Limited or No wireless connection

Archived from groups: (More info?)

I have a network set up in my house. Three computers connect via wireless.
All three have Very good to excellent signal strength, all three can connect
using current setup.

Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the network with the
limited or no connection error. From time to time they will just as suddenly
re-connect, and work fine.
I know it has to do with the router assigning a DHCP address, but what is
causing it NOT to assign said address?
The router is a brand new Linksys WRT54G, two of the three computers have
Linksys cards, one has a D-link card.
All computers running XP-SP2 using Windows networking software.


--
Les R
All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
13 answers Last reply
More about limited wireless connection
  1. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 08:43:57 -0700, "Feverish"
    <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote:

    >I have a network set up in my house. Three computers connect via wireless.
    >All three have Very good to excellent signal strength, all three can connect
    >using current setup.
    >
    >Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the network with the
    >limited or no connection error. From time to time they will just as suddenly
    >re-connect, and work fine.

    Periodically? Is it at regular intervals, which is the definition of
    periodic? Or is it at random intervals for random lengths of time?
    It sounds to me like an RF interference problem. Possibly another
    wireless system, microwave oven, or other source of 2.4GHz trash. If
    you could provide a better description of the timing, I can try to
    guess the source by the pattern.

    >I know it has to do with the router assigning a DHCP address, but what is
    >causing it NOT to assign said address?

    Nope. That's not the problem. If you don't have connectivity, DHCP
    renewal will fail. Unless you turn on all three computers at the same
    time, there's no way that all three leases will require renewal at the
    same time. Also, the default lease time is one day so you should not
    be experiencing problems "periodically" if caused by DHCP issues.
    Methinks not.

    >The router is a brand new Linksys WRT54G, two of the three computers have
    >Linksys cards, one has a D-link card.

    Models of Linksys cards and D-Link card?

    >All computers running XP-SP2 using Windows networking software.

    Try changing the RF channel in the WRT54G in case it's interference.
    You're choices are 1, 6, and 11.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  2. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    > I know it has to do with the router assigning a DHCP address, but what is
    > causing it NOT to assign said address?

    How do you know that? That sounds quite unlikely because the router
    will only offer an address in response to a client requesting it and
    it's unlikely that they all do so at the same time. If you want to kill
    your theory, then assign a longer lease and I suspect you will still
    suffer the same problem.

    What is more likely happening is some interference that is causing all
    clients to lose their RF connection, then what happens is that they re-
    associate and then you see a request for an IP address which is normal.

    David.
  3. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Because a little box pops up and says I am unable to acquire a DHCP
    address??

    --
    Les R
    All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    "David Taylor" <djtaylor@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1d8529d0e04a1429989dfe@news.cable.ntlworld.com...
    >> I know it has to do with the router assigning a DHCP address, but what is
    >> causing it NOT to assign said address?
    >
    > How do you know that? That sounds quite unlikely because the router
    > will only offer an address in response to a client requesting it and
    > it's unlikely that they all do so at the same time. If you want to kill
    > your theory, then assign a longer lease and I suspect you will still
    > suffer the same problem.
    >
    > What is more likely happening is some interference that is causing all
    > clients to lose their RF connection, then what happens is that they re-
    > associate and then you see a request for an IP address which is normal.
    >
    > David.
  4. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Irregular intervals.
    No 2.4 phones.
    There are other networks that occasionally show up, all weak signals.
    Channel is NOT set to default, I believe I have it set at 6.
    Linksys cards are WMP54G, I don't remember the D-link card, (and at the
    moment don't want to open the case.) I don't think it is the cards since it
    affects both brands the same way. I don't even think it is the router per
    se, since this happened with my old router as well. (Fried a circuit on the
    old one somehow, one day it just didn't light up) Router plugged into Surge
    protector, as is other items, only router went bad.

