Pure 802.11b NIC = WEP - only ?

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Hi,

Is my understanding correct that pure 802.11b cards are supposed to
support WEP and not WAP encryptions?

TIA, Eugene
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  1. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    > Is my understanding correct that pure 802.11b cards are supposed to
    > support WEP and not WAP encryptions?

    It's a firmware update to WPA (Presuming you meant WPA and not WAP).
  2. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On 24 Aug 2005 13:40:23 -0700, "Eugene F." <pm771.am@gmail.com> wrote:

    >Is my understanding correct that pure 802.11b cards are supposed to
    >support WEP and not WAP encryptions?

    Wrongo. I think you mean WPA. There's nothing inherent in 802.11b
    that will prevent implementing WPA.

    WPA encryption was designed to act as a temporary fix for the key
    exchange problems in WEP. It's primary design criteria is that it
    involved no hardware changes and minimal software changes. In theory,
    every card going back to the stone age of wireless that can do WEP
    should be able to also do WPA. The problem is that many vendors do
    not find it profitable to update firmware and drivers for cards they
    are no longer selling. Therefore, you should be able to get WPA on
    any currently sold devices, but will probably have trouble finding
    native WPA drivers for older cards.

    There's also the problem of memory space on older cards. WPA requires
    802.1x authentication which may not fit in the memory space available
    in older cards.

    In addition, note that there's no requirement that WPA be implemented
    in the card driver. There are various external programs that
    implement WPA including Wireless Zero Config for XP.

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=662bb74d-e7c1-48d6-95ee-1459234f4483&displaylang=en


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 http://802.11junk.com
    AE6KS 831-336-2558
  3. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Yes, I meant WPA.

    =============================================
    "David Taylor" <djtaylor@bigfoot.com> wrote in message
    news:MPG.1d779c2da6b5d24f989d9d@news.cable.ntlworld.com...
    > > Is my understanding correct that pure 802.11b cards are supposed to
    > > support WEP and not WAP encryptions?
    >
    > It's a firmware update to WPA (Presuming you meant WPA and not WAP).
  4. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff,

    After I had problems with my Linksys WMP11 card I replaced it with
    Edimax EW-7126. This card "Supports 64/128-bit AES/TKIP/WEP Data
    Encryption function ...".

    Please pardon my ignorance but does "TKIP" mean it supports WPA? If
    yes, is it the same "flavor" of WPA that is supported by my Linksys
    router (BEFW11S4 ver. 4 / original firmware)?

    TIA, Eugene
  5. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On 25 Aug 2005 14:31:27 -0700, "Eugene F." <pm771.am@gmail.com> wrote:

    >Please pardon my ignorance but does "TKIP" mean it supports WPA? If
    >yes, is it the same "flavor" of WPA that is supported by my Linksys
    >router (BEFW11S4 ver. 4 / original firmware)?

    TKIP:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TKIP

    TKIP is the key exchange mechanism used in WPA to replace the insecure
    method used in WEP.

    The 1.52.02 version of the BEFW11S4v4 firmware only supports TKIP key
    exchange. Although it's listed as an option, TKIP is the only choice.
    For a home system, I suggest you use WPA-PSK (pre-shared key) as
    anything else requires a RADIUS server for the 802.1x authentication.


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # http://802.11junk.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  6. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff,

    Thank you very much for the reply.

    <<< For a home system, I suggest you use WPA-PSK (pre-shared key) ... >>>

    What is the relationship between TKIP (that my hardware/drivers supposedly
    have) and WPA-PSK?

    I read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi_Protected_Access but still not
    sure.
  7. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Also I have Windows 98SE (not XP) on the desktop with Edimax card.
  8. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Thu, 25 Aug 2005 20:41:59 -0400, "E.F." <pm771@netscape.net> wrote:

    ><<< For a home system, I suggest you use WPA-PSK (pre-shared key) ... >>>
    >
    >What is the relationship between TKIP (that my hardware/drivers supposedly
    >have) and WPA-PSK?
    >
    >I read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wi-Fi_Protected_Access but still not
    >sure.

    Well, I don't know if I can simplify the various protocols but I'll
    try.

    802.11 is nothing more than encapsulated ethernet (802.3) packets.
    Under the 802.11 stuff is just plain old ethernet.

    Everything is wireless is bridging with no IP addresses or routing
    involved.

    WPA is a collection of protocols that defines how encryption takes
    place over 802.11 wireless.

    WPA requires 3 underlying protocols:
    1. A method of encryption which is usually RC4 cypher but can also be
    AES which is used in WPA2.
    2. A method of secure encryption key exchange which is TKIP.
    3. A method of authentication which is EAP and PEAP plus assorted
    mutations. Normally, these are based on 802.1x authentication which
    requires a RADIUS server somewhere.

    For home use, the RADIUS server for authentication is impractical so
    WPA-PSK (pre-shared key) was invented. The pre-shared key is used for
    both encryption and authentication.


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # http://802.11junk.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  9. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff,

    <<< Well, I don't know if I can simplify the various protocols but I'll try.
    >>>

    You did it beautifully. Thank you.

    Eugene
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