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WiFi question

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Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 11, 2005 3:41:32 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I have seen on ebay some SD memory cards with built in WiFi.

Can someone tell me what this WiFi thing is all about.
What does it do exactly?
Where can it be used?
What does it cost to use it?

More about : wifi question

Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 11, 2005 8:07:55 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Wifi is the wireless networking. The short answer to your question is, you
can go to many coffee houses, restaurants, and most airports - anyplace
advertising "wifi hotspots"... and you get free internet access. You can
also get a wifi router for your home internet connection, but it's kinda
pointless since you'd probably rather use your computer at home.

"Triker" <nodontemailme@no.com> wrote in message
news:420c612e$1@news.greennet.net...
> I have seen on ebay some SD memory cards with built in WiFi.
>
> Can someone tell me what this WiFi thing is all about.
> What does it do exactly?
> Where can it be used?
> What does it cost to use it?
>
>
February 11, 2005 8:16:41 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Triker wrote:
> I have seen on ebay some SD memory cards with built in WiFi.
>
> Can someone tell me what this WiFi thing is all about.

It's nothing more than a wireless network card like the one you might have
in your desktop computer.

> What does it do exactly?

Enables you to connect your PPC to a Local Area Network.

> Where can it be used?

In your home, if you have set up a wireless network of some sort. In
public hotspots which are essentially LANs to which anyone can connect.

> What does it cost to use it?

Nothing more than your usual Internet connection fees that you're already
paying at home. Free, if your employer offers it. Often free of charge in
public hotspots as well (airports, city centers, hotels and such[1]). Some
charge though I have no idea how much (Starbucks for instance).

[1] "hotels and such" is a phrase which here means "places of upscale
lodging like American Bed and Breakfasts ... see for instance
www.threeoaks-marshall.com )

--
Als root können Sie alles machen -- auch kaputt.
Internet Professionell, 1/2005
Related resources
February 11, 2005 4:16:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Edward L. Mann wrote:
> Wifi is the wireless networking. The short answer to your question
> is, you can go to many coffee houses, restaurants, and most airports
> - anyplace advertising "wifi hotspots"... and you get free internet
> access. You can also get a wifi router for your home internet
> connection, but it's kinda pointless since you'd probably rather use
> your computer at home.

Well, not really. I use my PDA with wifi a lot at home. I can sit in any
room and check my email, browse NGs etc.
'Specially if the kids are on the PCs.

Regards

Martin
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 11, 2005 6:13:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

I like the idea of it being free. I like the idea of being able to get on
line while away from home too. These HotSpots, how near to them do you have
to be to the hotspot for it still to work? Could you get on line for
instance, if you were camping in a field somewhere, or just in a town centre
location? How do you know if you are near to a hotspot?



"Edward L. Mann" <guedo_sarragucci@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:K4XOd.63432$eT5.23161@attbi_s51...
> Wifi is the wireless networking. The short answer to your question is,
you
> can go to many coffee houses, restaurants, and most airports - anyplace
> advertising "wifi hotspots"... and you get free internet access. You can
> also get a wifi router for your home internet connection, but it's kinda
> pointless since you'd probably rather use your computer at home.
>
> "Triker" <nodontemailme@no.com> wrote in message
> news:420c612e$1@news.greennet.net...
> > I have seen on ebay some SD memory cards with built in WiFi.
> >
> > Can someone tell me what this WiFi thing is all about.
> > What does it do exactly?
> > Where can it be used?
> > What does it cost to use it?
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 11, 2005 6:29:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"René" <kar98@the-coalition.us> wrote in message
news:ZcXOd.46346$iC4.20733@newssvr30.news.prodigy.com...
> Triker wrote:
> > I have seen on ebay some SD memory cards with built in WiFi.
> >
> > Can someone tell me what this WiFi thing is all about.
>
> It's nothing more than a wireless network card like the one you might have
> in your desktop computer.
>
> > What does it do exactly?
>
> Enables you to connect your PPC to a Local Area Network.
>
> > Where can it be used?
>
> In your home, if you have set up a wireless network of some sort. In
> public hotspots which are essentially LANs to which anyone can connect.

These public hotspots to which anyone can connect. How popular are these in
England. are they to be found all over the place, or do you only find them
airports, city centres ect?



> > What does it cost to use it?
>
> Nothing more than your usual Internet connection fees that you're already
> paying at home. Free, if your employer offers it. Often free of charge in
> public hotspots as well (airports, city centers, hotels and such[1]). Some
> charge though I have no idea how much (Starbucks for instance).