    --
    Les R
    All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:haamh11u2r5minqbl5b5b82hv7ndchblhf@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 08:43:57 -0700, "Feverish"
    > <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote:
    >
    >>I have a network set up in my house. Three computers connect via wireless.
    >>All three have Very good to excellent signal strength, all three can
    >>connect
    >>using current setup.
    >>
    >>Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the network with the
    >>limited or no connection error. From time to time they will just as
    >>suddenly
    >>re-connect, and work fine.
    >
    > Periodically? Is it at regular intervals, which is the definition of
    > periodic? Or is it at random intervals for random lengths of time?
    > It sounds to me like an RF interference problem. Possibly another
    > wireless system, microwave oven, or other source of 2.4GHz trash. If
    > you could provide a better description of the timing, I can try to
    > guess the source by the pattern.
    >
    >>I know it has to do with the router assigning a DHCP address, but what is
    >>causing it NOT to assign said address?
    >
    > Nope. That's not the problem. If you don't have connectivity, DHCP
    > renewal will fail. Unless you turn on all three computers at the same
    > time, there's no way that all three leases will require renewal at the
    > same time. Also, the default lease time is one day so you should not
    > be experiencing problems "periodically" if caused by DHCP issues.
    > Methinks not.
    >
    >>The router is a brand new Linksys WRT54G, two of the three computers have
    >>Linksys cards, one has a D-link card.
    >
    > Models of Linksys cards and D-Link card?
    >
    >>All computers running XP-SP2 using Windows networking software.
    >
    > Try changing the RF channel in the WRT54G in case it's interference.
    > You're choices are 1, 6, and 11.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    > Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  5. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 17:40:13 -0700, "Feverish"
    <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote:

    >Irregular intervals.

    I asked for more descriptive, not less. Approximate interval and
    duration in minutes. Does it coincide with meal times? Coincide
    with 15 minute commercial breaks? Are you near a cafeteria full of
    microwave ovens? Any TIVO boxes with wireless? Any 2.4GHz security
    cameras? Any 2.4Ghz cordless mice?

    >No 2.4 phones.

    It doesn't have to be yours. I could be your neighbors. Is your
    wireless router perhaps sitting in a window with a good view of the
    neighborhood?

    >There are other networks that occasionally show up, all weak signals.
    >Channel is NOT set to default, I believe I have it set at 6.

    90% of the wireless access points are delivered configured for channel
    6. Please try channel 1 or 11. If in UK, try 14.

    >Linksys cards are WMP54G, I don't remember the D-link card, (and at the
    >moment don't want to open the case.)

    OK. Good card. Comes in 4 different models. Check the power save
    settings on both cards. Some cards don't recover very gracefully when
    the computah goes into hibrination, sleep mode, power save, or
    wireless card power save (all these are different).

    >I don't think it is the cards since it
    >affects both brands the same way.

    Assumption, the mother of all screwups.

    >I don't even think it is the router per
    >se, since this happened with my old router as well.

    Good clue. That's another reason why I suspect RF interference. If
    both the old and new routers were mostly working, then interference
    will affect them both equally.

    >(Fried a circuit on the
    >old one somehow, one day it just didn't light up) Router plugged into Surge
    >protector, as is other items, only router went bad.

    I spend the better part of a day troubleshooting an erratic disconnect
    problem. Eventually, I discovered that the wireless router was
    rebooting. A little investigation uncovered a defective power strip
    that was very intermittant. Check your power please.

    >Because a little box pops up and says I am unable to acquire a DHCP
    >address??

    Which program is generating that error message? That's not the common
    error message delivered by Windoze XP SP2 Wireless Zero Config.
    However, that's just a curiousity item. There are only 2 things I
    know that can prematurely require a premature DHCP renewal without
    rebooting the computer. Interference won't do it.
    1. The router reboots.
    2. The wireless client radio or computah goes to sleep.

    The WRT54G has the uptime on the status page. You can see if there
    have been any uncheduled reboots by monitoring the uptime.

    Temporarily disable *ALL* the power save features in the wireless
    client computah and see if that magically fixes the problem.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  6. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    "Feverish" <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote in message
    news:uCESe.7831$ct5.7306@fed1read04...
    >I have a network set up in my house. Three computers connect via wireless.
    >All three have Very good to excellent signal strength, all three can
    >connect using current setup.
    >
    > Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the network with the
    > limited or no connection error. From time to time they will just as
    > suddenly re-connect, and work fine.
    > I know it has to do with the router assigning a DHCP address, but what is
    > causing it NOT to assign said address?
    > The router is a brand new Linksys WRT54G, two of the three computers have
    > Linksys cards, one has a D-link card.
    > All computers running XP-SP2 using Windows networking software.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Les R
    > All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    > Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    >
    I had a wrt54g (new) dropping wireless clients frequently and irregularily.
    I reinstalled the firmware and did a hard reset of the router. After that
    all was well.

