Quote:
1) I see that your third 5.25" bay is empty, correct? Why don't you add a quality 5.25" inch bay fan that is powerful enough to blow cool air on to the CPU. One that is powerful enough for you to feel the air. That way you have cool air coming in from the front at various levels and going out the back and out the top (since heat rises).


Forgot about bay fans....that's interesting, I'm going to look for one, rather than mount something there with pins.

Quote:
3) Heat may be rising from your power supply so make sure there is a powerful fan in the power supply unit. I would make sure the power supply is vented on all sides. Is there a powerful fan that is in front of the power supply as well bringing cool air from the outside of the case on the front to the rear? This would be important.


That's the problem with the Antec P180. The d*mn PSU cage is made for Antec PSUs and larger ones stick out of the cage, leaving me very cramped space outside. There are slots for fitting another 120mm fan there but there is simply no space with my long PSU. I will try to squeeze in a smaller fan there.

Quote:
5) Open up the rear of the case as much as possible to allow more hot air to escape instead of being forced to circulate.


There are simply no more vents at the back as you can see...
October 22, 2006 4:58:44 PM

Quote:
A). Using a PCI vent fan AND slowing down your upper rear exhaust fans should allow better gpu cooling.


I'm very cautious about using PCI fans as you and burn-e86 suggested - I did buy one to try, but the system would not boot for some strange reason.

Quote:
B). Using/fabricating a side INLET fan over the gpus would force more heated air away from the cards, moving it up and out the back and top exhaust vents.

If the videocards DO vent out the pci slots, then you need more inlet flow (either side vent or front) and less power on the upper exhaust fans.


Looks like air inlet is the problem, as many posters have pointed out. I think installing another fan (bay fans sound like a good option) is the answer. Many people here have suggested it. I will try that, just need to buy one now. In the meantime, maybe I'll point the top fan downwards as omgitslong suggested just to try that out.

Some posters suggested I get another case, but I just don't want to go through the whole thing again of taking everything out and putting everything back together....
October 22, 2006 5:15:25 PM

Would increasing the fan speed on the video cards help? That should at least get some of the heat straight out the back.
October 22, 2006 5:28:46 PM

Quote:
Would increasing the fan speed on the video cards help? That should at least get some of the heat straight out the back.

how do you go around doing that?
the only way i can think of is to use ATI tool, but I dont think that it has an option full power on fans. though i'm not too sure, since i havent had a radian card since my 9800pro
October 22, 2006 5:47:39 PM



spot fan. screw onto mother board mounts. not too loud. get two and point one at the one at the cards and in front.


antec spot cool - uk
a b B Homebuilt system
October 22, 2006 6:38:27 PM

Your air flow is optimal. if you want to get rid of the heat in the dead space between the cards you can either get this
or the antec mentioned above....

But i do think that your temps are safe for the most part...those cards can take allot of heat

I would sugest putting the Antec air duct back in with the cpu part out sucking air in to cool the cards.....but since they blow hot air out....it is no good.....unless you can add some kind of baffle to redirect the hot air away....or suck cool air from the side more....
October 22, 2006 8:00:50 PM

Thanks for taking the time to give me the substantial advice, SupremeLaw, you should write a guide for case cooling! There are lots of great advice here from the many posters, thanks to all of you.

I can't get the new stuff straight away and am trying to avoid the costs of changing PSUs, case etc as this system has already cost me too much (maybe just fans). Took the advice of many posters to address the dead air problem around the GPUs. I did 2 things which were slightly counter-intuitive...

(1) Screwed in an old small fan (found among my old stuff) to the left panel by the side of the lower GPU (think it was the lower GPU with the higher temps since my X-Fi soundcard sits very very close to it and it feels hotter to the touch than the upper GPU). The small fan is sucking some cold air into the case to disrupt a little the dead air area around the GPU cards - I think I'll get that Antec spot fan recommended by another poster.