So if some of them you have to pay to use them, how would that work out in
practice if you found yourself in a place where you had to pay, but your
were not already subscribed to it?



> [1] "hotels and such" is a phrase which here means "places of upscale
> lodging like American Bed and Breakfasts ... see for instance
> www.threeoaks-marshall.com )

These "hotels and such" that have WiFi, does that meen that they have to
give your some sort user name and password to be able to use their WiFi ?
February 11, 2005 9:13:21 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Triker wrote:
> These public hotspots to which anyone can connect. How popular are
> these in England.

I wouldn't know. I'm in Texas :-)

>> Nothing more than your usual Internet connection fees that you're
>> already paying at home. Free, if your employer offers it. Often free
>> of charge in public hotspots as well (airports, city centers, hotels
>> and such[1]). Some charge though I have no idea how much (Starbucks
>> for instance).
>
> So if some of them you have to pay to use them, how would that work out
> in practice if you found yourself in a place where you had to pay, but
> your were not already subscribed to it?

Like at Starbucks, you have to put in a username and password. Minutes or
kilobytes are taken from your pre-paid card, available at Starbucks.


>> [1] "hotels and such" is a phrase which here means "places of upscale
>> lodging like American Bed and Breakfasts ... see for instance
>> www.threeoaks-marshall.com )
>
> These "hotels and such" that have WiFi, does that meen that they have to
> give your some sort user name and password to be able to use their WiFi

Either that, or open them up for everybody. Administration is a bit tricky
either way, but nothing too complicated.
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 11, 2005 10:22:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

How about watching your films AVI or DVD with PPC keeping them on PC?

"Edward L. Mann" <guedo_sarragucci@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:K4XOd.63432$eT5.23161@attbi_s51...
> Wifi is the wireless networking. The short answer to your question is,
you
> can go to many coffee houses, restaurants, and most airports - anyplace
> advertising "wifi hotspots"... and you get free internet access. You can
> also get a wifi router for your home internet connection, but it's kinda
> pointless since you'd probably rather use your computer at home.
>
> "Triker" <nodontemailme@no.com> wrote in message
> news:420c612e$1@news.greennet.net...
> > I have seen on ebay some SD memory cards with built in WiFi.
> >
> > Can someone tell me what this WiFi thing is all about.
> > What does it do exactly?
> > Where can it be used?
> > What does it cost to use it?
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 12, 2005 12:34:25 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"Triker" <nodontemailme@no.com> wrote in message
news:420d066f@news.greennet.net...

> I like the idea of it being free. I like the idea of being able to get on
> line while away from home too. These HotSpots, how near to them do you
have
> to be to the hotspot for it still to work? Could you get on line for
> instance, if you were camping in a field somewhere, or just in a town
centre
> location? How do you know if you are near to a hotspot?

There have been attempts to generate markings similar to "hobo signs" to
show where hot spots are. I don't know that there's an 'official' mark yet.
Look around for lots of laptop users, that's a way to tell. I suspect
McDonalds has wifi in their new/renovated stores now, since every time I go
to one there are laptop users everywhere. Ask a laptop user if they have
wifi there.

I've never heard of places that charge for wifi, but everyone else here has
aparently. Most places I've been to have it free, as a 'value-added
service' model; that is, you get to use it free of charge, but you're
*supposed* to patronize the restaurant/coffee house/etc in exchange. (like
Barnes&Nobles book stores, where instead of buying the books, you can read
them for free [like a private library] but are expected to buy overpriced
coffee)

Hotspots are everywhere around college campuses, since they want students to
meet to do homework there. Colleges are also installing them in all their
buildings; there is a pub next door to a campus building where I used to
live, and until they decided to put a password on the connection, patrons of
the pub could use the campus wifi even if they weren't students.

I haven't tried using wifi in Europe, but from what I've heard they were
popular in Europe before they caught on here in the USA, so I'd suspect they
are common around you. Again, I'd ask a laptop user, they usually know.
I'm awaiting a relocation in my job; if I get relocated to a big city, I'm
going to get a SD wifi card myself. If I get stuck in the middle of
nowhere, I'm not going to bother. If you get one, check out the ones that
are combo storage/wifi cards.
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 12, 2005 12:36:46 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"Amirov Zakhar" <amirov@tric.ru> wrote in message
news:uqhpMzDEFHA.1012@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> How about watching your films AVI or DVD with PPC keeping them on PC?

