partitions

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi there
I have just purchased a new dell computer it has a 140gb hard drive I would
like to partition this but unsure whether I have to reformat the whole drive
then have to reload windows. can anybody help please

Sue
18 answers Last reply
More about partitions
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Sue Davies wrote:
    > Hi there
    > I have just purchased a new dell computer it has a 140gb hard drive I would
    > like to partition this but unsure whether I have to reformat the whole drive
    > then have to reload windows. can anybody help please
    >
    > Sue
    >
    >

    If the drive is courrently one large partition, there is no way to
    repartition it using native Windows tools without deleting the existing
    partition, and creating and formating new partitions, and then
    reinstalling the OS and applications.

    There are, fortunately, quite a few 3rdparty products that can help you
    repartition the hard drive non-destructively. two such products are
    Partition Magic and BootItNG. The latter even has a free, fully
    functional 30-day evaluation version available for downloading from
    www.bootitng.com.


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:cLEud.402$WZ3.53@newsfe6-gui.ntli.net,
    Sue Davies <susan.davies1@ntlworld.com> typed:

    > I have just purchased a new dell computer it has a 140gb hard
    > drive I
    > would like to partition this but unsure whether I have to
    > reformat
    > the whole drive then have to reload windows. can anybody help
    > please


    First, a word on the terminology. It's already partitioned.
    Partitioning is the act of creating *one or more* partitions on a
    drive.

    So what you presumably want is to have more than one partition.
    Windows provides no way to change the partition structure of a
    drive non-destructively. You have two choices:

    1. Buy a third-party product such as Partition Magic or Boot-It
    Next Generation. Boot-It Next Generation is shareware and comes
    with a 30-day free trial, so if you only need to use it a single
    time, you could download and use it for this without actually
    buying it.

    2. Reformat and Reinstall Windows, as you suggest. If the
    computer is new, and you haven't put anything on the drive yet,
    that might be your easiest alternative.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:%239C8uvG4EHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:

    > In news:sKqdnas_Odze1ybcRVn-vQ@comcast.com,
    > Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:
    >
    >> In news:uybiy253EHA.2572@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl,
    >> Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:
    >>
    >>> In news:cLEud.402$WZ3.53@newsfe6-gui.ntli.net,
    >>> Sue Davies <susan.davies1@ntlworld.com> typed:
    >>>
    >>>> I have just purchased a new dell computer it has a 140gb hard
    >>>> drive I
    >>>> would like to partition this but unsure whether I have to
    >>>> reformat
    >>>> the whole drive then have to reload windows. can anybody help
    >>>> please
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> First, a word on the terminology. It's already partitioned.
    >>> Partitioning is the act of creating *one or more* partitions
    >>> on a
    >>> drive.
    >>>
    >>> So what you presumably want is to have more than one
    >>> partition.
    >>> Windows provides no way to change the partition structure of a
    >>> drive non-destructively. You have two choices:
    >>>
    >>> 1. Buy a third-party product such as Partition Magic or
    >>> Boot-It
    >>> Next Generation. Boot-It Next Generation is shareware and
    >>> comes
    >>> with a 30-day free trial, so if you only need to use it a
    >>> single
    >>> time, you could download and use it for this without actually
    >>> buying it.
    >>>
    >>> 2. Reformat and Reinstall Windows, as you suggest. If the
    >>> computer is new, and you haven't put anything on the drive
    >>> yet,
    >>> that might be your easiest alternative.
    >>
    >> If I may?
    >
    > Of course. Anyone is always welcome to jump in.
    >
    >> 3. Congratulate yourself on purchasing a product that actually
    >> ships
    >> with a full version of Windows XP as part of the software
    >> bundle.
    >
    > Although I basically agree with what you say below, a small but
    > important correction here: Dell computers don't ship with a Full
    > version of Windows, but with an OEM version. Although a complete
    > generic OEM version contains the same software as the Full
    > reatail version, it has the following disadvantages as compared
    > with it:
    >
    > 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    > installed on. It can never legally be moved to another computer,
    > sold, or given away.