    Ian
  7. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Off line about 36 hours now, straight. Doesn't coincide with mealtimes,
    nearest microwave is downstairs in Kitchen, but doesn't seem to be related
    to MW usage. Commercials are boring, but not part of the problem. No
    cafeteria, no TIVO, no cameras, all phones are 5.4 Ghz. I do have a wireless
    mouse: Logitech MX700 now replaced with MX1000.

    Can't answer re:Neighbors, only that we've never been able to eavesdrop on
    their conversations, one wireless network, occasionally picked up could be
    neighbor. Signal weak, and encrypted (not that means much in this setting
    that I know of.)
    Router is on streetside, but I've no choice in this matter.
    Channel is set to 9
    Power save on all cards turned off
    How do I determine the "uptime" I can't find a setting/log for this?
    As far as I can tell neither router nor modem are spontaneously rebooting.
    Error message reads (paraphrasing) Windows could not repair your internet
    connection because it could not complete the following action. Windows could
    not renew the IP address. Please contact your system administrator(that me,
    and I haven't kept anyone off as far as I can tell.)

    --
    Les R
    All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:717nh1l4696r0nc1cklv9o3f7u177g178m@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 17:40:13 -0700, "Feverish"
    > <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Irregular intervals.
    >
    > I asked for more descriptive, not less. Approximate interval and
    > duration in minutes. Does it coincide with meal times? Coincide
    > with 15 minute commercial breaks? Are you near a cafeteria full of
    > microwave ovens? Any TIVO boxes with wireless? Any 2.4GHz security
    > cameras? Any 2.4Ghz cordless mice?
    >
    >>No 2.4 phones.
    >
    > It doesn't have to be yours. I could be your neighbors. Is your
    > wireless router perhaps sitting in a window with a good view of the
    > neighborhood?
    >
    >>There are other networks that occasionally show up, all weak signals.
    >>Channel is NOT set to default, I believe I have it set at 6.
    >
    > 90% of the wireless access points are delivered configured for channel
    > 6. Please try channel 1 or 11. If in UK, try 14.
    >0
    >>Linksys cards are WMP54G, I don't remember the D-link card, (and at the
    >>moment don't want to open the case.)
    >
    > OK. Good card. Comes in 4 different models. Check the power save
    > settings on both cards. Some cards don't recover very gracefully when
    > the computah goes into hibrination, sleep mode, power save, or
    > wireless card power save (all these are different).
    >
    >>I don't think it is the cards since it
    >>affects both brands the same way.
    >
    > Assumption, the mother of all screwups.
    >
    >>I don't even think it is the router per
    >>se, since this happened with my old router as well.
    >
    > Good clue. That's another reason why I suspect RF interference. If
    > both the old and new routers were mostly working, then interference
    > will affect them both equally.
    >
    >>(Fried a circuit on the
    >>old one somehow, one day it just didn't light up) Router plugged into
    >>Surge
    >>protector, as is other items, only router went bad.
    >
    > I spend the better part of a day troubleshooting an erratic disconnect
    > problem. Eventually, I discovered that the wireless router was
    > rebooting. A little investigation uncovered a defective power strip
    > that was very intermittant. Check your power please.
    >
    >>Because a little box pops up and says I am unable to acquire a DHCP
    >>address??
    >
    > Which program is generating that error message? That's not the common
    > error message delivered by Windoze XP SP2 Wireless Zero Config.
    > However, that's just a curiousity item. There are only 2 things I
    > know that can prematurely require a premature DHCP renewal without
    > rebooting the computer. Interference won't do it.
    > 1. The router reboots.
    > 2. The wireless client radio or computah goes to sleep.
    >
    > The WRT54G has the uptime on the status page. You can see if there
    > have been any uncheduled reboots by monitoring the uptime.
    >
    > Temporarily disable *ALL* the power save features in the wireless
    > client computah and see if that magically fixes the problem.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    > Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  8. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    had a similar problem, was due to other wireless access points nearby
    sharing same channel, fixed by changing the channel via the admin setup
    page, e.g. at 192.168.1.1 or 2.1 etc