Why would you want to watch a film on a 200x300 resolution 3" screen instead
of on a TV or computer monitor?
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 12, 2005 1:24:11 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Reply to message from "Edward L. Mann" <guedo_sarragucci@yahoo.com> (Fri,
11 Feb 2005 16:36:46) about ""Re: WiFi question"":



> Why would you want to watch a film on a
> 200x300 resolution 3" screen instead of on a TV or computer monitor?

Because the cord on the tv keeps tripping me up otherwise ? ;) 

Using that logic, why would anyone want an ipod when a home stereo can be
bought with the same money? Yet the market has proven otherwise...
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 12, 2005 3:33:03 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

In derect view without any obstacles (even usual glass can be such)- 300m
usual
but dont expect more than 100m.
Actually you can try to use external antenna so it can be up to 500m, but
it's too inconveniently.

To find hotspot you can just turn WiFi on and move through city. When one
will be available
you will see message about it, just look around and find derection where
signal level will increase and etc. If it will be free hotspot you need not
do something it will connect automatically, just find comfortable place and
use it :) 
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 13, 2005 8:34:18 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

See:
http://netscape.com.com/2100-1009_22-939483.html
and
http://www.wi-fihotspotlist.com/

"Edward L. Mann" <guedo_sarragucci@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Bx9Pd.57960$yY6.53530@attbi_s02...
> "Triker" <nodontemailme@no.com> wrote in message
> news:420d066f@news.greennet.net...
>
> > I like the idea of it being free. I like the idea of being able to get
on
> > line while away from home too. These HotSpots, how near to them do you
> have
> > to be to the hotspot for it still to work? Could you get on line for
> > instance, if you were camping in a field somewhere, or just in a town
> centre
> > location? How do you know if you are near to a hotspot?
>
> There have been attempts to generate markings similar to "hobo signs" to
> show where hot spots are. I don't know that there's an 'official' mark
yet.
> Look around for lots of laptop users, that's a way to tell. I suspect
> McDonalds has wifi in their new/renovated stores now, since every time I
go
> to one there are laptop users everywhere. Ask a laptop user if they have
> wifi there.
>
> I've never heard of places that charge for wifi, but everyone else here
has
> aparently. Most places I've been to have it free, as a 'value-added
> service' model; that is, you get to use it free of charge, but you're
> *supposed* to patronize the restaurant/coffee house/etc in exchange.
(like
> Barnes&Nobles book stores, where instead of buying the books, you can read
> them for free [like a private library] but are expected to buy overpriced
> coffee)
>
> Hotspots are everywhere around college campuses, since they want students
to
> meet to do homework there. Colleges are also installing them in all their
> buildings; there is a pub next door to a campus building where I used to
> live, and until they decided to put a password on the connection, patrons
of
> the pub could use the campus wifi even if they weren't students.
>
> I haven't tried using wifi in Europe, but from what I've heard they were
> popular in Europe before they caught on here in the USA, so I'd suspect
they
> are common around you. Again, I'd ask a laptop user, they usually know.
> I'm awaiting a relocation in my job; if I get relocated to a big city, I'm
> going to get a SD wifi card myself. If I get stuck in the middle of
> nowhere, I'm not going to bother. If you get one, check out the ones that
> are combo storage/wifi cards.
>
>
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 3:49:37 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"Amirov Zakhar" <amirov@tric.ru> wrote in message
news:eWxBjgGEFHA.624@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> In derect view without any obstacles (even usual glass can be such)- 300m
> usual
> but dont expect more than 100m.
> Actually you can try to use external antenna so it can be up to 500m, but
> it's too inconveniently.
>
> To find hotspot you can just turn WiFi on and move through city. When one
> will be available
> you will see message about it, just look around and find derection where
> signal level will increase and etc. If it will be free hotspot you need
not
> do something it will connect automatically, just find comfortable place
and
> use it :) 
>

Thanks for telling me that. The more you guys tell me about this WiFi thing
the more interested I'm getting. I have just bought a WiFi sd card on ebay,
so I'm going to give it a go. I slipped up though when I bought it, I
thought I was biding on the one with the 256 mb memory on it, but after
winning the thing I then noticed I have bided on one with no memory on it,
so I'm a bit annoyed about doing that.

