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Best photo scanner

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December 15, 2004 5:28:34 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work best
for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?

- JB

More about : photo scanner

December 15, 2004 8:45:53 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Of course, it all depends on what you want to do with your prints. I am
having fabulous luck with the new Epson 2580 (US model, about $150
street, probably less). It offers print, slide and negative scanning, a
nice set of software tools, and very clean results that I am able to use
for semi-pro purposes. As for scanning tips, go to Google and type in
'scanning tips' and you'll hit a goldmine. I happen to like Wayne
Fulton's extremely helpful ideas -- concise and easy to read.

Oh, if you should buy the Epson be sure to read the setup manual very
carefully. Setup is a breeze but there are some rules.....

JB wrote:
> I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work best
> for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
>
> - JB
>
>
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 1:47:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:kb1wd.940$hb7.118@fe03.lga...
> I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work
best
> for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
>
> - JB
>
>

For Paper photos and other flat stuff, the Maximum resolution you will ever
need is 300-600 Dpi.

Any flatbed scanner you buy today will easily have that resolution.

For tips:
http://www.scantips.com

--
CSM1
http://www.carlmcmillan.com
--
Related resources
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 1:47:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

CSM1 wrote:
> "JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:kb1wd.940$hb7.118@fe03.lga...
>
>>I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work
>
> best
>
>>for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
>>
>>- JB
>>
> For Paper photos and other flat stuff, the Maximum resolution you will ever
> need is 300-600 Dpi.
>
> Any flatbed scanner you buy today will easily have that resolution.
>
> For tips:
> http://www.scantips.com
>

Good Advice!
For scanning Photos, almost any flatbed scanner will give excellent
results. Also don't get carried away trying to scan at the highest
resolution the scanner offers. As CSM1 suggested, 300 dpi is about all
you need because a print rarely has more information than that. If you
want a warm fuzzy feeling you can try 600 ppi, but I doubt VERY
seriously that you will notice ANY difference in image quality between
the two, but the 600 dpi scan will contain 4X as many MB to store and
manipulate in a photo editor.
Bob Williams
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 1:47:04 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

CSM1 wrote:
> "JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:kb1wd.940$hb7.118@fe03.lga...
> > I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work best
> > for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
>
> For Paper photos and other flat stuff, the Maximum resolution you will ever
> need is 300-600 Dpi.
>
> Any flatbed scanner you buy today will easily have that resolution.

Another consideration, though, is color fidelity. My trusty pair of E3s
(for which I paid $5 total) produce sufficiently muddied colors and
insufficiently resolved shadows that they're virtually useless for
scanning photos to any sort of archival quality, though they're fine for
the black/white stuff I normally use them for (and for an occasional
photo-to-webpage use).

Are current scanners pretty much equally good as far as color fidelity
goes?

- Brooks


--
The "bmoses-nospam" address is valid; no unmunging needed.
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 4:15:26 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Bob Williams wrote:
>
>
> CSM1 wrote:
>
>> "JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:kb1wd.940$hb7.118@fe03.lga...
>>
>>> I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work
>>
>>
>> best
>>
>>> for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
>>>
>>> - JB
>>>
>> For Paper photos and other flat stuff, the Maximum resolution you will
>> ever
>> need is 300-600 Dpi.
>>
>> Any flatbed scanner you buy today will easily have that resolution.
>>
>> For tips:
>> http://www.scantips.com
>>
>
> Good Advice!
> For scanning Photos, almost any flatbed scanner will give excellent
> results. Also don't get carried away trying to scan at the highest
> resolution the scanner offers. As CSM1 suggested, 300 dpi is about all
> you need because a print rarely has more information than that. If you
> want a warm fuzzy feeling you can try 600 ppi, but I doubt VERY
> seriously that you will notice ANY difference in image quality between
> the two, but the 600 dpi scan will contain 4X as many MB to store and
> manipulate in a photo editor.
> Bob Williams


Hi Bob...

I reply to you; but in reality to all of my peers and betters.

I'd like to suggest a re-think of this, and invite any/all
interested to experiment a bit. I've done it repeatedly, and
am certain it's worth it.