    Ya know? You're not the first person to tell me that, but I found it to be
    untrue. (Except for the "legal" part.)

    I own three Dell machines, and one "other" that I built from scratch just to
    see if I could do it.

    Over the years I've had occasion to format and reinstall Windows on all four
    machines. In each case, I just picked a Dell reinsatallation CD at random.
    I have three of them. One came with each machine, and I've never had a
    problem installing the OS. Drivers are another story. The Dell driver
    disks *are* particular to the machine they come with depending on options,
    but I digress. All four machines are (or were) connected to the Internet on
    my little home network, they all got Windows automatic updates without a
    hitch, and I've never been bugged about activation.

    Now I suppose it's possible that just by dumb luck, I happened to pick up
    the "correct" reinstallation CD for a particular machine each time I
    formatted and reinstalled, but I doubt it. And besides? That wouldn't
    explain my "other" machine.

    The "other" machine originally had Win98-SE installed. The last time it
    started acting up (kids, what can ya do?) I decided to mess around and
    install XP on it using one of the Dell reinstallation disks. I never
    expected it to work, but guess what? It was online for just over four
    months, working perfectly, and happily getting it's auto-updates from
    Windows Update, etc. Even prompted me to install SP2, and never once did it
    ask me to activate. And I imagine it still *would* be online had the little
    bugger not decided to practice "bowling" in her room, and thought it would
    be OK to use the box as a backstop (It's made of metal, you know?) so the
    ball wouldn't, "hurt the wall"..... Like I said, kids.

    Granted. It probably was an illegal installation ... But Microsoft didn't
    seem to know or care that I had a "Dell-branded" version of XP installed on
    a machine that didn't have a single Dell component in it.

    Not trying to be a wise-guy, but .... How do you explain *that* one?

    > 2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.

    True.

    > 3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call
    > them with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support
    > from your OEM; that support may range anywhere between good and
    > non-existent. Or you can get support elsewhere, such as in these
    > newsgroups.

    True :-)

    <snip>

    Bill
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:Z-2dnS_64aDPEiHcRVn-ow@comcast.com,
    Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:

    > In news:%239C8uvG4EHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    > Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:

    >> Although I basically agree with what you say below, a small
    >> but
    >> important correction here: Dell computers don't ship with a
    >> Full
    >> version of Windows, but with an OEM version. Although a
    >> complete
    >> generic OEM version contains the same software as the Full
    >> reatail version, it has the following disadvantages as
    >> compared
    >> with it:
    >>
    >> 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    >> installed on. It can never legally be moved to another
    >> computer,
    >> sold, or given away.
    >
    > Ya know? You're not the first person to tell me that, but I
    > found it
    > to be untrue. (Except for the "legal" part.)


    It *is* true.

    There are many people who do things that are illegal (sometimes
    greatly so, sometimes more minor) and don't get caught. Some are
    bank robbers or murderers, others shoplift nickel and dime items.
    Still others only violate Microsoft license agreements.

    What you do or not is between you and the legal authorities (if
    you get caught), and between you and your conscience (if you
    don't).

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:OyxlQzH4EHA.1292@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:

    > In news:Z-2dnS_64aDPEiHcRVn-ow@comcast.com,
    > Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:
    >
    >> In news:%239C8uvG4EHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    >> Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:
    >
    >>> Although I basically agree with what you say below, a small
    >>> but
    >>> important correction here: Dell computers don't ship with a
    >>> Full
    >>> version of Windows, but with an OEM version. Although a
    >>> complete
    >>> generic OEM version contains the same software as the Full
    >>> reatail version, it has the following disadvantages as
    >>> compared
    >>> with it:
    >>>
    >>> 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    >>> installed on. It can never legally be moved to another
    >>> computer,
    >>> sold, or given away.
    >>
    >> Ya know? You're not the first person to tell me that, but I
    >> found it
    >> to be untrue. (Except for the "legal" part.)
    >
    >
    > It *is* true.
    >
    > There are many people who do things that are illegal (sometimes
    > greatly so, sometimes more minor) and don't get caught. Some are
    > bank robbers or murderers, others shoplift nickel and dime items.
    > Still others only violate Microsoft license agreements.
    >
    > What you do or not is between you and the legal authorities (if
    > you get caught), and between you and your conscience (if you
    > don't).