Now if I had actually won the one with memory on, I could have installed my
Tom-Tom navigator on it and had WiFi on as well.
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 3:59:19 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"Edward L. Mann" <guedo_sarragucci@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:Bx9Pd.57960$yY6.53530@attbi_s02...
> "Triker" <nodontemailme@no.com> wrote in message
> news:420d066f@news.greennet.net...
>
> > I like the idea of it being free. I like the idea of being able to get
on
> > line while away from home too. These HotSpots, how near to them do you
> have
> > to be to the hotspot for it still to work? Could you get on line for
> > instance, if you were camping in a field somewhere, or just in a town
> centre
> > location? How do you know if you are near to a hotspot?
>
> There have been attempts to generate markings similar to "hobo signs" to
> show where hot spots are. I don't know that there's an 'official' mark
yet.
> Look around for lots of laptop users, that's a way to tell. I suspect
> McDonalds has wifi in their new/renovated stores now, since every time I
go
> to one there are laptop users everywhere. Ask a laptop user if they have
> wifi there.
>
> I've never heard of places that charge for wifi, but everyone else here
has
> aparently. Most places I've been to have it free, as a 'value-added
> service' model; that is, you get to use it free of charge, but you're
> *supposed* to patronize the restaurant/coffee house/etc in exchange.
(like
> Barnes&Nobles book stores, where instead of buying the books, you can read
> them for free [like a private library] but are expected to buy overpriced
> coffee)
>
> Hotspots are everywhere around college campuses, since they want students
to
> meet to do homework there. Colleges are also installing them in all their
> buildings; there is a pub next door to a campus building where I used to
> live, and until they decided to put a password on the connection, patrons
of
> the pub could use the campus wifi even if they weren't students.
>
> I haven't tried using wifi in Europe, but from what I've heard they were
> popular in Europe before they caught on here in the USA, so I'd suspect
they
> are common around you. Again, I'd ask a laptop user, they usually know.
> I'm awaiting a relocation in my job; if I get relocated to a big city, I'm
> going to get a SD wifi card myself. If I get stuck in the middle of
> nowhere, I'm not going to bother. If you get one, check out the ones that
> are combo storage/wifi cards.
>


Thanks for telling me that. I think this WiFi thing will come in very
useful for me if I can find some hot spots round and about when I'm out.
Don't forget though, this is England, the country where nothing is free and
prices are always rip-off prices. There might not be too many free places
to find WiFi here. The kind of places you mentioned though probably will be
free here, I will have to wait and find out.

I have just bought a WiFi sd card on ebay, so I'm going to give it a go. I
slipped up though when I bought it, I
thought I was biding on the one with the 256 mb memory on it, but after
winning the thing I then noticed I have bided on one with no memory on it,
so I'm a bit annoyed about doing that.

Now if I had actually won the one with memory on, I could have installed my
Tom-Tom navigator on it and had WiFi on as well.
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 4:08:16 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

"René" <kar98@the-coalition.us> wrote in message
news:5B6Pd.8483$D34.2294@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
> Triker wrote:
> > These public hotspots to which anyone can connect. How popular are
> > these in England.
>
> I wouldn't know. I'm in Texas :-)
>
> >> Nothing more than your usual Internet connection fees that you're
> >> already paying at home. Free, if your employer offers it. Often free
> >> of charge in public hotspots as well (airports, city centers, hotels
> >> and such[1]). Some charge though I have no idea how much (Starbucks
> >> for instance).
> >
> > So if some of them you have to pay to use them, how would that work out
> > in practice if you found yourself in a place where you had to pay, but
> > your were not already subscribed to it?
>
> Like at Starbucks, you have to put in a username and password. Minutes or
> kilobytes are taken from your pre-paid card, available at Starbucks.
>
>
> >> [1] "hotels and such" is a phrase which here means "places of upscale
> >> lodging like American Bed and Breakfasts ... see for instance
> >> www.threeoaks-marshall.com )
> >
> > These "hotels and such" that have WiFi, does that meen that they have to
> > give your some sort user name and password to be able to use their WiFi
>
> Either that, or open them up for everybody. Administration is a bit tricky
> either way, but nothing too complicated.
>

