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Electrical convertor for my wireles router is extremely ho..

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  • Routers
  • Power Supplies
  • Wireless Networking
Last response: in Wireless Networking
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September 18, 2005 4:29:59 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply adapter
of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power supply is
plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is one that is
really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the convertor for more than a
few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its what converts the
voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it should be this hot right?
Although it only is hot on the back strip of the actual adapter and not all
of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is covered in some kind of
coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm still worried that it way
too hot as the black part cant be touched for more than a few seconds. The
travel adapter convertor is plugged into a socket convertor because UK uses
three inputs for the electrical socket rather than two like everywhere else.
The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its working
fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since getting the
router. But is it dangerous?

More about : electrical convertor wireles router extremely

Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 18, 2005 4:30:00 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

"Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
>The first is the actual power supply adapter
>of the router which is fine in terms of temperature.

That's fine, but what are the input ratings for this wall wart? It
might be universal (90-270V or some such) in which case you don't need
the 'converter', but it's probably just a wall wart with 110V input
and "12V" output...

>plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is one that is
>really hot.

It depends on what kind of "converter block" you have, there are two
types, and they are _not_ interchangable:

1) A diode that only gives you one half-cycle of 220V power, which is
roughly equivalent to 110V power for resistive loads. This is only
suitable for hair dryers, lights, and resistance heaters.

2) A small transformer that converts from 220VAC to 110VAC, but is
usually only good for a very low-power device. Of course, if you have
a 12V, 1A power supply, that's only about a 25 watt load, which should
be fine.

What do the labels on your "converter block" say? I'd say if anything
runs at "too hot to touch" it's potentially dangerous and should be
fixed (probably replacing it with the appropriate device).

You could also ask D-Link for a country-appropriate converter, or stop
by your local electronics supply store (take your existing converter
and AP) and see if they can find a substitute.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 18, 2005 4:30:00 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 12:29:59 GMT, "Mohammed"
<fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

>Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
>electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply adapter
>of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power supply is
>plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is one that is
>really hot...
(...)
>The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its working
>fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since getting the
>router. But is it dangerous?

Yes, it's going to start a fire. The "converter" is a diode or
dropping resistor. It's not designed to run transformers or switching
power supplies.

The product data sheet does not disclose if the DLink 108ag DI-624S
http://www.dlink.com/products/?sec=0&pid=390
will run directly on 220VAC without a "converter". Most of the
switching power supplies will do this. Look on the label on the DLink
power supply and see if it will run on 220VAC. It will say something
like:
100-240VAC - 50-60Hz
If so, it should work directly on UK power. Otherwise, I suggest you
either:
1. Find a 5VDC 2.5A power adapter that will run on UK power and will
fit the router.
2. Purchase a transformer voltage converter for the purpose. They're
big, heavy, ugly, overpriced, but safe. Something like this:
http://www.lashen.com/vendors/TRV/Default.asp





--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 18, 2005 7:02:47 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

> travel adapter convertor is plugged into a socket convertor because UK uses
> three inputs for the electrical socket rather than two like everywhere else.

Loads of places have provision for 3 connectors, it's for the earth
which is essential with devices which can be made live. Pretty much
anything metal. It also provides a safety feature since until the earth
gate is opened, the live and neutral outlets are protected by a shutter.

I wouldn't worry about it getting hot, just check that everything is
suited to the right voltage.

David.
September 19, 2005 3:03:57 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing convertor im
currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router though.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...

Will that one be ok with the router?

On the power supply of the router it says:
INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A

Its not gonna work without the convertor right?

I'm relaly concerned about the temperature the one I ordered doesnt even
have a black strip thing either.


"Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
> electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
> adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power
> supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is
> one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the convertor
> for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its
> what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it should
> be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the actual
> adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is
> covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm
> still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched for
> more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into a
> socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical socket
> rather than two like everywhere else.
> The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
> working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
> getting the router. But is it dangerous?
>
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 19, 2005 3:03:58 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Sun, 18 Sep 2005 23:03:57 GMT, "Mohammed"
<fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

>Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing convertor im
>currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router though.
>http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...
>
>Will that one be ok with the router?