    apparently there is some kind of bug related to the protocol grabbing
    one of the undesired access points instead of your preferred access
    point

    there seem to be numerous network bugs in XP connectivity software in
    general as well
  9. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 22:01:34 -0700, "Feverish"
    <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote:

    >Off line about 36 hours now, straight.

    I have a feeling I'm reading this wrong. Does this mean that it fails
    to connect every time you've tried it over the last 36 hours? Or does
    it mean that you've been experiencing random connection failures over
    the last 36 hours with occasionally successful connections?

    >Doesn't coincide with mealtimes,
    >nearest microwave is downstairs in Kitchen, but doesn't seem to be related
    >to MW usage. Commercials are boring, but not part of the problem. No
    >cafeteria, no TIVO, no cameras, all phones are 5.4 Ghz.

    Ok, that eliminates most local sources of interference. Please note
    that some models of 5.2GHz cordless phones use 2.4GHz on one
    direction. I vaguely recall that it's the handsets that transmit
    2.4Ghz and receive on 5.2GHz but may have it backwards. Also, some
    cordless phone bases transmit continuously, even when the handset is
    in the on hook position. Pull the plug on the base and see if that's
    the problem.

    >I do have a wireless
    >mouse: Logitech MX700 now replaced with MX1000.

    I couldn't determine what frequency it's running on, but it probably
    is not 2.4Ghz.

    >Can't answer re:Neighbors, only that we've never been able to eavesdrop on
    >their conversations, one wireless network, occasionally picked up could be
    >neighbor. Signal weak, and encrypted (not that means much in this setting
    >that I know of.)

    If they're not broadcasting their SSID, you won't see any nearby wi-fi
    access points.

    >Router is on streetside, but I've no choice in this matter.
    >Channel is set to 9

    Channel 9 is roughly half way between channel 6 and 11. The wi-fi
    signal is approximately 5 channels (25MHz) wide. If there are nearby
    access points running on channels 6 or 11, you will get interference
    from both. I suggest you stay with the recommended 1, 6, and 11 or 14
    in the UK.

    >Power save on all cards turned off

    What about power save, hibernate, and standby on the computer?

    >How do I determine the "uptime" I can't find a setting/log for this?

    I'm using a WRT54G but with Sveasoft Alchemy firmware. My "status"
    page shows the uptime. However, I guess you're using the official
    Linksys firmware, which might not have this feature.

    >As far as I can tell neither router nor modem are spontaneously rebooting.

    Rebooting the modem would not cause a premature DHCP renewal. Only
    the router can sometimes (not always) do that. Usually, it's the
    client that asks for a new DHCP address. The reason I'm emphasizing
    the possibility is that your symptoms of not getting a new DHCP
    address after a connection drop do not make sense unless either the
    client initiates the DHCP request, or the server (router) reboots.

    >Error message reads (paraphrasing) Windows could not repair your internet
    >connection because it could not complete the following action. Windows could
    >not renew the IP address. Please contact your system administrator

    That's the message you get when you select "Repair" from the right
    click menu on the Windoze XP SP2 Wireless Zero Config icon. Is that
    what you're doing? Repair does *NOT* mean re-connect. The correct
    procedure is to "Show Available Networks", select your wireless SSID,
    and hit "connect". Both Connect and Repair will attempt to renew the
    DHCP address which apparently is failing for some reason.

    What else are you doing that you're not disclosing? From your
    descriptions, I'm having difficulties guessing what you're doing, and
    what's happening.

    >(that me,
    >and I haven't kept anyone off as far as I can tell.)

    Could you explain what you mean by "drop off the network" as in your
    original question? If it means loss of internet connectivity, are you
    *SURE* that it's not a problem at the ISP, and that you're trying to
    fix it with the WZX Repair feature? More specifically, does the
    "limited or no connection error" happen *AFTER* you do something with
    Windoze?