(need to find a way to get it vertical to the side blowing into the GPU channels)

(2) Changed the top fan to blow downwards to increase air inflow so that the left fan is the only exhaust fan right now

Surprisingly, temps have fallen slightly. I ran 3DMark05 twice to heat up the cards and then let them cool to idle. My GPU temps have fallen to around 66-68C (GPU1) and 56-58C (GPU2). The gap in temp between the two has narrowed from c.15C previously to around 10C now. Not sure if this is due to more cool air coming into the system from the top fan blowing down or the small fan blowing cool air in towards the GPU area (doubt the small fan is working much).

Probably because of the top fan now blowing down, it looks like my CPU temps and the southbridge temp (which on the P5W is known to register high temps) has fallen slightly 2-3C.

I suspect the air flow is still not very efficient with the 2 adjustments. I think I'll have to look for a way to attach a fan to blow air INTO the dead air channel between the GPUs. But surprisingly the top fan blowing down has actually lowered overall temps slightly in the case.
October 22, 2006 10:03:21 PM

Here's my theory, assuming the cards exhaust outside the back of the case:
With minimal intake fans you are building a lower pressure inside your case causing the cards to have to work harder to push air outside the case, which may just be coming right back in the case from the outside as well (near the video card area).

There are a few ways you can solve this as others have already mentioned, adding intake fans to the side of your case would help substantially, goal being to equalize pressure inside your case and outside (one intake fan per exhaust, including PSU and video card fans which I'd say are ~1x120 on medium speed).
October 22, 2006 10:54:46 PM

You could mod the side panel door and install two 120mm fans as an intake. One between the cpu heatsink fan cooler and the rams that way it cools two components at the same time. The other on between the two GPU stock cooler intakes. That way you get more cool air inside your case and that should cool down your temps really well. I've done this mod before where I got a 120mm fan to my side panel blowing more cool air to the cpu cooler. My temps went down 5c on idle and 8c more on full load.
October 22, 2006 11:11:29 PM

Here's my suggestion if you don't mind the mod.

Equipements:

Dremel
2 120mm with self-tapping screws
Philips screw driver

Cut the hole similar to the circumference of the fan blades. The cut the four hole for the mount. That's it. It's fairly easy mod and requires a lot of patience.

Here's mine looked like. 80mm fan blowing air to Themaltake Big Typhoon with FM121 120mm fan. Temps of my Pentium D 840 went down 5c at idle and 8c full load.



Here's yours would look like.

October 22, 2006 11:12:01 PM

Get a full tower case. This will allow more room for the components to breath allowing everything to run much cooler. Also, the new Nvidia cards are 2"-3" longer than a standard motherboard and will not fit in Mid-atx cases, so it's the best thing you case do if you plan on making your system future proof.

I suggest the TT Armor or the TT Kandalf, but thats just me.

Either way, all I have to say is that I highly recommend a full tower chassis.
a b B Homebuilt system
October 22, 2006 11:49:52 PM

Looking at the picture....you are pulling that hot air from the GPU's back in...

You may want to flip the fan...it take it out and cover those holes with clear tape....so the hot air does not come back in....

the 2 120mm fan idea would lower the temps for sure.....
October 23, 2006 1:30:02 AM

grrrr.....

I know that hot air rises. Let say a 1 cubic-ft box, air-tighted, and there are hot airs and cold air (despite how..). There's no airflow, HOT AIR WILL RISES AT A VERY SLOW SPEED, FAR SLOWER THAN WHAT YOUR FAN CAN PUSH IT.