No. That Belkin "converter" is just another diode or resitor.
http://catalog.belkin.com/IWCatProductPage.process?Merc...
It will get just as hot as your existing converter. Get a transformer
or a replacement UK 220V 5V 2.5A power supply.

>On the power supply of the router it says:
>INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
>OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A
>
>Its not gonna work without the convertor right?

Correct. That will NOT work on 220VAC. Sorry.

>I'm relaly concerned about the temperature the one I ordered doesnt even
>have a black strip thing either.

A what?


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
September 19, 2005 3:05:44 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing convertor im
currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router though.
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...

Will that one be ok with the router?

On the power supply of the router it says:
INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A

Its not gonna work without the convertor right?

I'm relaly concerned about the temperature the one I ordered doesnt even
have a black strip thing either.


"Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
> electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
> adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power
> supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is
> one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the convertor
> for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its
> what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it should
> be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the actual
> adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is
> covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm
> still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched for
> more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into a
> socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical socket
> rather than two like everywhere else.
> The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
> working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
> getting the router. But is it dangerous?
>

"Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
> electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
> adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power
> supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is
> one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the convertor
> for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its
> what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it should
> be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the actual
> adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is
> covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm
> still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched for
> more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into a
> socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical socket
> rather than two like everywhere else.
> The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
> working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
> getting the router. But is it dangerous?
>
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 19, 2005 11:50:38 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

> Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing convertor im
> currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router though.
> http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...
>
> Will that one be ok with the router?
>
> On the power supply of the router it says:
> INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
> OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A

You will definitely still need the converter. If you're in the UK, go
to Maplin and buy a switched mode PSU, sorry I didn't pay attention to
what you had originally but here are some choices.

http://www.maplin.co.uk/search.aspx?MenuNo=1275&MenuNam...
20Mode&FromMenu=y&doy=19m9

There are others if you want a transformer based solution, I also like
this type as then you can take it anywhere and it has replaceable plug
bits

http://www.maplin.co.uk/search.aspx?MenuNo=1277
&MenuName=Traveller+Adaptors+Range&worldid=7&FromMenu=y&doy=19m9

Maplin are either mail order or you can go to a shop.

David.
September 20, 2005 2:57:14 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Mohammed,

The short answer is NO. The kind of "converter" that you are using or
intending to use is totally unsuitable for use with the plug pack type of
power supply that you have with your router.

Electrically, the power supply is designed for alternating current as
supplied from the power outlet. The "converter" effectively chops the mains
voltage from the power outlet into 1/2 and by doing so, makes it more direct
current (DC) rather than alternating current (AC) as required by the router
power supply.

Continued use of such converters will damage the existing power supply by
supplying the direct current to its internal transformer causing excessive
overheating and no doubt, ultimately, a fire. The are designed for use with
some electric shavers and small table lamps only. Note that their use in
many countries is prohibited because of the safety risks that you are
encountering.

Jeff and other above have advised correctly that you obtain a new and
correct power supply for the router and do not use the existing power supply
with a "converter". It is a very dangerous practice to continue. You are
very lucky that you have not caused a serious fire by now with its use.

Again, DO NOT USE A "CONVERTER" WITH THE EXISTING POWER SUPPLY.

It is far too dangerous.

Peter

"Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:cpmXe.77441$2n6.2137@fe3.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing convertor
im
> currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router
though.
>
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...
ncoding=UTF8
>
> Will that one be ok with the router?
>
> On the power supply of the router it says:
> INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
> OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A
>
> Its not gonna work without the convertor right?
>
> I'm relaly concerned about the temperature the one I ordered doesnt even
> have a black strip thing either.
>
>
> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power
> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is
> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the convertor
> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its
> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
should
> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
actual
> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is
> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm
> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched for
> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into a
> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical socket
> > rather than two like everywhere else.
> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
> >
>
> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power
> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is
> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the convertor
> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its
> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
should
> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
actual
> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is
> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm
> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched for
> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into a
> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical socket
> > rather than two like everywhere else.
> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
> >
>
>
September 20, 2005 2:57:15 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

I dont understand why D-Link would supply this convertor with the router if
it was not suitable?
You say it will damage it but surely they would have known this? It is
extremely hot on the black area of the convertor though maybe its just
faulty?


