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CPU Removal

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October 30, 2006 1:12:52 AM

Most people say that the best way to remove the HS/F (AM2 64 3500+ CPU) from the MB is too slightly/gently twist the HS/F either way and break the thermal paste bond.

I'am not saying this is the wrong way, but a PC store technician said the way they do it, is to gently pull theHS/F plus CPU from the MB and then remove the CPU from the HS.

What do you think,

Thanks,

More about : cpu removal

October 30, 2006 1:24:52 AM

I disagree. Unless your HSF lets you access the little lever to flip it up, I don't see that as being the best way to do it...
October 30, 2006 1:27:24 AM

i also disagree having the cpu hanging off the end of your heat sink aint really all that safe, theirs a good chance that the thing could just fall off when removing it that way. the safest way to do it is to twist the heat sink just like you said
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October 30, 2006 1:34:25 AM

On the other hand, the guy at the shop is perfectly willing to sell you a new motherboard and/or CPU if you rip yours to shreds following his advice :twisted:
October 30, 2006 1:34:30 AM

Quote:
i also disagree having the cpu hanging off the end of your heat sink aint really all that safe, theirs a good chance that the thing could just fall off when removing it that way. the safest way to do it is to twist the heat sink just like you said

Good info, thanks.

Also, I forgot to mention that the technician said that twisting the HS/F even gently, could damage the CPU Pins and/or socket.
October 30, 2006 1:38:40 AM

Never really thought of like that, but i've been removing heat sinks from CPUs for awhile now and i never had any problems with damaging pins when removing heat sinks, unless you decide to go caveman on the cpu and start moving things forcefully you should be fine
October 30, 2006 2:04:25 AM

When the cpu is locked in place, it is not likely to have any potential for lateral movement. The only point that could see this kind of motion, is between chip and hsf.
Mind, if the shop only deals in Intel, you are far less likely to do damage to the bga by just pulling the two pieces out. Still, if you damage the chip lock, you are looking at a new mobo. I also dont like the idea of applying that much force, 90 degrees to the board.
Note. If you dont like either option, you can put the mobo, hsf, and chip in a plastic bag, and into the freezer. Then it would be much easier to separate the hsf.
October 30, 2006 2:22:39 AM

You have got to be kidding !!! I think sticking the motherboard in the freezer (although not necessarily harmful in itself) leaves you open to all kinds of terrible disasters... you go for some ice and the thing falls out on your feet... or maybe your room mate stuffs a frozen chicken in there are breaks a capacitor off !!! Eewwwwwww !!!

In my opinion, from having been around PC's for a few years myself "cough", is to twist gently backwards and forwards a few times and then lift up once you feel some 'give'. I've had chips come off with heatsinks and I don't like trying to scrape them off the heasink... I prefer them left on the board.

:wink:
October 30, 2006 3:03:34 AM

Quote:
Most people say that the best way to remove the HS/F (AM2 64 3500+ CPU) from the MB is too slightly/gently twist the HS/F either way and break the thermal paste bond.

I'am not saying this is the wrong way, but a PC store technician said the way they do it, is to gently pull theHS/F plus CPU from the MB and then remove the CPU from the HS.

What do you think,

Thanks,

HA !

That idiot who gave himself the title of "technician" deserves to be laughed at, crudely pulling the HSF AND CPU off the socket is the best way to rip pins off a CPU, there were a lot of threads started by people who did just that a short while ago and, in some cases, ended up with dead CPUs and/or motherboards due to breaking off an important pin or damaging the socket internal contacts.

Once the locking mechanism that binds the HSF to the motherboard is released, the best way to safely remove the HSF from the CPU is to gently twist the HSF left and right a few degrees until the the bond of TIM is broken, this works best when you proceed right after running the CPU under full load for a few minutes (obviously, shut down and unplug the system before doing so!).
October 30, 2006 3:34:07 AM

FYI using the freezer is a time honoured method of removing hs, and hsf on gfx cards. It works, for those who have no success with the twist method.
October 30, 2006 4:07:03 AM

I usually leave my old CPUs stuck to a heatsink, in case I want to walk up to someone and poke 478 tiny holes in their skin...more leverage ya know?
October 30, 2006 4:19:23 AM

Quote:
Most people say that the best way to remove the HS/F (AM2 64 3500+ CPU) from the MB is too slightly/gently twist the HS/F either way and break the thermal paste bond.

I'am not saying this is the wrong way, but a PC store technician said the way they do it, is to gently pull theHS/F plus CPU from the MB and then remove the CPU from the HS.

What do you think,

Thanks,


haha ... i know that feeling .....too many times i have removed the amd socket this way and pulled the cpu with it ...which is very bad for the mobo (and cpu) ..... you could damage the socket...or even loose same pins from the cpu....

the best way is to gently twist the heat sink a little bit to the left ..a little bit to the right.......it`s imposible to hurt the cpu as it is inserted in it`s socket ...... the socket not only connects the cpu electrically to the mobo but it also protects the cpu ...so once the cpu is out of it`s socket it becames vulnerable to mechanical and electromagnitic disturbances

the problem was spotted using original thermal compound ..many users simply remove that and use other compounds ....
October 30, 2006 4:33:33 AM

Quote:

HA !

That idiot who gave himself the title of "technician" deserves to be laughed at


i quess you need no diploma to do that...........kind of early to laugh though :mrgreen:
October 30, 2006 4:38:22 AM

Quote:
I usually leave my old CPUs stuck to a heatsink, in case I want to walk up to someone and poke 478 tiny holes in their skin...more leverage ya know?



when did socket 478s go out of style ;( looks at 1.8ghz p4 478
October 30, 2006 5:07:00 AM

I posted this once before, just take a short flat head screwdriver, rest the shank against something solid like the HSF mount, and put the tip just barely under one corner of the HSF and twist a smidge. It will pop off easily, no pulling the chip out and no damage to the chip.

I've done literally hundreds upon hundreds of chips this way, all types.

It's kinda like a suction cup, pull in the middle and it won't come off easily, pull a little at the edge and it comes right off :D 
!