SO, the top fan isn't alway have to pushes air upward
a b B Homebuilt system
October 23, 2006 1:33:09 AM

Also if you think it is just airflow to the cards.....as i said above...i just tossed it in for picture sake....and it cools my NB too :) 
a c 84 B Homebuilt system
October 23, 2006 2:39:00 AM

I think you do not have enough air intake capacity to match the output.
1) Remove the filter from the front if the case, if you haven't yet. It will make a difference.
2) Be certain that the lower area cover is as snug as possible, so the PSU heat does not flow into the upper chamber. Maybe even some putty would help.
3) Remove the middle box to clear up the air path.
4) See if you can fit a 38mm high output fan to the front of the case.
5) Verify that all the fans are operating in the proper direction.
October 23, 2006 3:47:32 AM

man... you know what? let OCtop8 try the methods and combination 1 by one to see which combination works best for his computer 8)


stop trying to make everything all perfect now, smart guy :lol: 
October 23, 2006 8:07:46 AM

Bah mid size cases will never win lol
October 23, 2006 9:11:08 AM

Well here is what i would do :) 

120mm fan front side case panal over video cards 89.9cfm fans i have one on my case on hte panal cuz the front has two 80mm and the back has 4 80mm :-/

Get a full tower i preffer lian li cases pretty damn good quality cases with really nice air flow.

try and clean up wires best as possible Im horrible with this cuz im to lazy but yeah your wires look alot like mine.

Just looks like you have alot of stail air in your case not really doing anything

really really cramped space i would show you a pic of my case but i dont have a data cable for my phone yet.

Aside from getting a new case though i dont think its going to drop those temps in half.
October 23, 2006 12:53:11 PM

Ok, looks like I made some progress today.

(1) Took the advice of SupremeLaw and changed the top fan back to blowing out of the case. Also removed the small fan next to the GPU. (BTW, the rear vent is partially covered because I have the fan-speed adjustor for the CNPS9500 installed there)

(2) Drilled a hole into my side panel and installed an 80mm fan sucking cold air into the case blowing towards the centre of the GPUs where I noticed there are vents sucking cold air into the GPUs and exhausting it out the back - did not go for a 120mm fan as I thought I might get lots of dust going inside and I couldn't find a filter at the store today.



Seem to have lowered the GPU temps by around 5C each. Drilling that opening into the side panel was quite a nightmare, with the aluminium pieces flying everywhere! I might install another 80mm or 120mm fan into the side panel either another 80mm side-by-side with the current 80mm fan or a 120mm around the CPU/RAM area as suggested by another user. I think I also have to re-work the wiring. It's going to be difficult to fit another fan next to the PSU unless I change to a smaller PSU which I am not keen on doing right now. Also not keen on changing the case as it will be a real hassle re-assembling the whole thing - might save that for Christmas.

So this is the current layout. I turned down the speed of the top fan to medium setting (1800rpm). The back exhaust fan is running at 2400rpm as is the front (right) panel intake fan. The new 80mm intake fan is running also at 1800rpm. So I'm guessing my intake/exhaust volume should be around the same right now. Will work more on it tomorrow.

October 23, 2006 1:17:09 PM

Good work. Now you get another for fan for the cpu cooler and rams.
October 23, 2006 2:22:15 PM

rpm isnt a good way to determin how much air is moving. Use the cfm rating on the fan its alot more accurate. The 80mm will pobly let in just as much dust as the 120mm. the fan in the back of the GPU is where its sucking in the air to cool the GPU heat sink. the heatsink in hte middle and heatpipes go into that funnle.
October 23, 2006 4:45:46 PM

Quote:
rpm isnt a good way to determin how much air is moving. Use the cfm rating on the fan its alot more accurate. The 80mm will pobly let in just as much dust as the 120mm. the fan in the back of the GPU is where its sucking in the air to cool the GPU heat sink. the heatsink in hte middle and heatpipes go into that funnle.


I'll need to check the cfm ratings then. On the GPU fan, I do still have the 120mm intake fan on the front (right side) of the case blowing cold air into the GPUs from the right. I've removed the HDD cage so it's more "roomy" there now. But the vents in the middle of the GPU where I've installed the new fan appear to be sucking in air as well. I tested it by holding a very thin tissue paper close to it and it was being "pulled" into the vents. I believe the X1950XTX has a newer cooling solution from the other ATI cards.
October 23, 2006 4:52:14 PM

Quote:
So, pick a center point that is directly
between the RAM and the HSF intake fan,
and that should be the axis of rotation
of that second fan.