"Pierre" <rainsford@ihug.com.au> wrote in message
news:D gm5h4$u4p$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
> Mohammed,
>
> The short answer is NO. The kind of "converter" that you are using or
> intending to use is totally unsuitable for use with the plug pack type of
> power supply that you have with your router.
>
> Electrically, the power supply is designed for alternating current as
> supplied from the power outlet. The "converter" effectively chops the
> mains
> voltage from the power outlet into 1/2 and by doing so, makes it more
> direct
> current (DC) rather than alternating current (AC) as required by the
> router
> power supply.
>
> Continued use of such converters will damage the existing power supply by
> supplying the direct current to its internal transformer causing excessive
> overheating and no doubt, ultimately, a fire. The are designed for use
> with
> some electric shavers and small table lamps only. Note that their use in
> many countries is prohibited because of the safety risks that you are
> encountering.
>
> Jeff and other above have advised correctly that you obtain a new and
> correct power supply for the router and do not use the existing power
> supply
> with a "converter". It is a very dangerous practice to continue. You are
> very lucky that you have not caused a serious fire by now with its use.
>
> Again, DO NOT USE A "CONVERTER" WITH THE EXISTING POWER SUPPLY.
>
> It is far too dangerous.
>
> Peter
>
> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:cpmXe.77441$2n6.2137@fe3.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing convertor
> im
>> currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router
> though.
>>
> http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...
> ncoding=UTF8
>>
>> Will that one be ok with the router?
>>
>> On the power supply of the router it says:
>> INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
>> OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A
>>
>> Its not gonna work without the convertor right?
>>
>> I'm relaly concerned about the temperature the one I ordered doesnt even
>> have a black strip thing either.
>>
>>
>> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
>> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
>> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power
>> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is
>> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the
>> > convertor
>> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its
>> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
> should
>> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
> actual
>> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is
>> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm
>> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched for
>> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into a
>> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical socket
>> > rather than two like everywhere else.
>> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
>> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
>> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
>> >
>>
>> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
>> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
>> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
>> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This power
>> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this is
>> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the
>> > convertor
>> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing Its
>> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
> should
>> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
> actual
>> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it is
>> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But I'm
>> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched for
>> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into a
>> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical socket
>> > rather than two like everywhere else.
>> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
>> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
>> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
September 20, 2005 11:37:22 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Does the "converter" have a D-Link branding label on it? I suspect not. Did
you buy the router and converter together from a recognised D-Link agent in
the U.K.? I suspect not.
Legitimate D-Link suppliers in the UK would not supply such a unit and it is
likely that someone may have brought them in from the USA quite
independently. To the best of my knowledge, D-Link do not make or sell such
a converter anywhere for that use.

Perhaps you should go back to your supplier and confront them with the facts
that they have advised you totally incorrectly and even dangerously.

As before, DO NOT USE SUCH A CONVERTER, but get a correct supply for your
router that is applicable for the mains voltage in the UK, preferably from a
legitimate and knowledgable D-Link supplier.