    Either you misunderstood me, or you didn't read my entire post. I wasn't
    advocating doing anything illegal. In fact? At the time I did what I did,
    I didn't even know it was "wrong". And yeah. If you wanna bust on me for
    not reading the EULA, fine. I didn't read it. Don't know many people who
    do. And I know ignorance isn't an excuse, etc.

    But I know better now, which is why after the kid get's the money together
    for a replacement NIC, audio card, and case (the bowling ball thing) the
    machine will go back online with 98SE installed.

    Geesh! Chill out, dude.

    The point was .... Dell *does* ship their machines with fully functional
    versions of WindowsXP.

    And I can't help what others do, or don't do, with them. All I'm saying is
    that in *my* case? Microsoft either had no way of knowing, or didn't care,
    that I (briefly) had one installed on a non-Dell-anything machine, and it
    worked perfectly for four months.

    I note that you've chosen not to answer as to how that could possibly be.

    HAND,
    Bill
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:pNqdnS19iL72ASHcRVn-pw@comcast.com,
    Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:

    >>> Ya know? You're not the first person to tell me that, but I
    >>> found it
    >>> to be untrue. (Except for the "legal" part.)
    >>
    >>
    >> It *is* true.

    ....

    > Microsoft either had no way of knowing,
    > or didn't care, that I (briefly) had one installed on a
    > non-Dell-anything machine, and it worked perfectly for four
    > months.
    >
    > I note that you've chosen not to answer as to how that could
    > possibly
    > be.


    The point I was trying to make is that Microsoft doesn't
    necessarily know everything you do; although sometimes you can
    get caught if you violate the EULA, most of the time it comes
    down to your own conscience. There are many examples of people
    violating the EULA, in many different ways, and getting away with
    it.

    I didn't say it was impossible to move an OEM product to another
    machine; I said "Its license ties it permanently to the first
    computer it's installed on. It can never legally be moved to
    another computer, sold, or given away." That's a statement about
    licensing and what's legal. It's not a statement about what it's
    possible to get away with doing.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:%23tkVt0I4EHA.3388@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:

    > In news:pNqdnS19iL72ASHcRVn-pw@comcast.com,
    > Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:
    >
    >>>> Ya know? You're not the first person to tell me that, but I
    >>>> found it
    >>>> to be untrue. (Except for the "legal" part.)
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> It *is* true.
    > ...
    >
    >> Microsoft either had no way of knowing,
    >> or didn't care, that I (briefly) had one installed on a
    >> non-Dell-anything machine, and it worked perfectly for four
    >> months.
    >>
    >> I note that you've chosen not to answer as to how that could
    >> possibly
    >> be.
    >
    >
    > The point I was trying to make is that Microsoft doesn't
    > necessarily know everything you do; although sometimes you can
    > get caught if you violate the EULA, most of the time it comes
    > down to your own conscience. There are many examples of people
    > violating the EULA, in many different ways, and getting away with
    > it.

    Agreed, and understood.

    > I didn't say it was impossible to move an OEM product to another
    > machine; I said "Its license ties it permanently to the first
    > computer it's installed on. It can never legally be moved to
    > another computer, sold, or given away." That's a statement about
    > licensing and what's legal. It's not a statement about what it's
    > possible to get away with doing.

    Yes. And if you look at what you quoted from me above, you'll see I
    "covered" that with, "(Except for the legal part)"

    You seemed to try and make the leap from me relating a personal experience,
    to (nearly) accusing me of advocating piracy. Something I do *NOT* condone,
    by the way.

    The point was, and still *IS* ..... Dell ships their machines with
    fully-functional versions of WindowsXP. The installation CDs are "tied" to
    Dell and Microsoft by license only. They will however, install the
    *complete* OS on *any* machine you put them in. And that's an undeniable
    fact.