If - and that's a big if - you're certain that for now and
for ever you only want to look at the pics on a monitor, or
print them at the original size, then I'll (almost) agree
with you. 300 dpi is going to get almost, if not all, of
the info available.

But - suppose you're scanning something now for posterity.
Something like those school photos that we all carried in
our wallets while the kids were growing. We don't know
how future generations will feel about them - one day they
may trigger memories or feelings that may want an 8 x 10
or better. Right?

Well, I've proven over and over that scanning it at 2400,
then de-noising/cleaning/etc (be prepared to spend lots of
time) and saving that means 8 x 10's or larger will be
availabe if ever they're wanted. Without ANY of the
pixelation of upsampling!! Try it; it's true.

Next, if you wish, you can downsample that image to
say 800 600 for viewing, and after a bit of unsharp it
will be much much sharper than scanning at 300 in the
first place. Much!

Save both - pass on both for future generations to do with
as they will. I save mine on cd/dvd's as two subs under
a descriptive name - ie:

c:\wallet (.txt describing what the pics are)
c:\wallet\view (800 * 600 fine quality jpeg's )
c:\wallet\print (huge ones's - tiff)
c:\wallet\text (800 *600 fine quality scans of backs, if not

blank)


Just one old guy's opinion. I invite others.

Ken
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 4:15:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Ken Weitzel" <kweitzel@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:o k5wd.503596$Pl.340620@pd7tw1no...
>
>
> Bob Williams wrote:
> >
> >
> > CSM1 wrote:
> >
> >> "JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> news:kb1wd.940$hb7.118@fe03.lga...
> >>
> >>> I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would
work
> >>
> >>
> >> best
> >>
> >>> for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
> >>>
> >>> - JB
> >>>
> >> For Paper photos and other flat stuff, the Maximum resolution you will
> >> ever
> >> need is 300-600 Dpi.
> >>
> >> Any flatbed scanner you buy today will easily have that resolution.
> >>
> >> For tips:
> >> http://www.scantips.com
> >>
> >
> > Good Advice!
> > For scanning Photos, almost any flatbed scanner will give excellent
> > results. Also don't get carried away trying to scan at the highest
> > resolution the scanner offers. As CSM1 suggested, 300 dpi is about all
> > you need because a print rarely has more information than that. If you
> > want a warm fuzzy feeling you can try 600 ppi, but I doubt VERY
> > seriously that you will notice ANY difference in image quality between
> > the two, but the 600 dpi scan will contain 4X as many MB to store and
> > manipulate in a photo editor.
> > Bob Williams
>
>
> Hi Bob...
>
> I reply to you; but in reality to all of my peers and betters.
>
> I'd like to suggest a re-think of this, and invite any/all
> interested to experiment a bit. I've done it repeatedly, and
> am certain it's worth it.
>
> If - and that's a big if - you're certain that for now and
> for ever you only want to look at the pics on a monitor, or
> print them at the original size, then I'll (almost) agree
> with you. 300 dpi is going to get almost, if not all, of
> the info available.
>
> But - suppose you're scanning something now for posterity.
> Something like those school photos that we all carried in
> our wallets while the kids were growing. We don't know
> how future generations will feel about them - one day they
> may trigger memories or feelings that may want an 8 x 10
> or better. Right?
>
> Well, I've proven over and over that scanning it at 2400,
> then de-noising/cleaning/etc (be prepared to spend lots of
> time) and saving that means 8 x 10's or larger will be
> availabe if ever they're wanted. Without ANY of the
> pixelation of upsampling!! Try it; it's true.

I agree with you completely, Ken, and you saved me a lot of typing.
The assumption with only scanning at 300 dpi is that all you want to do is
duplicate the same size print, or view on-screen. I've made tons of
enlargements from old black & white photos, and can say without hesitation
that higher resolution images allow for FAR better enlargements. You just
can't stretch 300DPI to a 4x enlargement, etc. without producing seriously
bad effects.

I agree that you should try and predict the intended use of the
image...which is to say that you CAN'T really predict this! For that
reason, I tend to scan larger than I currently want, just so that there is
easy wiggle room. Starting with a big scan is far better than up-sampling a
crummy 300dpi original.
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 11:25:18 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner, comp.periphs.scanners, rec.photo.digital (More info?)