Peter

"Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
news:aOCXe.430$WV1.165@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> I dont understand why D-Link would supply this convertor with the router
if
> it was not suitable?
> You say it will damage it but surely they would have known this? It is
> extremely hot on the black area of the convertor though maybe its just
> faulty?
>
>
> "Pierre" <rainsford@ihug.com.au> wrote in message
> news:D gm5h4$u4p$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
> > Mohammed,
> >
> > The short answer is NO. The kind of "converter" that you are using or
> > intending to use is totally unsuitable for use with the plug pack type
of
> > power supply that you have with your router.
> >
> > Electrically, the power supply is designed for alternating current as
> > supplied from the power outlet. The "converter" effectively chops the
> > mains
> > voltage from the power outlet into 1/2 and by doing so, makes it more
> > direct
> > current (DC) rather than alternating current (AC) as required by the
> > router
> > power supply.
> >
> > Continued use of such converters will damage the existing power supply
by
> > supplying the direct current to its internal transformer causing
excessive
> > overheating and no doubt, ultimately, a fire. The are designed for use
> > with
> > some electric shavers and small table lamps only. Note that their use in
> > many countries is prohibited because of the safety risks that you are
> > encountering.
> >
> > Jeff and other above have advised correctly that you obtain a new and
> > correct power supply for the router and do not use the existing power
> > supply
> > with a "converter". It is a very dangerous practice to continue. You are
> > very lucky that you have not caused a serious fire by now with its use.
> >
> > Again, DO NOT USE A "CONVERTER" WITH THE EXISTING POWER SUPPLY.
> >
> > It is far too dangerous.
> >
> > Peter
> >
> > "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> > news:cpmXe.77441$2n6.2137@fe3.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> >> Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing
convertor
> > im
> >> currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router
> > though.
> >>
> >
http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...
> > ncoding=UTF8
> >>
> >> Will that one be ok with the router?
> >>
> >> On the power supply of the router it says:
> >> INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
> >> OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A
> >>
> >> Its not gonna work without the convertor right?
> >>
> >> I'm relaly concerned about the temperature the one I ordered doesnt
even
> >> have a black strip thing either.
> >>
> >>
> >> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> >> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> >> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
> >> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
> >> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This
power
> >> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this
is
> >> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the
> >> > convertor
> >> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing
Its
> >> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
> > should
> >> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
> > actual
> >> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it
is
> >> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But
I'm
> >> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched
for
> >> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into
a
> >> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical
socket
> >> > rather than two like everywhere else.
> >> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
> >> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
> >> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
> >> >
> >>
> >> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> >> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
> >> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
> >> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
> >> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This
power
> >> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this
is
> >> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the
> >> > convertor
> >> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing
Its
> >> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
> > should
> >> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
> > actual
> >> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it
is
> >> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But
I'm
> >> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched
for
> >> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged into
a
> >> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical
socket
> >> > rather than two like everywhere else.
> >> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
> >> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
> >> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
> >> >
> >>
> >>
> >
> >
>
>
September 20, 2005 11:37:23 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Thanks for your advice.
I just ordered this one:
http://www.maplin.co.uk/search.aspx?MenuNo=1277&MenuNam...

Will it be fine with the router?