    Having said that;

    *Should* you do it? No. You agreed *not* to in the EULA that hardly
    anybody reads.
    *Can* you do it? Yes.

    Certainly I'm not the first person to have discovered this?

    Bill
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:s7idnUh4a8qcICHcRVn-jA@comcast.com,
    Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:


    > You seemed to try and make the leap from me relating a personal
    > experience, to (nearly) accusing me of advocating piracy.
    > Something
    > I do *NOT* condone, by the way.


    If my message sounded accusatory, I apologize. It wasn't my
    intent. My statement about what one could get away with doing or
    not, were meant as generalizations, not to apply to you in
    particular.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    You know Bill, you're really getting to be a pain. If you'll go back and
    read Ken's words again, you'll see he said *that you can't do it legally*,
    not *that you can't do it*. Pay attention.

    "Bill" <Bill@no.invalid> wrote in message
    news:s7idnUh4a8qcICHcRVn-jA@comcast.com...
    > In news:%23tkVt0I4EHA.3388@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl,
    > Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:
    >
    > > In news:pNqdnS19iL72ASHcRVn-pw@comcast.com,
    > > Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:
    > >
    > >>>> Ya know? You're not the first person to tell me that, but I
    > >>>> found it
    > >>>> to be untrue. (Except for the "legal" part.)
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>> It *is* true.
    > > ...
    > >
    > >> Microsoft either had no way of knowing,
    > >> or didn't care, that I (briefly) had one installed on a
    > >> non-Dell-anything machine, and it worked perfectly for four
    > >> months.
    > >>
    > >> I note that you've chosen not to answer as to how that could
    > >> possibly
    > >> be.
    > >
    > >
    > > The point I was trying to make is that Microsoft doesn't
    > > necessarily know everything you do; although sometimes you can
    > > get caught if you violate the EULA, most of the time it comes
    > > down to your own conscience. There are many examples of people
    > > violating the EULA, in many different ways, and getting away with
    > > it.
    >
    > Agreed, and understood.
    >
    > > I didn't say it was impossible to move an OEM product to another
    > > machine; I said "Its license ties it permanently to the first
    > > computer it's installed on. It can never legally be moved to
    > > another computer, sold, or given away." That's a statement about
    > > licensing and what's legal. It's not a statement about what it's
    > > possible to get away with doing.
    >
    > Yes. And if you look at what you quoted from me above, you'll see I
    > "covered" that with, "(Except for the legal part)"
    >
    > You seemed to try and make the leap from me relating a personal
    experience,
    > to (nearly) accusing me of advocating piracy. Something I do *NOT*
    condone,
    > by the way.
    >
    > The point was, and still *IS* ..... Dell ships their machines with
    > fully-functional versions of WindowsXP. The installation CDs are "tied"
    to
    > Dell and Microsoft by license only. They will however, install the
    > *complete* OS on *any* machine you put them in. And that's an undeniable
    > fact.
    >
    > Having said that;
    >
    > *Should* you do it? No. You agreed *not* to in the EULA that hardly
    > anybody reads.
    > *Can* you do it? Yes.
    >
    > Certainly I'm not the first person to have discovered this?
    >
    > Bill
    >
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:uFik5WJ4EHA.3380@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    Larry <shelquis.delete@nospam.hotmail.com> typed:

    > You know Bill, you're really getting to be a pain. If you'll go back
    > and read Ken's words again, you'll see he said *that you can't do it
    > legally*, not *that you can't do it*. Pay attention.

    Pay attention?

    I'd suggest you take your own advice, as Ken doesn't seem to have a problem
    replying to me in a civil manner.

    Failing that? I'd suggest you ignore me in the future. No sense causing
    yourself any more pain.

