Setting Up Wireless Network At Home With T-1 Connection --..

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Hello,

I'm moving into a new townhouse community that is already equipped
with a T-1 connection. In my old home, I had a cable Internet
connection, which I ran into a D-Link router to create my wireless
network. Can anyone tell me if I need something different to create a
wireless network in the new place with the T-1 line? Or, should I be
able to plug it into LAN jack on the D-Link router and be set? The
reason I'm wondering is that, with the old setup, I ran the line first
into the cable modem, then to the router. From there, I had a cable
connecting the router to my desktop PC and two laptops that worked
across the wireless network. Having no cable modem in the middle
makes me wonder how I'm supposed to set this all up.

Thanks.

Shawn
9 answers Last reply
More about setting wireless network home connection
  1. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Shawn <shawn@asprocomm.com> wrote:
    > I'm moving into a new townhouse community that is already equipped
    > with a T-1 connection. In my old home, I had a cable Internet
    > connection, which I ran into a D-Link router to create my wireless

    There needs to be a bridge somewhere on the T-1 line.
    Is the townhouse all connected to the T1? If that's the case, then what
    comes out of the wall might be coming from a router, and you would just
    connect that to the WAN port on your router. How many outlets do you have?
    Just one that you are then going to cable/wirless around in your building,
    or are there already jacks in different rooms? I would prefer to have my
    own firewall/router ahead of a public network.

    Maybe there's wireless in place as well, so you can surf by the pool. ;-)

    I would also expect rather poor performance. A T-1 is already slower than
    you cable modem for downloads, and if it is being shared with some other
    useres, the performance will vary drastically while someone else is
    uploading or downloading something.

    On the other hand, many businesses have lots of users on a single T-1.
    They just aren't all streaming video downloads at the same time.

    --
    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  2. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    shawn@asprocomm.com (Shawn) wrote in
    news:a49340dd.0403301143.378badba@posting.google.com:

    > Can anyone tell me if I need something different to create a
    > wireless network in the new place with the T-1 line?

    I doubt every unit in your new townhouse has a dedicated T-1 line - that's
    pretty expensive.

    Rather, your complex probably has T1 access and it's shared across the
    units. In this case, it'll be a RJ-45 jack somewhere in your house.

    However, if it does turn out each unit has T1 access, you'll need a T1
    CSU/DSU... it's basically like a cable modem. In turn, you can hook up the
    CSU/DSU to a router to provide access for your LAN.

    --
    Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
  3. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    I agree that it's extremely unlikely that each unit has a full four-wire T1
    to a central office, which might run anywhere from $600 - $1200 a month in
    most places. I've seen fractional T1 for less, and symmetrical "T1 speeds"
    at much less - but I'm not sure what this is physically. It's possible (but
    unlikely) that the complex has a PBX or a router multiplexing T1s onto
    something bigger, like a DS3 carrier. That would still be very expensive
    compared to cable or DSL direct to each unit.

    In the unlikely scenario that everybody has T1 in their townhhouse, you
    wouldn't be able to tell by looking at the connector - they both use an
    RJ45. If it is a T1, it almost certainly runs to a local router or PBX in
    the complex, and a CSU is not required. The function of a CSU in North
    America is to provide line continuity across a local device outage
    (auto-loopback) and to provide remote diagnostic functions to the telco so
    they can test the local loop and premises demarc for problems. PBX or router
    ports are typically not configured to require this from a downstream device.

    Some bridging device - which could be built in to a CSU - is required to
    connnect T1 to Ethernet on a wifi router. There are probably wifi routers
    that terminate T1 directly.

    I'm betting you have Ethernet in your townhouse, and a share of the
    community T1.

    "Lucas Tam" <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns94BCDB1706885nntprogerscom@140.99.99.130...
    > shawn@asprocomm.com (Shawn) wrote in
    > news:a49340dd.0403301143.378badba@posting.google.com:
    >
    > > Can anyone tell me if I need something different to create a
    > > wireless network in the new place with the T-1 line?
    >
    > I doubt every unit in your new townhouse has a dedicated T-1 line - that's
    > pretty expensive.
    >
    > Rather, your complex probably has T1 access and it's shared across the
    > units. In this case, it'll be a RJ-45 jack somewhere in your house.
    >
    > However, if it does turn out each unit has T1 access, you'll need a T1
    > CSU/DSU... it's basically like a cable modem. In turn, you can hook up the
    > CSU/DSU to a router to provide access for your LAN.
    >
    > --
    > Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    > Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    > http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
  4. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    "gary" <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote in news:8Vqac.3597$891.1358
    @newssvr24.news.prodigy.com:

    > It's possible (but
    > unlikely) that the complex has a PBX or a router multiplexing T1s onto
    > something bigger, like a DS3 carrier. That would still be very expensive
    > compared to cable or DSL direct to each unit.

    Now that you mention DSL... maybe T1 = 1.5mbps DSL service?

    --
    Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
  5. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Certainly possible. I think you would ordinarily use HDSL for T1 speeds.
    That would probably be cheaper than "real" T1, but it still uses 4 wires.
    The wires don't have to be conditioned, like T1 lines, and you can go about
    twice the distance without repeater, so that makes the lines cheaper. But
    many telcos are slow on the uptake when it comes to undercutting their
    cash-cow T1 offerings. I don't think prices for this are competitive with
    1.5 Mbps ADSL. HDSL is mainly used by businesses that really require
    symmetic bandwidth and better QOS (but still no guarantees, even with T1,
    unless you pay extra for an ironclad promise).