"Pierre" <rainsford@ihug.com.au> wrote in message
news:D gn40b$m0o$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
> Does the "converter" have a D-Link branding label on it? I suspect not.
> Did
> you buy the router and converter together from a recognised D-Link agent
> in
> the U.K.? I suspect not.
> Legitimate D-Link suppliers in the UK would not supply such a unit and it
> is
> likely that someone may have brought them in from the USA quite
> independently. To the best of my knowledge, D-Link do not make or sell
> such
> a converter anywhere for that use.
>
> Perhaps you should go back to your supplier and confront them with the
> facts
> that they have advised you totally incorrectly and even dangerously.
>
> As before, DO NOT USE SUCH A CONVERTER, but get a correct supply for your
> router that is applicable for the mains voltage in the UK, preferably from
> a
> legitimate and knowledgable D-Link supplier.
>
> Peter
>
> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
> news:aOCXe.430$WV1.165@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> I dont understand why D-Link would supply this convertor with the router
> if
>> it was not suitable?
>> You say it will damage it but surely they would have known this? It is
>> extremely hot on the black area of the convertor though maybe its just
>> faulty?
>>
>>
>> "Pierre" <rainsford@ihug.com.au> wrote in message
>> news:D gm5h4$u4p$1@lust.ihug.co.nz...
>> > Mohammed,
>> >
>> > The short answer is NO. The kind of "converter" that you are using or
>> > intending to use is totally unsuitable for use with the plug pack type
> of
>> > power supply that you have with your router.
>> >
>> > Electrically, the power supply is designed for alternating current as
>> > supplied from the power outlet. The "converter" effectively chops the
>> > mains
>> > voltage from the power outlet into 1/2 and by doing so, makes it more
>> > direct
>> > current (DC) rather than alternating current (AC) as required by the
>> > router
>> > power supply.
>> >
>> > Continued use of such converters will damage the existing power supply
> by
>> > supplying the direct current to its internal transformer causing
> excessive
>> > overheating and no doubt, ultimately, a fire. The are designed for use
>> > with
>> > some electric shavers and small table lamps only. Note that their use
>> > in
>> > many countries is prohibited because of the safety risks that you are
>> > encountering.
>> >
>> > Jeff and other above have advised correctly that you obtain a new and
>> > correct power supply for the router and do not use the existing power
>> > supply
>> > with a "converter". It is a very dangerous practice to continue. You
>> > are
>> > very lucky that you have not caused a serious fire by now with its use.
>> >
>> > Again, DO NOT USE A "CONVERTER" WITH THE EXISTING POWER SUPPLY.
>> >
>> > It is far too dangerous.
>> >
>> > Peter
>> >
>> > "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
>> > news:cpmXe.77441$2n6.2137@fe3.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> >> Ok I decided to order this from Amazon to replace the existing
> convertor
>> > im
>> >> currently using which might be faulty. I did get it with the router
>> > though.
>> >>
>> >
> http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B0000TI46S/202...
>> > ncoding=UTF8
>> >>
>> >> Will that one be ok with the router?
>> >>
>> >> On the power supply of the router it says:
>> >> INPUT 100-120V-0.5A 50-60HZ
>> >> OUTPUT: +5.0V---3A
>> >>
>> >> Its not gonna work without the convertor right?
>> >>
>> >> I'm relaly concerned about the temperature the one I ordered doesnt
> even
>> >> have a black strip thing either.
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
>> >> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> >> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
>> >> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
>> >> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This
> power
>> >> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this
> is
>> >> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the
>> >> > convertor
>> >> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing
> Its
>> >> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
>> > should
>> >> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
>> > actual
>> >> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it
> is
>> >> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But
> I'm
>> >> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched
> for
>> >> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged
>> >> > into
> a
>> >> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical
> socket
>> >> > rather than two like everywhere else.
>> >> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
>> >> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
>> >> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >> "Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote in message
>> >> news:b5dXe.41669$k22.6984@fe2.news.blueyonder.co.uk...
>> >> > Is this normal? I'm in the UKand have three things plugged into the
>> >> > electrical socket on the wall. The first is the actual power supply
>> >> > adapter of the router which is fine in terms of temperature. This
> power
>> >> > supply is plugged into the a travel adapter convertor block and this
> is
>> >> > one that is really hot...I cant touch the black area on of the
>> >> > convertor
>> >> > for more than a few seconds. Its a brown travel adapter block thing
> Its
>> >> > what converts the voltage or something tor the UK, I dont think it
>> > should
>> >> > be this hot right? Although it only is hot on the back strip of the
>> > actual
>> >> > adapter and not all of it is this hot. I guess the black part of it
> is
>> >> > covered in some kind of coating to help reduce the temperature? But
> I'm
>> >> > still worried that it way too hot as the black part cant be touched
> for
>> >> > more than a few seconds. The travel adapter convertor is plugged
>> >> > into
> a
>> >> > socket convertor because UK uses three inputs for the electrical
> socket
>> >> > rather than two like everywhere else.
>> >> > The rotuer is a D Link 108ag wireless and probably from america. Its
>> >> > working fine and the comp has been on 24/7 for three weeks now since
>> >> > getting the router. But is it dangerous?
>> >> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >
>> >
>>
>>
>
>
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2005 11:37:24 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Sep 2005 20:51:57 GMT, "Mohammed"
<fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

>Thanks for your advice.
>I just ordered this one:
>http://www.maplin.co.uk/search.aspx?MenuNo=1277&MenuNam...
>
>Will it be fine with the router?

Probably not. There's no data on the current handling ability of that
device. My guess, based on a similar unit that I own, is that it can
only output about 1Amp maximum. You'll need about 2.5A rating for
this to work. I went throught the entire Maplin web site and couldn't
find anything that had the required current handling ability.



--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2005 11:37:24 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

"Mohammed" <fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:
>http://www.maplin.co.uk/search.aspx?MenuNo=1277&MenuNam...
>
>Will it be fine with the router?

That looks like it'll be fine, but PLEASE make sure you configure it
properly for voltage, polarity, and plug type/style before connecting
it to your router, or you may destroy the router.