Those side panels are thicker than I had expected with a rubber layer in between the aluminium exterior and the aluminium/rubber ash flies everywhere! Big cleaning job after. Thankfully I had an old electric drill lying around I just had to buy an 80mm circular blade today. Not too much cash outlay.
a b B Homebuilt system
October 23, 2006 6:45:54 PM

thats nice and clean....
October 23, 2006 7:25:11 PM

Here are some tips that don't involve using power tools or buying hardware. (90% of you probably just stopped reading).

From the pictures it looks like you still have cables in front of (or near) the video card intakes. Move them, the air intake hole for the GPU is small and that big power cable is about 20% of the width.

Add a little judiciously placed cardboard. A vertical piece from the edge of the top exhaust fan (nearest the front of your case) to the top of the CPU heatsink will decrease the amount of air pressure your exhaust fan steals from the CPU fan (thus causing the air to take a shortcut around your heatsink). Make some channels from your air inlet ports to the GPUs. That bottom PCI card will probably be fine without any fan air and you can block it off (although not completely).

Try just opening one of those empty 5 1/4" bays. Add a little cardboard to take heat straight from that bay to the RAM or the CPU.

Add a duct to take air from that 38mm fan somewhere useful. It's blowing on the middle of the GPUs which is not very efficient.

Hold a piece of tissue paper over the grill over the PCI slots. Is it blowing out? If yes, then your next step is to figure out how to get more air out of the case. If it is being sucked in then your need to get more are into the case, and prevent the case from sucking in the warm air through that grill (try masking tape).

These might be small improvements, but they are all free.
October 23, 2006 7:30:15 PM

screw that more power tools! XD
October 24, 2006 2:51:11 AM

Remove all the fanslengthen the cables on all your drives and rest the remaining portion of the PC in Large sealed enclosure filled with vegetable oil.........problem solved, lol
October 24, 2006 4:05:53 AM

Quote:
1) Remove the filter from the front if the case, if you haven't yet. It will make a difference.


Don't do that. Clean the filter if it's plugged but don't pull the filter.

Quote:
4) See if you can fit a 38mm high output fan to the front of the case.


Don't do that either. 38mm high output fans whine like a cat in heat. Instead, do as Chuckhissle recommended - two 12cm fans - or get one of the 25cm fans like those ThermalTake uses in the door of the SE Armor. Larger fans typically give better cfm per dB of fan noise. You can find fan filters if you go with 12cm fans. I can't remember if I've seen them on FrozenCPU or Sidewinder or 3DCool but just search around. Vantec's "where to buy" page links you to a ton of good sellers of cooling parts too.
October 24, 2006 9:31:35 PM

wow, nice machine.
-cm
October 25, 2006 1:30:00 PM

OK, thanks to all the advice of posters on this thread, I think I have done enough for now. Made another hole in the side panel today. Placing of the holes may not be completely optimal as I had to work around the hooves and ridges on the inside of the side panel, but that will have to do for now. Temps in the whole system have come down. GPU1/GPU2 now hovers around 62C/52C. My CPU and mobo temps are also down quite a bit. Short of getting another case, I think I'm going to stop now and wait till next year to change the case. Found some nice air filters today and replaced the steel fan grills. I'm certainly not going to be drilling another hole in a computer case for awhile. When I find some time over the next few days, I will work on the wiring inside the case, but I think I've had enough of "case modding" for now. No more power tools for me!!



Thanks again everyone.
October 25, 2006 1:40:45 PM

Quote:
Temps in the whole system have come down. GPU1/GPU2 now hovers around 62C/52C.