    "Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the
    network with the limited or no connection error. From time
    to time they will just as suddenly re-connect, and work fine."

    Let's pretend that there's nothing wrong with the wireless and that my
    guess as to decoding the symptoms and actions are correct. Next time
    you have a good connection followed by all computers "dropping off the
    network", try this experiment. Do NOT do the Repair thing:
    Start -> Run -> cmd <enter>
    ipconfig
    Does it show a proper IP address? If yes, you don't need a new one.
    If 169.254.xxx.xxx, then something caused the clients to demand a new
    IP address. This would be rather weird and uncommon. My guess is
    still a power save timeout at the client.

    Next, see if you can talk to the router with:
    ping 192.168.1.1
    If you get proper responses, your wireless connection is intact and
    functional.

    Next try to ping the other computers on your LAN. They should be
    192.168.1.100 and up. Get the IP addresses with ipconfig in advance
    so you're ready to try this. If you have a firewall in place, it may
    prevent ping from working.

    Next, try to ping something on the internet. The obvious starting
    place would be the gateway IP at your ISP to see if the cable modem or
    Cox is down. However, that might change periodically. Grab the IP
    address of the gateway from the WRT54G status page. Also ping some
    common web sites such as www.yahoo.com. If that doesn't work, try
    pinging them by IP address (you'll have to get the IP address when
    it's working and write it down in advance). If that fails, go yell at
    Cox support.

    The idea is to isolate what part of your connection puzzle is failing.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  10. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    I just had that same exact error message, using free WiFi while staying at
    the LaQuinta in Sacramento. It was a router issue. Access was spotty, come
    and go, then nothing. Disconnecting and trying to "repair" wouldnt fix it.
    When it was connected, it had good signal strength.

    I was wondering if there was a set number of conection limit hit, and it
    would drop.


    "Feverish" <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote in message
    news:uCESe.7831$ct5.7306@fed1read04...
    >I have a network set up in my house. Three computers connect via wireless.
    >All three have Very good to excellent signal strength, all three can
    >connect using current setup.
    >
    > Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the network with the
    > limited or no connection error. From time to time they will just as
    > suddenly re-connect, and work fine.
    > I know it has to do with the router assigning a DHCP address, but what is
    > causing it NOT to assign said address?
    > The router is a brand new Linksys WRT54G, two of the three computers have
    > Linksys cards, one has a D-link card.
    > All computers running XP-SP2 using Windows networking software.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Les R
    > All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    > Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    >
  11. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Off line means No connection via wireless only. I cant hit the Connect
    button ( unless I disconnect first) since I'm connected but don't have a
    DHCP address. I have to repair or disconnect/ reconnect (which is what
    repair seems to do anyway,) One computer was online for about 15 minutes
    after a "repair" but then dropped off. Another computer was offline then
    suddenly was online for a while before dropping off. No problem with ISP
    since wired computers online 24/7.
    I do see neighbors wireless connections("Phoenix-house", "Dorsey" but no
    bars and we can't connect via their routers.)
    Pinged two of the wireless computers, one timed out and no data received,
    one sent back data packet, but is still "offline."

    Will change to Channel 14 (but I'm US)