If you have any questions after you've Read The Fine Manual, or are
not exactly certain you've configured it right, please ask for advice
before powering it up for the first time.

Once you've got it working, glue the plug adapter into position on the
cord, so it doesn't fall off and get reassembled with the reverse
polarity in the future.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2005 11:37:25 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

> Probably not. There's no data on the current handling ability of that
> device. My guess, based on a similar unit that I own, is that it can
> only output about 1Amp maximum. You'll need about 2.5A rating for
> this to work. I went throught the entire Maplin web site and couldn't
> find anything that had the required current handling ability.

Unfortunately, Maplin have done some wierd stuff with the website
regarding specifications, like plastic boxes but with no dimentions.
They'll tell me how much discount I get if I buy multiples but not the
size of the box! I have the paper catalogue (which should be redundant
but isn't).

Example choices are:-

PL61R 5V 2A
PJ85G 5V 2.5A
N92AT 5V 4A
N93AA which is called "world wide digital camera adaptor" which is rated
at 14.7VA max and does 5V (max is 7V @ 2.1A so on 5V should be fine)

The travel adaptor that Mohammed has ordered is rated at 1.6A with 240V
input and 1.2A @ 110V input when providing 4.5V output.

I'm wondering if that 2.5A is actually what the router requires or
whether the present PSU is just over rated.

Mohammed, if you want to, just return the one you've bought without
opening or you could try it. If you want to return it, you have the
legal right in the UK to do so within 7 days commencing the day after
you receive the item. This is covered by the "Distance Selling
Regulations". Note: The product wrapping must be unopened and you have
to pay the return postage. However I think you'll find that this one
comes in a box without shrink wrap. ;) 

David.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2005 11:37:25 AM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

William P. N. Smith <> wrote:
>That looks like it'll be fine

Oops, as Jeff pointed out, it may not (probably doesn't) have the
required current rating. Check the documentation when you get it!

Make sure you apply for a rebate of your advice fee. 8*)
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2005 1:05:10 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Mon, 19 Sep 2005 22:30:42 GMT, David Taylor <djtaylor@bigfoot.com>
wrote:

>I'm wondering if that 2.5A is actually what the router requires or
>whether the present PSU is just over rated.

The DI-624 does not draw 2.5A. That's the maximum rating of the power
adapter. Most of these wireless router boxes burn about 10 watts
which would make 2Amps a good guess. I don't think any of the 1.5 or
1.6A devices will work. It's also considered a bad idea to run the
wall warts at maximum power as the xformer cores tend to saturate
causing them to get rather hot.

Incidentally, the DI-624 has a reputation for getting rather hot
inside.
http://www.dslreports.com/forum/remark,11166456~mode=fl...
That makes me suspect that it might burn even more than the usual 10
watts. Oh-oh.


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
September 20, 2005 9:22:13 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Hi
Ok I just received this one in the mail today
http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=58...

I hooked it up and its working fine. The convertor is fine in terms of
temperature its not even warm. So I guess I got the right one finally? If
not will it blow up after continuous use or something?

<William P. N. Smith> wrote in message
news:1nfui1djrqa5eadv1embifp6m50ebkdste@4ax.com...
> William P. N. Smith <> wrote:
>>That looks like it'll be fine
>
> Oops, as Jeff pointed out, it may not (probably doesn't) have the
> required current rating. Check the documentation when you get it!
>
> Make sure you apply for a rebate of your advice fee. 8*)
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 20, 2005 9:22:14 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Tue, 20 Sep 2005 17:22:13 GMT, "Mohammed"
<fm004b8608@blueyonder.co.uk> wrote:

>Ok I just received this one in the mail today
>http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=58...
>
>I hooked it up and its working fine. The convertor is fine in terms of
>temperature its not even warm. So I guess I got the right one finally? If
>not will it blow up after continuous use or something?

That looks like a transformer instead of a resistor or diode.
However, the eBay page does not specifically say it's a transformer.
The other products offered are all transformers, so it's a fair bet
that this is also one. The ad claims it works to 100watts so the 10
watt drain of the DI-624 should be easily handled. If it feels like
it's made of iron or buzzes slightly, it's probably a transformer and
should work just fine. The main test is does anything get hot or
warm. If it's cold the way you describe, then it should work forever.