I found this in intersting.
http://www.wi-fihotspotlist.com/faq.html
What is Wi Fi?
A way to get Internet access, the term Wi Fi is a play upon the decades-old
term HiFi that describes the type of output generated by quality musical
hardware, Wi Fi stands for Wireless Fidelity and is used to define any of
the wireless technology in the IEEE 802.11 specification - including (but
not necessarily limited to) the wireless protocols 802.11a, 802.11b, and
802.11g. The Wi-Fi Alliance is the body responsible for promoting the term
and its association with various wireless technology standards.
What is a Wi Fi Hotspot?
A Wi Fi hotspot is defined as any location in which 802.11 (wireless)
technology both exists and is available for use to consumers. In some cases
the wireless access is free, and in others, wireless carriers charge for Wi
Fi usage. Generally, the most common usage of Wi Fi technology is for laptop
users to gain Internet access in locations such as airports, coffee shops,
and so on, where Wi Fi technology can be used to help consumers in their
pursuit of work-based or recreational Internet usage.
How Can I Use Wi Fi?
You must be using a computer or PDA that has Wi Fi connectivity already
working. Most portable computers can add Wi Fi using an adapter that plugs
into a PC card slot or USB port.
Will I need to have an account with a Wi Fi service provider?
Generally, no. You should be able to sign up with the provider at the
location. Many providers will display instructions when browser software
opens on a WiFi-enabled computer. If you don't have an account, simply start
your computer and make sure your Wi Fi card is plugged on. Then, open a
browser.
Is Wi Fi the same as Bluetooth?
No. While both are wireless technology terms, Bluetooth technology lives
under the IEEE protocol 802.15.1, while Wi Fi falls under the 802.11
specification. What this means for consumers is that appliances using Wi Fi
technology and those using Bluetooth technology are not interoperable.
Bluetooth and Wi Fi are different in several ways, and are not necessarily
in competition. Wi Fi technology boasts faster data transfer speeds and
range, making it a good replacement for Ethernet (802.3) systems, while
Bluetooth requires less power and is therefore more prominent in small
appliances, such
Anonymous
a b } Memory
February 14, 2005 3:12:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.pocketpc (More info?)

Excellent post. Many thanks, have learnt loads.
Josie

"Edward L. Mann" <guedo_sarragucci@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:ucMPd.62130$yY6.58431@attbi_s02...
> See:
> http://netscape.com.com/2100-1009_22-939483.html
> and
> http://www.wi-fihotspotlist.com/
>
> "Edward L. Mann" <guedo_sarragucci@yahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:Bx9Pd.57960$yY6.53530@attbi_s02...
>> "Triker" <nodontemailme@no.com> wrote in message
>> news:420d066f@news.greennet.net...
>>
>> > I like the idea of it being free. I like the idea of being able to get
> on
>> > line while away from home too. These HotSpots, how near to them do you
>> have
>> > to be to the hotspot for it still to work? Could you get on line for
>> > instance, if you were camping in a field somewhere, or just in a town
>> centre
>> > location? How do you know if you are near to a hotspot?
>>
>> There have been attempts to generate markings similar to "hobo signs" to
>> show where hot spots are. I don't know that there's an 'official' mark
> yet.
>> Look around for lots of laptop users, that's a way to tell. I suspect
>> McDonalds has wifi in their new/renovated stores now, since every time I
> go
>> to one there are laptop users everywhere. Ask a laptop user if they have
>> wifi there.
>>
>> I've never heard of places that charge for wifi, but everyone else here
> has
>> aparently. Most places I've been to have it free, as a 'value-added
>> service' model; that is, you get to use it free of charge, but you're
>> *supposed* to patronize the restaurant/coffee house/etc in exchange.
> (like
>> Barnes&Nobles book stores, where instead of buying the books, you can
>> read
>> them for free [like a private library] but are expected to buy overpriced
>> coffee)
>>
>> Hotspots are everywhere around college campuses, since they want students
> to
>> meet to do homework there. Colleges are also installing them in all
>> their
>> buildings; there is a pub next door to a campus building where I used to
>> live, and until they decided to put a password on the connection, patrons
> of
>> the pub could use the campus wifi even if they weren't students.
>>
>> I haven't tried using wifi in Europe, but from what I've heard they were
>> popular in Europe before they caught on here in the USA, so I'd suspect
> they
>> are common around you. Again, I'd ask a laptop user, they usually know.
>> I'm awaiting a relocation in my job; if I get relocated to a big city,
>> I'm
>> going to get a SD wifi card myself. If I get stuck in the middle of
>> nowhere, I'm not going to bother. If you get one, check out the ones
>> that
>> are combo storage/wifi cards.
>>
>>
>
>
!