I'm not an expert at this, but about 6 or 8 years ago I compared a
number of scans made on my cheap Memorex (really Visioneer) 6136
scanner to the same photos scanned on a more expensive HP scanner.

What I found was that, although the HP did a better job overall, each
scanner had different strengths and weaknesses in color reproduction.
Each had some group of photos that it reproduced well and others not so
well - though they were different groups. The HP was more or less
acceptable on everything I scanned, and good on some things. The
Memorex was good on some things and poor at others - requiring
considerable after the fact color correction.

In the best of all worlds, we'd want to see 10 different photos of all
types scanned on all the different scanners and posted to the web where
we could compare them (is there such a site?) But even then, it's
possible that an uncalibrated monitor would give misleading views of
the strengths and weaknesses of each scanner.

I'm hoping that the modern scanners are more consistently good.
Alan
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 5:15:58 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Ken Weitzel" <kweitzel@shaw.ca> wrote in message
news:o k5wd.503596$Pl.340620@pd7tw1no...
>
>
> Bob Williams wrote:
> >
> >
> > CSM1 wrote:
> >
> >> "JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >> news:kb1wd.940$hb7.118@fe03.lga...
> >>
> >>> I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would
work
> >>
> >>
> >> best
> >>
> >>> for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
> >>>
> >>> - JB
> >>>
> >> For Paper photos and other flat stuff, the Maximum resolution you will
> >> ever
> >> need is 300-600 Dpi.
> >>
> >> Any flatbed scanner you buy today will easily have that resolution.
> >>
> >> For tips:
> >> http://www.scantips.com
> >>
> >
> > Good Advice!
> > For scanning Photos, almost any flatbed scanner will give excellent
> > results. Also don't get carried away trying to scan at the highest
> > resolution the scanner offers. As CSM1 suggested, 300 dpi is about all
> > you need because a print rarely has more information than that. If you
> > want a warm fuzzy feeling you can try 600 ppi, but I doubt VERY
> > seriously that you will notice ANY difference in image quality between
> > the two, but the 600 dpi scan will contain 4X as many MB to store and
> > manipulate in a photo editor.
> > Bob Williams
>
>
> Hi Bob...
>
> I reply to you; but in reality to all of my peers and betters.
>
> I'd like to suggest a re-think of this, and invite any/all
> interested to experiment a bit. I've done it repeatedly, and
> am certain it's worth it.
>
> If - and that's a big if - you're certain that for now and
> for ever you only want to look at the pics on a monitor, or
> print them at the original size, then I'll (almost) agree
> with you. 300 dpi is going to get almost, if not all, of
> the info available.
>
> But - suppose you're scanning something now for posterity.
> Something like those school photos that we all carried in
> our wallets while the kids were growing. We don't know
> how future generations will feel about them - one day they
> may trigger memories or feelings that may want an 8 x 10
> or better. Right?
>
> Well, I've proven over and over that scanning it at 2400,
> then de-noising/cleaning/etc (be prepared to spend lots of
> time) and saving that means 8 x 10's or larger will be
> availabe if ever they're wanted. Without ANY of the
> pixelation of upsampling!! Try it; it's true.
>
> Next, if you wish, you can downsample that image to
> say 800 600 for viewing, and after a bit of unsharp it
> will be much much sharper than scanning at 300 in the
> first place. Much!
>
> Save both - pass on both for future generations to do with
> as they will. I save mine on cd/dvd's as two subs under
> a descriptive name - ie:
>
> c:\wallet (.txt describing what the pics are)
> c:\wallet\view (800 * 600 fine quality jpeg's )
> c:\wallet\print (huge ones's - tiff)
> c:\wallet\text (800 *600 fine quality scans of backs, if not
>
> blank)
>
>
> Just one old guy's opinion. I invite others.
>
> Ken
>
I agree with Ken in the case of wallet size photos, you could scan at a
higher resolution in order to get a larger image from the small image of a
wallet.

A wallet size is 2 x 3 inches, so if you want to blow up the image to an 8
x10, you would have to increase the size of the image by 4 times.