I wonder why they say it won't work with an x-box?


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2005 8:25:40 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

> The DI-624 does not draw 2.5A. That's the maximum rating of the power
> adapter. Most of these wireless router boxes burn about 10 watts

I know, that's why I asked if the actual current draw has been measured.

> which would make 2Amps a good guess. I don't think any of the 1.5 or
> 1.6A devices will work. It's also considered a bad idea to run the
> wall warts at maximum power as the xformer cores tend to saturate
> causing them to get rather hot.

Lose the transformer, use a SMPS instead :) 

Incidentally, did you mention somewhere that you'd run much more than
the stated 5V into a Netgear ME102? Maybe it was a Linksys, can't
remember now. I've just got hold of an ME102 but no PSU, I have plenty
at home, particularly 9V ones but no PSU. My choices are either to buy
a PSU or alternatively just bung a 7805 inside the unit somewhere.

David.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2005 8:25:41 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

David Taylor <djtaylor@bigfoot.com> wrote:
>Incidentally, did you mention somewhere that you'd run much more than
>the stated 5V into a Netgear ME102? Maybe it was a Linksys, can't

You'd probably want to pull the covers off it and check the circuitry.
Many of the Linksys boxes can run from near 4 volts to nearly 25 volts
(the limits are the drop-out voltage of the 3.3V regulator and the
power supply input capacitor rating). No idea how Netgear is
configured.

The nice thing about the Linksys boxes is that power supply current
drops as the voltage rises, so line losses can be correspondingly
lower.

Remind me sometime and I'll write up my "Power Over Cat5" conversion.
Also, look for a thread titled "Linksys Lies!" 8*)
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2005 8:25:41 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 16:25:40 GMT, David Taylor <djtaylor@bigfoot.com>
wrote:

>> The DI-624 does not draw 2.5A. That's the maximum rating of the power
>> adapter. Most of these wireless router boxes burn about 10 watts
>
>I know, that's why I asked if the actual current draw has been measured.

Yep. I have a "Kill-a-watt" contraption which is kinda handy.
http://www.p3international.com/products/special/P4400/P...
I use it to measure the current drain of AC appliances including wall
warts. My main interest is what do they draw when the device is OFF
which is totally wasted power. Also the power factor on some cheezy
UPS's make me ill. Right now, it's measuring the kw-hr use on my
cheap new refridgerator.

I also have an assortment of USB and power extensions, with breaks in
the power leads to allow me to measure the current drain with an amps
guesser.

>Lose the transformer, use a SMPS instead :) 

What's an SMPS? Oh, switch mode power supply. Yeah, that's the right
idea for directly powering the DI-624 from the AC mains. However, he
was looking for a "converter" and was not doing well on finding a
suitable replacmenet wall wart. So, the "converter" should be a
transformer, not a diode or dropping resistor.

>Incidentally, did you mention somewhere that you'd run much more than
>the stated 5V into a Netgear ME102?

Hell no. The ones that would tolerate a wide range of voltages were
the Linksys WRT4G, WAP54G, and BEFW11S4. All of these will run on
anything between about 4VDC and perhaps 18VDC. They have a nifty
switching supply inside the box which allows this type of operation.
I just happen to look at the guts of a DI-624 last week and noticed
that it also had a switcher. However, it was a tiny little thing
which made me worry about the range that it would handle. My guess is
that it might go down to 4VDC, but I'm not sure how high it will go.
I can trace out a schematic, but that would be too much work.

I just happen to have a Netgear ME102 in the pile. It's the original
version with the added USB cable. The power supply is a switcher
rated at 5VDC 1A. The guts are the same as a Linksys WAP11v1.1. I
also have a DLinks DWL-900AP (no +) version A1, which is exactly the
same guts, but with a much larger 5V 2A power adapter. I'll measure
the drain when I have time.

>Maybe it was a Linksys, can't
>remember now.

It was Linksys. Use Google Groups search.

>I've just got hold of an ME102 but no PSU, I have plenty
>at home, particularly 9V ones but no PSU. My choices are either to buy
>a PSU or alternatively just bung a 7805 inside the unit somewhere.