    Bill
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:%23J5BfVJ4EHA.1204@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl,
    Ken Blake <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> typed:

    > In news:s7idnUh4a8qcICHcRVn-jA@comcast.com,
    > Bill <Bill@no.invalid> typed:
    >
    >
    >> You seemed to try and make the leap from me relating a personal
    >> experience, to (nearly) accusing me of advocating piracy.
    >> Something
    >> I do *NOT* condone, by the way.
    >
    >
    > If my message sounded accusatory, I apologize. It wasn't my
    > intent. My statement about what one could get away with doing or
    > not, were meant as generalizations, not to apply to you in
    > particular.

    Understood. :-)

    Bill
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Ken is very generous.

    "Bill" <Bill@no.invalid> wrote in message
    news:RoSdnWakkPy8XyHcRVn-ow@comcast.com...
    > In news:uFik5WJ4EHA.3380@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl,
    > Larry <shelquis.delete@nospam.hotmail.com> typed:
    >
    > > You know Bill, you're really getting to be a pain. If you'll go back
    > > and read Ken's words again, you'll see he said *that you can't do it
    > > legally*, not *that you can't do it*. Pay attention.
    >
    > Pay attention?
    >
    > I'd suggest you take your own advice, as Ken doesn't seem to have a
    problem
    > replying to me in a civil manner.
    >
    > Failing that? I'd suggest you ignore me in the future. No sense causing
    > yourself any more pain.
    >
    > Bill
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Hi there
    thanks very much for your answers. I hope now if I get in touch with dell
    and find out about o/s and wether I destroy my warranty by putting in more
    partitions.
    Any way it was great that Bill and Ken ironed out quite a few queries
    Thanks again sue
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    SNIP...

    > > that might be your easiest alternative.
    >
    > If I may?
    >
    > 3. Congratulate yourself on purchasing a product that actually ships with
    a
    > full version of Windows XP as part of the software bundle.

    I just purchased a Dell laptop and it did NOT come with a Windows CD but had
    the "reinstall" on a hidden partition. (HORRORS) There is no way provided
    to create a CD from the reinstall partition. They are using a Symantec
    program as a window into the reinstall partition.

    Even Dell now refuses to place a rebuild CD with some of their systems.
    Haven't called them yet to request a CD to be able to reinstall Windows but
    that is coming within the 30 day "trial" period for the computer otherwise
    they will get it back.


    SNIP...
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "LVTravel" <none@nothere.com> wrote in message
    news:10rpv33l3divo2c@corp.supernews.com...
    >
    > SNIP...
    >
    >> > that might be your easiest alternative.
    >>
    >> If I may?
    >>
    >> 3. Congratulate yourself on purchasing a product that actually ships with
    > a
    >> full version of Windows XP as part of the software bundle.
    >
    > I just purchased a Dell laptop and it did NOT come with a Windows CD but
    > had
    > the "reinstall" on a hidden partition. (HORRORS) There is no way
    > provided
    > to create a CD from the reinstall partition. They are using a Symantec
    > program as a window into the reinstall partition.
    >
    > Even Dell now refuses to place a rebuild CD with some of their systems.
    > Haven't called them yet to request a CD to be able to reinstall Windows
    > but
    > that is coming within the 30 day "trial" period for the computer otherwise
    > they will get it back.
    >
    >
    > SNIP...
    >

    And that's why one with any modicum of experience with Laptops and PCs
    should inquire to whether they get what they expect before going through the
    hassle of a possible return. I know Dell ships desktops with the install
    disk, but not certain notebooks.

    Your other alternative it going to Best Buy (no way in hell for me), or
    HP/Compaq, which NEVER gives install disks on any of their systems. I also
    feel in any case, that it is a waste of (paid for) drive space to have a
    installation partition ship as part of any deal, but one gets what they pay
    for!
  16. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Although I basically agree with what you say below, a small but
    important correction here: Dell computers don't ship with a Full
    version of Windows, but with an OEM version. Although a complete
    generic OEM version contains the same software as the Full
    reatail version, it has the following disadvantages as compared
    with it:

    1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    installed on. It can never legally be moved to another computer,
    sold, or given away.

    2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.