    "Lucas Tam" <REMOVEnntp@rogers.com> wrote in message
    news:Xns94BCEF2D67019nntprogerscom@140.99.99.130...
    > "gary" <pleasenospam@sbcglobal.net> wrote in news:8Vqac.3597$891.1358
    > @newssvr24.news.prodigy.com:
    >
    > > It's possible (but
    > > unlikely) that the complex has a PBX or a router multiplexing T1s onto
    > > something bigger, like a DS3 carrier. That would still be very expensive
    > > compared to cable or DSL direct to each unit.
    >
    > Now that you mention DSL... maybe T1 = 1.5mbps DSL service?
    >
    > --
    > Lucas Tam (REMOVEnntp@rogers.com)
    > Please delete "REMOVE" from the e-mail address when replying.
    > http://members.ebay.com/aboutme/coolspot18/
  6. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    I don't think it's a dedicated T1; I think it's just access to a T1
    line that is shared by others in the townhouse community. So, if I
    have to buy a CSU/DSU, where do I get it, and how much should I look
    to pay?
  7. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    You would only need a CSU/DSU if you had a dedicated T1 delivered
    to your townhouse, so I wouldn't worry about it. If you really
    HAD a dedicated T1, then you'd need a router with a T1 CSU/DSU on
    one side and an Ethernet on the other. There aren't any consumer
    grade gizmos like this, so the hardware would cost you $1000 or so.

    You should probably not worry about the "T1" and see if you can
    find how you're supposed to access the network. Typically this
    might be via some kind of DSL.

    Aaron

    ---

    ~ I don't think it's a dedicated T1; I think it's just access to a T1
    ~ line that is shared by others in the townhouse community. So, if I
    ~ have to buy a CSU/DSU, where do I get it, and how much should I look
    ~ to pay?
  8. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    As it stands right now, I just plug a patch cable into the wall jack
    and run that to the ethernet port on the back of my desktop PC. That
    works fine. But to set up my wireless network, I want to know if I
    can just run the patch cable to the WAN port on the D-Link router I've
    already got (which I used with my cable Internet connection at my old
    home) and then to the desktop machine from there. Or, do I need to do
    something else to establish the wireless network in my home with this
    T1 access?

    Aaron Leonard <Aaron@Cisco.COM> wrote in message news:<h83m60p89aitm0hpllh071kr43cihvhiue@4ax.com>...
    > You would only need a CSU/DSU if you had a dedicated T1 delivered
    > to your townhouse, so I wouldn't worry about it. If you really
    > HAD a dedicated T1, then you'd need a router with a T1 CSU/DSU on
    > one side and an Ethernet on the other. There aren't any consumer
    > grade gizmos like this, so the hardware would cost you $1000 or so.
    >
    > You should probably not worry about the "T1" and see if you can
    > find how you're supposed to access the network. Typically this
    > might be via some kind of DSL.
    >
    > Aaron
    >
    > ---
    >
    > ~ I don't think it's a dedicated T1; I think it's just access to a T1
    > ~ line that is shared by others in the townhouse community. So, if I
    > ~ have to buy a CSU/DSU, where do I get it, and how much should I look
    > ~ to pay?
  9. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Okay, so it sounds like you know that your wall jack is Ethernet. That's
    what I thought. It connects upstream to a router or bridge of some kind. If
    a straight-through patch cable works to connect your PC directly, you may
    need a crossover connecter (or a crossover cable) to connect the WAN port on
    the wifi router. These are cheap. Try it one way, and if the link light
    doesn't come on, try it the other way.

    Wifi routers usually implement the client side of connection management. So,
    you need to know what the ISP requires. - PPOE, for example? You need to get
    this information either from neighbors who are successfully using the
    service, or the complex manager, or the ISP. There may be a userid/password
    you need to know. Surely you were provided with some information about these
    things?

    "Shawn" <shawn@asprocomm.com> wrote in message
    news:a49340dd.0404010425.7092a72f@posting.google.com...
    > As it stands right now, I just plug a patch cable into the wall jack
    > and run that to the ethernet port on the back of my desktop PC. That
    > works fine. But to set up my wireless network, I want to know if I
    > can just run the patch cable to the WAN port on the D-Link router I've
    > already got (which I used with my cable Internet connection at my old
    > home) and then to the desktop machine from there. Or, do I need to do
    > something else to establish the wireless network in my home with this
    > T1 access?
    >
    > Aaron Leonard <Aaron@Cisco.COM> wrote in message
    news:<h83m60p89aitm0hpllh071kr43cihvhiue@4ax.com>...
    > > You would only need a CSU/DSU if you had a dedicated T1 delivered
    > > to your townhouse, so I wouldn't worry about it. If you really
    > > HAD a dedicated T1, then you'd need a router with a T1 CSU/DSU on
    > > one side and an Ethernet on the other. There aren't any consumer
    > > grade gizmos like this, so the hardware would cost you $1000 or so.
    > >
    > > You should probably not worry about the "T1" and see if you can
    > > find how you're supposed to access the network. Typically this
    > > might be via some kind of DSL.
    > >
    > > Aaron
    > >
    > > ---
    > >
    > > ~ I don't think it's a dedicated T1; I think it's just access to a T1
    > > ~ line that is shared by others in the townhouse community. So, if I
    > > ~ have to buy a CSU/DSU, where do I get it, and how much should I look
    > > ~ to pay?
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