Assume, 300 dpi for the most information the wallet photo contains, then to
get a 4X enlargement, you scan at 1200 dpi.
The cost of scanning at 1200 dpi is a large file size, the image will not
contain any more information, it will just be bigger.

Since, an 2 x 3 inch is not the same ratio as 8 x 10, you will crop some to
the image to fit 8 x 10. A 2 x 3 is a 1:1.5 ratio, 8 x 10 is 1:1.25 ratio.

The only time you need more than 300-600 dpi is when you want to enlarge a
small photo. The photo still only contains about 300 dpi of information.

There are exceptions to the rule.
I have scanned documents at 600 dpi because the document contained fine
lines that were missed at 300 dpi. Electronic schematics have fine lines
running vertically and horizontally which are missed at 300 dpi.

Wayne Fulton covers that on his Scantips.com.
http://www.scantips.com/basics02.html page 1
http://www.scantips.com/basics2c.html page 2

Again, just about any scanner you buy today will have that much resolution.

--
CSM1
http://www.carlmcmillan.com
--
December 16, 2004 6:05:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Ron" <rgood@netzero.com> wrote in message
news:Xf3wd.9838$EL2.8029@fe05.lga...
> Of course, it all depends on what you want to do with your prints. I am
> having fabulous luck with the new Epson 2580 (US model, about $150
I should have said, I care much more about speed (and preservation) than
quality. I'm envisioning a scanner with a tray where I could insert say 100
4 x 6 photos and scan them all one after the other. Is there anything like
this?
Anonymous
December 16, 2004 8:20:30 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"Alan Meyer" <ameyer2@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:1103214318.249275.314310@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> I'm not an expert at this, but about 6 or 8 years ago I compared a
> number of scans made on my cheap Memorex (really Visioneer) 6136
> scanner to the same photos scanned on a more expensive HP scanner.
>
> What I found was that, although the HP did a better job overall, each
> scanner had different strengths and weaknesses in color reproduction.
> Each had some group of photos that it reproduced well and others not so
> well - though they were different groups. The HP was more or less
> acceptable on everything I scanned, and good on some things. The
> Memorex was good on some things and poor at others - requiring
> considerable after the fact color correction.
>
> In the best of all worlds, we'd want to see 10 different photos of all
> types scanned on all the different scanners and posted to the web where
> we could compare them (is there such a site?) But even then, it's
> possible that an uncalibrated monitor would give misleading views of
> the strengths and weaknesses of each scanner.
>
> I'm hoping that the modern scanners are more consistently good.
> Alan
>

Here you can find photos by many cameras and most scanners that you can
think of.
http://www.photosig.com/go/photos

--
CSM1
http://www.carlmcmillan.com
--
Anonymous
December 17, 2004 3:39:44 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:rQmwd.1113$lM4.512@fe03.lga...
>
> "Ron" <rgood@netzero.com> wrote in message
> news:Xf3wd.9838$EL2.8029@fe05.lga...
> > Of course, it all depends on what you want to do with your prints. I am
> > having fabulous luck with the new Epson 2580 (US model, about $150
> I should have said, I care much more about speed (and preservation) than
> quality. I'm envisioning a scanner with a tray where I could insert say
100
> 4 x 6 photos and scan them all one after the other. Is there anything like
> this?
>
>
Yes, there is.
It is called Automatic Document Feeder.

Some Hp, Epson and Microtek scanners have them.

HP:
http://www.hp.com/united-states/consumer/gateway/fax_co...
Click Scanners for Home and Office, then Midrange Scanners. Two scanners,
the 5550 and 5590.

Epson ADF for 2480 and 2580:
http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/ProductQuickSpec.jsp...

Epson ADF for 3170 and 4180:
http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/ProductQuickSpec.jsp...

Microtek, the 5950 is about $150.
http://www.microtekusa.com/di.html

--
CSM1
http://www.carlmcmillan.com
--
December 17, 2004 3:39:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:ksAwd.148$F67.42@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>
> Epson ADF for 2480 and 2580:
> http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/ProductQuickSpec.jsp...

This looks like the best one. That HP is pretty old I think.

Okay, so what are some other tips for scanning photos really quick? Is there
a program that works better with this scanner than others?