    3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't call
    them with a problem, but instead have to get any needed support
    from your OEM; that support may range anywhere between good and
    non-existent. Or you can get support elsewhere, such as in these
    newsgroups.


    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup

    ----------------------------------------------------------------

    1. Can we change the components of the PC (motherboard, processor, graphic
    card etc. )?

    2. Can the OEM be upgraded to future window versions (like ugradation to
    longhorn) ?

    Regards, Rohit
  17. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    In news:%23Bcj6bS4EHA.3120@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl,
    Rohit <rohitsahib@digitalanand.net> typed:

    >> Although I basically agree with what you say below, a small
    >> but
    >> important correction here: Dell computers don't ship with a
    >> Full
    >> version of Windows, but with an OEM version. Although a
    >> complete
    >> generic OEM version contains the same software as the Full
    >> reatail version, it has the following disadvantages as
    >> compared
    >> with it:
    >>
    >> 1. Its license ties it permanently to the first computer it's
    >> installed on. It can never legally be moved to another
    >> computer,
    >> sold, or given away.
    >>
    >> 2. It can only do a clean installation, not an upgrade.
    >>
    >> 3. Microsoft provides no support for OEM versions. You can't
    >> call
    >> them with a problem, but instead have to get any needed
    >> support
    >> from your OEM; that support may range anywhere between good
    >> and
    >> non-existent. Or you can get support elsewhere, such as in
    >> these
    >> newsgroups.

    > 1. Can we change the components of the PC (motherboard,
    > processor, graphic
    card etc. )?


    You can certainly change many components without its being
    considered a new computer. But there's a gray area here. Exactly
    what or how much you have to change before it's considered a new
    computer has never been officially defined by Microsoft. Some
    people claim it's the motherboard, others disagree.


    2. Can the OEM be upgraded to future window versions (like
    ugradation to
    longhorn) ?


    I can't predict for sure what rules Microsoft will impose for
    upgrades to Longhorn or any other new products. But if the past
    is any indication, the answer is definitely yes.

    --
    Ken Blake - Microsoft MVP Windows: Shell/User
    Please reply to the newsgroup
  18. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    I agree but nowhere on the WEB site does it state that they will ship any
    way other than the way they always have shipped them before. This was a
    total surprise to me after buying about 25 Dell laptops and notebooks in the
    past 3 years for a business and personal use. As before, I expected to have
    an OEM installation CD.


    "Tom" <noway@nothere.com> wrote in message
    news:uNZKG%23Q4EHA.3316@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >
    > "LVTravel" <none@nothere.com> wrote in message
    > news:10rpv33l3divo2c@corp.supernews.com...
    > >
    > > SNIP...
    > >
    > >> > that might be your easiest alternative.
    > >>
    > >> If I may?
    > >>
    > >> 3. Congratulate yourself on purchasing a product that actually ships
    with
    > > a
    > >> full version of Windows XP as part of the software bundle.
    > >
    > > I just purchased a Dell laptop and it did NOT come with a Windows CD but
    > > had
    > > the "reinstall" on a hidden partition. (HORRORS) There is no way
    > > provided
    > > to create a CD from the reinstall partition. They are using a Symantec
    > > program as a window into the reinstall partition.
    > >
    > > Even Dell now refuses to place a rebuild CD with some of their systems.
    > > Haven't called them yet to request a CD to be able to reinstall Windows
    > > but
    > > that is coming within the 30 day "trial" period for the computer
    otherwise
    > > they will get it back.
    > >
    > >
    > > SNIP...
    > >
    >
    > And that's why one with any modicum of experience with Laptops and PCs
    > should inquire to whether they get what they expect before going through
    the
    > hassle of a possible return. I know Dell ships desktops with the install
    > disk, but not certain notebooks.
    >
    > Your other alternative it going to Best Buy (no way in hell for me), or
    > HP/Compaq, which NEVER gives install disks on any of their systems. I also
    > feel in any case, that it is a waste of (paid for) drive space to have a
    > installation partition ship as part of any deal, but one gets what they
    pay
    > for!
    >
    >
    >
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