    --
    Les R
    All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    news:b9ooh1hjqkfq2lbsg8vvqt3e5bljj1bkq2@4ax.com...
    > On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 22:01:34 -0700, "Feverish"
    > <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote:
    >
    >>Off line about 36 hours now, straight.
    >
    > I have a feeling I'm reading this wrong. Does this mean that it fails
    > to connect every time you've tried it over the last 36 hours? Or does
    > it mean that you've been experiencing random connection failures over
    > the last 36 hours with occasionally successful connections?
    >
    >>Doesn't coincide with mealtimes,
    >>nearest microwave is downstairs in Kitchen, but doesn't seem to be related
    >>to MW usage. Commercials are boring, but not part of the problem. No
    >>cafeteria, no TIVO, no cameras, all phones are 5.4 Ghz.
    >
    > Ok, that eliminates most local sources of interference. Please note
    > that some models of 5.2GHz cordless phones use 2.4GHz on one
    > direction. I vaguely recall that it's the handsets that transmit
    > 2.4Ghz and receive on 5.2GHz but may have it backwards. Also, some
    > cordless phone bases transmit continuously, even when the handset is
    > in the on hook position. Pull the plug on the base and see if that's
    > the problem.
    >
    >>I do have a wireless
    >>mouse: Logitech MX700 now replaced with MX1000.
    >
    > I couldn't determine what frequency it's running on, but it probably
    > is not 2.4Ghz.
    >
    >>Can't answer re:Neighbors, only that we've never been able to eavesdrop on
    >>their conversations, one wireless network, occasionally picked up could be
    >>neighbor. Signal weak, and encrypted (not that means much in this setting
    >>that I know of.)
    >
    > If they're not broadcasting their SSID, you won't see any nearby wi-fi
    > access points.
    >
    >>Router is on streetside, but I've no choice in this matter.
    >>Channel is set to 9
    >
    > Channel 9 is roughly half way between channel 6 and 11. The wi-fi
    > signal is approximately 5 channels (25MHz) wide. If there are nearby
    > access points running on channels 6 or 11, you will get interference
    > from both. I suggest you stay with the recommended 1, 6, and 11 or 14
    > in the UK.
    >
    >>Power save on all cards turned off
    >
    > What about power save, hibernate, and standby on the computer?
    >
    >>How do I determine the "uptime" I can't find a setting/log for this?
    >
    > I'm using a WRT54G but with Sveasoft Alchemy firmware. My "status"
    > page shows the uptime. However, I guess you're using the official
    > Linksys firmware, which might not have this feature.
    >
    >>As far as I can tell neither router nor modem are spontaneously rebooting.
    >
    > Rebooting the modem would not cause a premature DHCP renewal. Only
    > the router can sometimes (not always) do that. Usually, it's the
    > client that asks for a new DHCP address. The reason I'm emphasizing
    > the possibility is that your symptoms of not getting a new DHCP
    > address after a connection drop do not make sense unless either the
    > client initiates the DHCP request, or the server (router) reboots.
    >
    >>Error message reads (paraphrasing) Windows could not repair your internet
    >>connection because it could not complete the following action. Windows
    >>could
    >>not renew the IP address. Please contact your system administrator
    >
    > That's the message you get when you select "Repair" from the right
    > click menu on the Windoze XP SP2 Wireless Zero Config icon. Is that
    > what you're doing? Repair does *NOT* mean re-connect. The correct
    > procedure is to "Show Available Networks", select your wireless SSID,
    > and hit "connect". Both Connect and Repair will attempt to renew the
    > DHCP address which apparently is failing for some reason.
    >
    > What else are you doing that you're not disclosing? From your
    > descriptions, I'm having difficulties guessing what you're doing, and
    > what's happening.
    >
    >>(that me,
    >>and I haven't kept anyone off as far as I can tell.)
    >
    > Could you explain what you mean by "drop off the network" as in your
    > original question? If it means loss of internet connectivity, are you
    > *SURE* that it's not a problem at the ISP, and that you're trying to
    > fix it with the WZX Repair feature? More specifically, does the
    > "limited or no connection error" happen *AFTER* you do something with
    > Windoze?
    >
    > "Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the
    > network with the limited or no connection error. From time
    > to time they will just as suddenly re-connect, and work fine."
    >
    > Let's pretend that there's nothing wrong with the wireless and that my
    > guess as to decoding the symptoms and actions are correct. Next time
    > you have a good connection followed by all computers "dropping off the
    > network", try this experiment. Do NOT do the Repair thing:
    > Start -> Run -> cmd <enter>
    > ipconfig
    > Does it show a proper IP address? If yes, you don't need a new one.
    > If 169.254.xxx.xxx, then something caused the clients to demand a new
    > IP address. This would be rather weird and uncommon. My guess is
    > still a power save timeout at the client.
    >
    > Next, see if you can talk to the router with:
    > ping 192.168.1.1
    > If you get proper responses, your wireless connection is intact and
    > functional.
    >
    > Next try to ping the other computers on your LAN. They should be
    > 192.168.1.100 and up. Get the IP addresses with ipconfig in advance
    > so you're ready to try this. If you have a firewall in place, it may
    > prevent ping from working.
    >
    > Next, try to ping something on the internet. The obvious starting
    > place would be the gateway IP at your ISP to see if the cable modem or
    > Cox is down. However, that might change periodically. Grab the IP
    > address of the gateway from the WRT54G status page. Also ping some
    > common web sites such as www.yahoo.com. If that doesn't work, try
    > pinging them by IP address (you'll have to get the IP address when
    > it's working and write it down in advance). If that fails, go yell at
    > Cox support.
    >
    > The idea is to isolate what part of your connection puzzle is failing.
    >
    > --
    > Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    > 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    > Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    > Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
  12. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Oops no Channel 14, trying channel 11