The connector on the ME102 is rather odd. You might have trouble
finding a replacment. I don't wanna tear it apart quite yet (not sure
who owns it yet) or experiment with it. Therefore, I suggest going
with the stock replacement.
Netgear P/N PWR-050-111
Model: ADP-5DB
Delta Electronics: 91-56062
Input: AC 100-120V 14VA
Output: 5V 1.0A
All bets are off if you have a later version of the ME102 which
probably has a different connector and possibly different adapter.



--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2005 8:25:42 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 13:04:10 -0400, William P. N. Smith <> wrote:

>Many of the Linksys boxes can run from near 4 volts to nearly 25 volts
>(the limits are the drop-out voltage of the 3.3V regulator and the
>power supply input capacitor rating). No idea how Netgear is
>configured.

The LM2941 regulator in the Linksys WRT54G, WAP54g, and BEFW11S4v4,
has an absolute max input voltage of 26v. I think (not sure) that the
input capacitor is also 25VDC but can't tell from the markings. I
would aim for running it on about 12-15 volts, which seems like a safe
region. The common 19VDC laptop power supply seems about right
including CAT5 copper losses. I run mine on a gel cell (instant UPS)
and slow pulse charger which runs at about 14.4VDC. I wished all such
boxes were so easy to power.

http://cache.national.com/ds/LM/LM2941.pdf


--
Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
Skype: JeffLiebermann AE6KS 831-336-2558
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2005 9:26:24 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

> You'd probably want to pull the covers off it and check the circuitry.
> Many of the Linksys boxes can run from near 4 volts to nearly 25 volts
> (the limits are the drop-out voltage of the 3.3V regulator and the
> power supply input capacitor rating). No idea how Netgear is
> configured.

Nor me yet. Like I said, I might just bung a 7805 in a spare 9V PSU and
have done with it. :) 

David.
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
September 21, 2005 10:12:50 PM

Archived from groups: (More info?)

In article <qd53j11s1mrhiqnn0tp9g8g1sfk2m1dbn5@4ax.com>,
jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us says...
> On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 16:25:40 GMT, David Taylor <djtaylor@bigfoot.com>
> wrote:
>
> >> The DI-624 does not draw 2.5A. That's the maximum rating of the power
> >> adapter. Most of these wireless router boxes burn about 10 watts
> >
> >I know, that's why I asked if the actual current draw has been measured.
>
> Yep. I have a "Kill-a-watt" contraption which is kinda handy.
> http://www.p3international.com/products/special/P4400/P...
> I use it to measure the current drain of AC appliances including wall
> warts. My main interest is what do they draw when the device is OFF
> which is totally wasted power. Also the power factor on some cheezy
> UPS's make me ill. Right now, it's measuring the kw-hr use on my
> cheap new refridgerator.
>
> I also have an assortment of USB and power extensions, with breaks in
> the power leads to allow me to measure the current drain with an amps
> guesser.
>
> >Lose the transformer, use a SMPS instead :) 
>
> What's an SMPS? Oh, switch mode power supply. Yeah, that's the right
> idea for directly powering the DI-624 from the AC mains. However, he
> was looking for a "converter" and was not doing well on finding a
> suitable replacmenet wall wart. So, the "converter" should be a
> transformer, not a diode or dropping resistor.
>
> >Incidentally, did you mention somewhere that you'd run much more than
> >the stated 5V into a Netgear ME102?
>
> Hell no. The ones that would tolerate a wide range of voltages were
> the Linksys WRT4G, WAP54G, and BEFW11S4. All of these will run on
> anything between about 4VDC and perhaps 18VDC. They have a nifty
> switching supply inside the box which allows this type of operation.
> I just happen to look at the guts of a DI-624 last week and noticed
> The connector on the ME102 is rather odd. You might have trouble
> finding a replacment. I don't wanna tear it apart quite yet (not sure
> who owns it yet) or experiment with it. Therefore, I suggest going
> with the stock replacement.

It's the early USB one, if I can't find a connector around the house
then i'll just hard wire my bodged and 7805 equipped adaptor. :) 
Anything else and i'm liable to end up paying more for the thing than
it's worth.

David.
!