Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

Ease of transfering HDD's to a new build?

Last response: in Systems
Share
November 3, 2006 5:12:47 PM

My dilemma is that I want to upgrade now but with Vista coming out with a new file system I didn't want to use my new SATA HDD's yet so that way I wouldn't have to format again when Vista came out.

I have 2 EIDE drives now, would I be able to just stick them in my new build and have it boot up just as if it was my old system only better?

Then after Vista comes out I will pop the new drives in and have a fresh start.

Will this work??

ASUS P5W DH Deluxe
C2D E6600
Corsair 2GB
etc...
November 3, 2006 5:39:43 PM

are these secondary hds or are you putting the windows on it?
November 3, 2006 5:42:40 PM

vista does not have a new file system, that was cancelled I believe. Also given that they are giving out vouchers with new machines for vista upgrades it will be possible to transfer.
Related resources
November 3, 2006 5:45:01 PM

Well right now I have one HD with windows XP and the other is just for everything else... One is primary the other is secondary.

I just want to know if I can take my current Hd's out, build my new system, pop my current Hd's in and have it boot up or will it want to format and all that since it is a new MB and proc?

@13thmonkey... I do beleive that since Vista itself was pushed back the new file system is once again going to be included.
November 3, 2006 5:48:07 PM

whether it will work or not, its always a good idea to start with a fresh format anyway when you build a new computer. its not that big of a hassle. Especially since you already have a secondary hd, just back everything up on it. but, yes, i think it will boot up, but with stability problems and possible errors.
November 3, 2006 5:52:14 PM

Ok then so say I put in my new drives right off the bat and get a new start...

I will have all my info on my current secondary drive that I will want to transfer to the new system. Will I be able to plug in my current secondary to the new system with the 2 new SATA drives and transfer what I want and then take it out or will I have to make DVD backups of all my music, pictures and such?
November 3, 2006 5:58:12 PM

as far as i know, secondary hds can be plugged into any computer at any time with no problems. I've been doing it for years. As for transferring data between ide hds and sata hds, it should work fine, but i had a system when sata first came out, and it hated having a sata hd and a ide hd in at the same time. it wouldn't boot. so i had to get a second sata and it worked fine. i'm sure they have fixed that by now though.
November 3, 2006 6:11:37 PM

You will almost definitely get through the POST. (i.e. The motherboard will detect the drives at the hardware level, and if you poke around in the BIOS the drives will show up there.)

Most likely you will get the Windows logo and eventually get to the windows desktop, but you will (probably) be greated with a host of "new hardware found" messages, and a hardware manager full of exclaimation points telling you that there are bad drivers.

If you manage to unload all your old drivers and re-load all your new drivers, you will probably be in good shape.

HOWEVER... if your version of Windows is OEM (i.e. if your old PC was a Dell or Gateway, etc) then two things apply:

1) moving the OS to your new system is illegal
2) after moving the OS to the new computer, it may detect to much new hardware (over the legal limit), and either shut down or give you some obnoxious message that this is OEM software to be run on OIGINAL hardware only.
November 3, 2006 6:21:17 PM

well, i don't know about it being illegal, but i've built 3 computers with the windows xp service pack 1 disk that came with my dell like 4 or 5 years ago, and i've had no problems. the only thing that you have to do, is when you go to activate it, it may tell you that its over the limit. so you call up, tell them you just reformatted, and they give you a new key. simple.

Why would it be illegal? you own the computer and whats on it. why shouldn't you be able to use the windows cd for a different comp, assuming that you're not using it on both at the same time.
November 3, 2006 6:37:38 PM

It isn't an OEM version, it is a full version of XP Pro... The PC I have now is one that I also built.

I think the way to go would be to install the new drives to start and then plug in my secondary drive and transfer all my music, pics and whatnot to the new drives and then I will just have to format again when vista comes.
November 3, 2006 6:54:19 PM

Quote:
It isn't an OEM version, it is a full version of XP Pro... The PC I have now is one that I also built.

I think the way to go would be to install the new drives to start and then plug in my secondary drive and transfer all my music, pics and whatnot to the new drives and then I will just have to format again when vista comes.


As I said before, given that there are upgrade paths from xp to vista, I'm sure there'll be a conversion tool, especially as these upgrade paths are for MCE as well which for most MCE users (who are probably non-technical) would be beyond them. (apologies to all technical MCE users).