    --
    Les R
    All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    "Feverish" <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote in message
    news:d08Te.11541$ct5.6373@fed1read04...
    > Off line means No connection via wireless only. I cant hit the Connect
    > button ( unless I disconnect first) since I'm connected but don't have a
    > DHCP address. I have to repair or disconnect/ reconnect (which is what
    > repair seems to do anyway,) One computer was online for about 15 minutes
    > after a "repair" but then dropped off. Another computer was offline then
    > suddenly was online for a while before dropping off. No problem with ISP
    > since wired computers online 24/7.
    > I do see neighbors wireless connections("Phoenix-house", "Dorsey" but no
    > bars and we can't connect via their routers.)
    > Pinged two of the wireless computers, one timed out and no data received,
    > one sent back data packet, but is still "offline."
    >
    > Will change to Channel 14 (but I'm US)
    >
    > --
    > Les R
    > All Outgoing Mail screened with NAV
    > Age is a high price to pay for maturity.
    > "Jeff Liebermann" <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote in message
    > news:b9ooh1hjqkfq2lbsg8vvqt3e5bljj1bkq2@4ax.com...
    >> On Sun, 4 Sep 2005 22:01:34 -0700, "Feverish"
    >> <feverish@NOcox.SPAM.net> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Off line about 36 hours now, straight.
    >>
    >> I have a feeling I'm reading this wrong. Does this mean that it fails
    >> to connect every time you've tried it over the last 36 hours? Or does
    >> it mean that you've been experiencing random connection failures over
    >> the last 36 hours with occasionally successful connections?
    >>
    >>>Doesn't coincide with mealtimes,
    >>>nearest microwave is downstairs in Kitchen, but doesn't seem to be
    >>>related
    >>>to MW usage. Commercials are boring, but not part of the problem. No
    >>>cafeteria, no TIVO, no cameras, all phones are 5.4 Ghz.
    >>
    >> Ok, that eliminates most local sources of interference. Please note
    >> that some models of 5.2GHz cordless phones use 2.4GHz on one
    >> direction. I vaguely recall that it's the handsets that transmit
    >> 2.4Ghz and receive on 5.2GHz but may have it backwards. Also, some
    >> cordless phone bases transmit continuously, even when the handset is
    >> in the on hook position. Pull the plug on the base and see if that's
    >> the problem.
    >>
    >>>I do have a wireless
    >>>mouse: Logitech MX700 now replaced with MX1000.
    >>
    >> I couldn't determine what frequency it's running on, but it probably
    >> is not 2.4Ghz.
    >>
    >>>Can't answer re:Neighbors, only that we've never been able to eavesdrop
    >>>on
    >>>their conversations, one wireless network, occasionally picked up could
    >>>be
    >>>neighbor. Signal weak, and encrypted (not that means much in this setting
    >>>that I know of.)
    >>
    >> If they're not broadcasting their SSID, you won't see any nearby wi-fi
    >> access points.
    >>
    >>>Router is on streetside, but I've no choice in this matter.
    >>>Channel is set to 9
    >>
    >> Channel 9 is roughly half way between channel 6 and 11. The wi-fi
    >> signal is approximately 5 channels (25MHz) wide. If there are nearby
    >> access points running on channels 6 or 11, you will get interference
    >> from both. I suggest you stay with the recommended 1, 6, and 11 or 14
    >> in the UK.
    >>
    >>>Power save on all cards turned off
    >>
    >> What about power save, hibernate, and standby on the computer?
    >>
    >>>How do I determine the "uptime" I can't find a setting/log for this?
    >>
    >> I'm using a WRT54G but with Sveasoft Alchemy firmware. My "status"
    >> page shows the uptime. However, I guess you're using the official
    >> Linksys firmware, which might not have this feature.
    >>
    >>>As far as I can tell neither router nor modem are spontaneously
    >>>rebooting.
    >>
    >> Rebooting the modem would not cause a premature DHCP renewal. Only