The basic question is; I have four or five photo albums of 4 x 6 photos, how
do I get them into the computer as fast as possible?

Oh, and are there any photo service companies that can do this for me?

Thanks for your help,

- JB
December 17, 2004 3:39:45 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
news:ksAwd.148$F67.42@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>
> Epson ADF for 2480 and 2580:
> http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/ProductQuickSpec.jsp...
>

Looks like the 2480 scans 4 x 6 in 35 seconds, but they don't say at whiat
DPI at:
http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/consumer/consDetail....

Also, scan speed is only one factor, the scanner can take 24 print photos at
a time. The Microtek doesn't say how many photos you can stack into the tray
at a time.

> Microtek, the 5950 is about $150.
> http://www.microtekusa.com/di.html
>
It looks like the scan time for this one is 18 second on 300 DPI, and 30
seconds for 600.
December 17, 2004 3:39:46 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:yeDwd.1523$bz.987@fe03.lga...
>
> "CSM1" <nomoremail@nomail.com> wrote in message
> news:ksAwd.148$F67.42@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>>
I should say, the HP 4060 looks like it might work since it has some sort of
tray for loading photos, and the scan speed is 10 seconds. Does anyone know
how this well this scanner works?

http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06b/15179-641...
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 8:47:21 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"David Chien" <chiendh@uci.edu> wrote in message news:cpveji$bnb$2@news.service.uci.edu...
>> Here you can find photos by many cameras and most scanners that you can think of.
>> http://www.photosig.com/go/photos
> same at www.imaging-resource.com - > scanners

Cool. Very useful sites.

Alan
Anonymous
December 18, 2004 8:55:50 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

"JB" <jbrandonbbremove@hotmail.com> wrote in message news:r7Dwd.1522$rC.975@fe03.lga...
>
> Okay, so what are some other tips for scanning photos really quick? Is there a program
> that works better with this scanner than others?
>
> The basic question is; I have four or five photo albums of 4 x 6 photos, how do I get
> them into the computer as fast as possible?
>
> Oh, and are there any photo service companies that can do this for me?

Yes there are service companies. Search Google or Froogle for
photo scanning and you'll find some. Prices are probably going to
be upward of 50 cents each photo, maybe quite a bit higher.

Here are two more ideas:

1. With a scanner that doesn't have a feeder, put two, three, or
four prints on the plate at a time - whatever fits. Some scanners
come with software that recognizes the edges automatically (don't
know how well the work), or you can just leave them that way and
only cut out individual images some time in the future when you
find you need one.

2. Get a child to do your scanning. If a 12 year old takes one
minute for each scan (could be 3 or 4 images per scan), and
you pay her 10 to 15 cents a scan, she's making $6-9 an hour.
You may have a a responsible child of your own, or a neighbor
may have one who would love the opportunity to do this. It will
cost a lot less than going to a service bureau, will allow you to
supervise the technique used, and you won't have commit
your family photos to the mail.

I wouldn't think this violates any labor laws, but I'm no expert
on that.

Alan
December 19, 2004 10:36:39 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

JB wrote:
> I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work best
> for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?

Whatever you buy, don't buy one with a florescent bulb. Get one with a
RGB LED, which has far better color fidelity and lasts longer.

Uni


>
> - JB
>
>
Anonymous
December 20, 2004 9:32:03 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner, comp.periphs.scanners, rec.photo.digital (More info?)

Hi

The HP Scanjet 3970 scanner is a wonderful scanner. Goes for about $100
I think.

Regards,
Gary Hendricks
www.basic-digital-photography.com
December 20, 2004 11:22:27 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner,comp.periphs.scanners,rec.photo.digital (More info?)

What's an example of a current scanner with one kidn and a scanner witht he
other?

- JB
"Uni" <no.email@no.email.invalid> wrote in message
news:41C5DBE7.8070202@no.email.invalid...
> JB wrote:
>> I want to scan a large number of print photos, which scanner would work
>> best for this? What tips do you have for scanning these?
>
> Whatever you buy, don't buy one with a florescent bulb. Get one with a RGB
> LED, which has far better color fidelity and lasts longer.
>
> Uni
>
>
>>
>> - JB
>
!