So I'd say your stuff is safe.

But just putting an old HDD into a new machine as the boot drive will result in a large number of complaints from windows and a potentially poorly installed system, although I have read threads of how to get around these. Then you could install vista over the top of xp as this appears to be a potential upgrade path.
November 3, 2006 6:56:50 PM

Quote:
well, i don't know about it being illegal, but i've built 3 computers with the windows xp service pack 1 disk that came with my dell like 4 or 5 years ago, and i've had no problems. the only thing that you have to do, is when you go to activate it, it may tell you that its over the limit. so you call up, tell them you just reformatted, and they give you a new key. simple.

Why would it be illegal? you own the computer and whats on it. why shouldn't you be able to use the windows cd for a different comp, assuming that you're not using it on both at the same time.


Its illegal because its is an OEM copy, for the Original Equipment. If they let you re-install on new mobo thats up to them, I expect they are just happy you have a license. This was argued out in a thread a few weeks ago. Thats why OEM disks are cheaper, because they are meant for use on that system only.
November 3, 2006 7:12:10 PM

Yeah, I'm arleady sorry I opened this can of worms again. But since it's open...

Quote:
Why would it be illegal?

Because it violates the agreement you made with Microsoft when you bought and started using that Dell.

Quote:
you own the computer and whats on it. why shouldn't you be able to use the windows cd for a different comp, assuming that you're not using it on both at the same time.

Who told you that you own what's on your computer? Whoever told you that lied. Most of the stuff on your hard drive belongs to somebody else and you are only allowed to use it (or view it or listen to it) according to a liscence agreement.

If you own the paperback version of "Harry Potter", are you entitled to a copy of the Hardcover, and the audio book version, and the large print version? (You know, one for the shelf, one for the car, one for the back pocket...) Maybe even a copy in another language? In reality, you are entitled to whatever is agreed upon between you and the publisher. Most of us don't know what that agreement is, or even that we made an agreement, be it books, music, or software.
November 3, 2006 7:47:15 PM

I have transfered HDs numorous times they shouldn't be any major problems.

A primary drive should transfer no problem. Windows will detect the new hardware when you boot up and install the nessary drivers. After that you are good to go. Once I transfered only the harddrive and sound card I had to a new build and windows wanted me to enter the security code again, but that is as bad of a problem that I have encountered.

The secondary drive can just be plugged in if you are transfering the primary drive too. If just the secondary is being transfered you will need to reinstall the programs for windows to recognize them as being installed. The install will see the program is already there and g by very quaickly since no data is installed.
November 3, 2006 7:50:39 PM

There were minor changes from RC2 that went to rtm, and file system wasn't one of them. Still NTFS.

However, the WGA might bite you...
November 3, 2006 7:57:13 PM

thanks, I thought WINfs had been canned for vista.
November 3, 2006 7:59:07 PM

I understand where you are going with this, but the book example is pretty ridiculous. How can you compare a physical book to a piece of software? I'm not asking for every different version of windows and to be able to use it in the car and all over the place. that was a joke. All i'm asking it that i be able to transfer it to my new computer, and i'll take it off the old computer. I think thats fair. its kinda like if you build cars. Yea theres no licsense agreements, but if you want to scrap your car and build a new one, you can pull the engine out of it and stick it in your new car. In this case you own the engine, so thats fine. In the case of software, you own that copy of software. I realize that you shouldn't be able to make copies of it or sell it, but just to transfer it to a new computer being illegal seems far fetched.

edit: and if you are correct, then its completely unfair, but they don't enforce it, so it doesn't really matter.
November 3, 2006 8:07:54 PM

nope you own a license with limitations, you do not 'own' the software.

from microsoft:
May I transfer software from one PC to another?
A. Again, this depends on the type of licence.

Pre-installed software
If the software is pre-installed, the software lives and dies with the PC and can never be transferred to another PC

Full packaged product
With full packaged product software bought from resellers, you can transfer the software to another PC. As long as it is uninstalled from the first PC and everything is transferred with it (the EULA, the COA, the CD and everything contained in the box). You can transfer the full packaged Product licence outside the organisation, as long as it is transferred complete with discs and documentation and the software is uninstalled from the original PC.