    >> the router can sometimes (not always) do that. Usually, it's the
    >> client that asks for a new DHCP address. The reason I'm emphasizing
    >> the possibility is that your symptoms of not getting a new DHCP
    >> address after a connection drop do not make sense unless either the
    >> client initiates the DHCP request, or the server (router) reboots.
    >>
    >>>Error message reads (paraphrasing) Windows could not repair your internet
    >>>connection because it could not complete the following action. Windows
    >>>could
    >>>not renew the IP address. Please contact your system administrator
    >>
    >> That's the message you get when you select "Repair" from the right
    >> click menu on the Windoze XP SP2 Wireless Zero Config icon. Is that
    >> what you're doing? Repair does *NOT* mean re-connect. The correct
    >> procedure is to "Show Available Networks", select your wireless SSID,
    >> and hit "connect". Both Connect and Repair will attempt to renew the
    >> DHCP address which apparently is failing for some reason.
    >>
    >> What else are you doing that you're not disclosing? From your
    >> descriptions, I'm having difficulties guessing what you're doing, and
    >> what's happening.
    >>
    >>>(that me,
    >>>and I haven't kept anyone off as far as I can tell.)
    >>
    >> Could you explain what you mean by "drop off the network" as in your
    >> original question? If it means loss of internet connectivity, are you
    >> *SURE* that it's not a problem at the ISP, and that you're trying to
    >> fix it with the WZX Repair feature? More specifically, does the
    >> "limited or no connection error" happen *AFTER* you do something with
    >> Windoze?
    >>
    >> "Here's the problem: all three periodically drop off the
    >> network with the limited or no connection error. From time
    >> to time they will just as suddenly re-connect, and work fine."
    >>
    >> Let's pretend that there's nothing wrong with the wireless and that my
    >> guess as to decoding the symptoms and actions are correct. Next time
    >> you have a good connection followed by all computers "dropping off the
    >> network", try this experiment. Do NOT do the Repair thing:
    >> Start -> Run -> cmd <enter>
    >> ipconfig
    >> Does it show a proper IP address? If yes, you don't need a new one.
    >> If 169.254.xxx.xxx, then something caused the clients to demand a new
    >> IP address. This would be rather weird and uncommon. My guess is
    >> still a power save timeout at the client.
    >>
    >> Next, see if you can talk to the router with:
    >> ping 192.168.1.1
    >> If you get proper responses, your wireless connection is intact and
    >> functional.
    >>
    >> Next try to ping the other computers on your LAN. They should be
    >> 192.168.1.100 and up. Get the IP addresses with ipconfig in advance
    >> so you're ready to try this. If you have a firewall in place, it may
    >> prevent ping from working.
    >>
    >> Next, try to ping something on the internet. The obvious starting
    >> place would be the gateway IP at your ISP to see if the cable modem or
    >> Cox is down. However, that might change periodically. Grab the IP
    >> address of the gateway from the WRT54G status page. Also ping some
    >> common web sites such as www.yahoo.com. If that doesn't work, try
    >> pinging them by IP address (you'll have to get the IP address when
    >> it's working and write it down in advance). If that fails, go yell at
    >> Cox support.
    >>
    >> The idea is to isolate what part of your connection puzzle is failing.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    >> 150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    >> Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    >> Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    > Because a little box pops up and says I am unable to acquire a DHCP
    > address??

    Red herring.
Ask a new question

Read More

Connectivity Connection Computers Wireless Connections Wireless Networking Product