Cool(er)!
October 25, 2006 2:32:43 PM

Low pressure inside the case is exactly what the problem is. Those big 120mm fans blowing air outside the case are creating a low pressure zone inside the case. The ATI graphics card fans have to overcome this low pressure -and- move the desired about of air over the heatsink to effectively remove heat from the board.

Just for grins, cut the speed back (or unplug temporarily) the 120mm exhaust fan at the back of the case, and keep the top exhaust fan on low. CPU temps look fine as-is, and lowering the graphics card temps seem to be the priority.

Greg
October 25, 2006 3:38:31 PM

Nice job man, looks nice too. :D 
October 27, 2006 4:13:27 PM

Hmm....I've set both the back and top exhaust fans to low settings and seem to have suffered no adverse effects temps-wise. Much better now, as the system is much quieter. Overall, since I put in the 2 side panel fans, GPU temps have fallen significantly. In idle, it stays 53/59C or so, which is a far cry from the days when one of them would be hovering in the low 70s.
October 27, 2006 5:18:19 PM

I would change the top fan back to exhaust. Though it may cool the cpu better as an intake, it forces the hot air down further, to where the graphics cards are.

On the slots around the graphics cards, I would remove the bracket bars. In combination with the intake fan that you screwed in, or with a spot fan as suggested by someone else (better in my opinion) by getting rid of those bracket bars, there would be a place for the hot air created around the graphics cards to exit.

Just ideas. They might help, might not, but are worth a try.
October 27, 2006 5:44:14 PM

Hmm, I think that your bigest problem was simply that you had 1x120mm exhaust, 2xGFX eshaust and 1xPSU exhaust and only a single 120mm fan bringing air into the case. Even if you hadn't put fans into those two new holes in the side of the case your temps would have likely dropped.

I try to avoid having intake fans at all. They are less effecient then simply putting a hole in the right spot as the fans themselves generate heat and a lot more turbulance then a passive intake. However, if you point them directly at something that needs some spot-cooling that spot certainly becomes cooler (as you experienced) and cutting a simple hole and sticking a fan in it is a lot easier to add then custom ducting.

I once had a case with 6 80mm case fans (not including any GPU or PSU exhaust fans, and it still had slots for 2 more). It made a lot of noise and ran hotter then all of my later cases (including the one with the same CPU running 10% faster with only 1 120mm case fan). They most effecient way to cool a system is to lower the overall case tempurature, and the best way to do that is to duct the major heat generators (GPU, CPU, PSU) out of the case and let cool air come in passively in a path that cools all of the components.

Otherwise the best way to cool your system is to not put it in a case at all and just have a dedicated fan for every heat-producing component xD Then heat build-up, turbulance, and exhaust problems are all non-existant!

With the first fan you added you actually decreased the cooling power of your case as the GPU exhaust fans were simply taking the cool air and shooting right back out the case before it could absorbe heat from any other components. However, there may have been a suffocation problem where they weren't doing this anyway as they couldn't draw fresh air into the case. With the second case fan I believe you corrected the problem adding some airflow over more of the motherboard and now have a good configuration. Personally I would have tried taking out the intake fan, and opening up some of the 5.25" bays for extra air intake first. Then you would have had more cooling with less fans.

Also, heat rising does matter a lot. That's part of the reason for the BTX redesign. To be able to put more cooling at the top of the case and remove the dead air up there. On a standard ATX tower the top of the case will be significantly warmer then the bottom because a bunch of hot air buids up in the dead air zone created by the PSU and the Optical drives.
October 27, 2006 7:22:36 PM

Glad to see you reach lower temps
dont mind the mess!




I also have the p180, but my 1900XT runs @ 36c IDLE, I left the middle drive cage inplace with the original fan on the right, and added an extra one to cool the gpu... major temp difference, I know your PSU is huge, so you are limited in your drive cooling.

and this little mod sucking hot air out from my 2 wd 74 raptors

October 27, 2006 10:32:59 PM

Maybe this article can give you some ideas

P180 chambered from SPCR

I like how he 'chambered' the CPU and graphics separately.
!