Volume licences
With Microsoft volume licence programmes, you can transfer the software from one PC to another, as long as you have uninstalled it from the first PC and you only use the permitted number of copies of each licensed product you have bought. Operating system licenses acquired through OEM, cannot be transferred, even if upgraded through a volume licence agreement.

For more information, please read this white paper which summarises Microsoft's transferring of licences.

Download the 'Principles of Transferring licences' as a Word document (56.5KB / 8 secs at 56 KBps)

http://www.microsoft.com/uk/licensing/faq/default.mspx
under legal questions.

Essentially OEM software is pre-installed (never mind that you are doing the installation) you are the system builder, you have built the system, thats it.
November 3, 2006 8:22:21 PM

ok. got it. heres a question. My windows cd is an actual windows xp cd that came with the computer, whereas today, have a backup disk that has windows and other crap in there. Is my cd that looks like a normal windows disk still considered oem, even though it appears to be retail? it doesn't have dell printed on the disk.
November 3, 2006 8:43:26 PM

If it came with the PC its OEM probably. Does it say on the disk (top left on an SP2 disk) for distribution with a new PC only... thats the sign of OEM.

On the other hand when you come to re-activate it and it prevents you, you can call and talk your way into a new activation key, at which point you can kind of assume the ms have accepted you continuing to use the license.
November 3, 2006 8:46:44 PM

Quote:
My dilemma is that I want to upgrade now but with Vista coming out with a new file system I didn't want to use my new SATA HDD's yet so that way I wouldn't have to format again when Vista came out.


What new file system?
November 3, 2006 8:52:36 PM

Sorry, this is really de-railing this thread, so this will be my last post on the subject... especially because it doesn't apply to the poster... he has the box version anyway.

Maybe the OEM agreement is not fair, but if we agree to it, then it's fair that they expect us to abide by the agreement.

I'm guessing that the CD contains an OEM vesion of WindowXP. It has slightly different code than the retail version (box version). The only difference is this very feature we are talking about... it's got the license restrictions built in so it checks your hardware to see that it hasn't changed very much.

Right click on "My Computer" and select "properties". See if the version of Windows running on your PC has the letters OEM in the registration number. If so, then that's what you have, be it on the original, on the hard drive, or on your backups.

BTW: just like in the book analogy, you DO own the CD and the hard drive... just not the contents thereof.

And believe me, I'm not casting any stones here. I don't care a bit if you rip off Microsoft. I also understand if you feel ripped off by their licensing restrictions. A "one at a time" license has an inherent sence of fairness to it. And I won't even biggin to tell you how fast and loose I've been w/ software. I just want people to know the truth before they do anything.

BTW: Linux is free on any or all of your computers at any time w/ virtually no restrictions. Now let's just get the game manufacturors to step up to the plate.
November 3, 2006 8:56:24 PM

winfs was meant to be a super dooper realtional database driven filing system. Its been kind of shelved from what I can tell until a 2007 update or win 2007 for servers or some such time.

I think it was a nice idea, perhaps overly complex, but offered many many benefits. It probably mirrored something already available in linux or mac or elsewhere.
November 4, 2006 12:56:02 AM

Ok so I came home from work and there are over 20 replies now... all are about licenses, enough of that! lol :roll:

What I think I will do is just use my current secondary to backup everything I need... Build my new system with the 2 new HDD's and then plug in my old secondary and transfer all my stuff and then take it out... call it good. Ok? Ok. 8)

When Vista comes I will be ok because I will have one HDD strictly for the OS and system things and I can either install over XP or do a format and install, wouldn't matter.
November 4, 2006 12:53:46 PM

why are you building it with 2 hds and then plugging in the 3rd later? why not just put all three in to begin with? also, if it works fine, why not leave the 3rd in? can't hurt.

btw, when i build a system, i usually unplug all but the main drive so that the system doesn't try to boot from the wrong hd. its usually easier that way.
November 4, 2006 8:13:01 PM

From what I can tell, WinFS has been canned completely.

It really would have been fantastic if they'd have made it happen, as the whole way we would access data would have been more database-like, but I think the speed was so crap that they decide to stick with NTFS.
November 4, 2006 9:09:19 PM

The reason I am not leaving the 3rd HD in is because it is EIDE... I am going to SATA drives. I won't need that much space.
!