Linksys BEFW11S4 and WEP

Archived from groups: (More info?)

Has anyone had this problem?:

My wireless signal works great EXCEPT when I enable 128 Encryption keys.
Once I do this I can connect to the Router, but am not able to ping back to
it. Therefore cannot connect to the internet and browse.

Once I disable and then reconnect back to the router, I can ping back to the
router. Therefore I can connect and browse fine.

What gives...any suggestions?

Ron
14 answers Last reply
More about linksys befw11s4
  1. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    > My wireless signal works great EXCEPT when I enable 128 Encryption
    keys.
    > Once I do this I can connect to the Router, but am not able to ping
    back to
    > it. Therefore cannot connect to the internet and browse.
    >
    > Once I disable and then reconnect back to the router, I can ping
    back to the
    > router. Therefore I can connect and browse fine.
    >
    > What gives...any suggestions?
    >
    > Ron

    What type of wireless adapter are you using?
  2. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    > Has anyone had this problem?:
    >
    > My wireless signal works great EXCEPT when I enable 128 Encryption keys.
    > Once I do this I can connect to the Router, but am not able to ping back
    to
    > it. TherTh wifiefore cannot connect to the internet and browse.
    >
    > Once I disable and then reconnect back to the router, I can ping back to
    the
    > router. Therefore I can connect and browse fine.
    >
    > What gives...any suggestions?
    >
    > Ron

    The WIFI alliance that certifies interoperability of devices does not
    include testing of 128 bit wep encryption, only 64. So if you have a device
    brand A access point and device brand b wireless adapter there is no
    guarantee they will work together at 128.
  3. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Fri, 3 Dec 2004 15:41:54 -0500, "Ron" <ronisham@hotmail.com> wrote:

    >Has anyone had this problem?:

    Yes.

    >My wireless signal works great EXCEPT when I enable 128 Encryption keys.
    >Once I do this I can connect to the Router, but am not able to ping back to
    >it. Therefore cannot connect to the internet and browse.

    What version BEFW11S4? It's on the serial number tag.
    Extra points for supplying the firmware version.
    Points taken away if you have an obsolete revision firmware.

    >Once I disable and then reconnect back to the router, I can ping back to the
    >router. Therefore I can connect and browse fine.
    >What gives...any suggestions?

    Suggestion: Kindly disclose what client radio you're using.

    Assuming you did everything right (like type in the proper WEP key),
    the usual problem is the LENGTH of the WEP key. Some clients require
    that the ASCII WEP key be exactly 5 characters for 64 bit WEP and
    exactly 13 characters for 128 bit WEP. No more, no less. Apple
    requires that one preface the WEP with some cryptic symbol to identify
    the key as hexadecimal, in addition to making it exactly the right
    length. One vendor (name forgotten) simply truncated extra long WEP
    keys so that it was impossible to guess the correct corresponding WEP
    key. Anyway, try exactly 13 ASCII characters or exactly 26 Hex
    characters.

    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  4. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >the usual problem is the LENGTH of the WEP key. Some clients require
    >that the ASCII WEP key be exactly 5 characters for 64 bit WEP and
    >exactly 13 characters for 128 bit WEP. No more, no less.

    Actually, it turns out there are different "standards" for converting
    ASCII to Hex WEP keys, so if your AP and client radio drivers are
    different brands, you might want to use HEX in both places...
  5. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Fri, 03 Dec 2004 20:18:27 -0500, William P.N. Smith wrote:

    >Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >>the usual problem is the LENGTH of the WEP key. Some clients require
    >>that the ASCII WEP key be exactly 5 characters for 64 bit WEP and
    >>exactly 13 characters for 128 bit WEP. No more, no less.

    >Actually, it turns out there are different "standards" for converting
    >ASCII to Hex WEP keys, so if your AP and client radio drivers are
    >different brands, you might want to use HEX in both places...

    I beg to differ. When this came up in the past, I did a quick check
    of online and firmware based ASCII to Hex converters. I found one
    that screwed up by adding a null terminator to the Hex string.
    Another would truncate at 5 or 13 characters and automagically guess
    if it were 64 or 128 bits. All the others converted with a simple
    ASCII character to Hex character conversion. One ASCII character
    equals two Hex characters. There's only one way to do that. I mean
    what could be simpler?


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  6. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >William P.N. Smith wrote:

    >>Actually, it turns out there are different "standards" for converting
    >>ASCII to Hex WEP keys, so if your AP and client radio drivers are
    >>different brands, you might want to use HEX in both places...

    >I beg to differ. When this came up in the past, I did a quick check
    >of online and firmware based ASCII to Hex converters. I found one
    >that screwed up by adding a null terminator to the Hex string.

    Maybe D-Link?
    http://www.broadbandreports.com/forum/remark,9564873~mode=flat

    >what could be simpler?

    Nothing, but if they aren't exactly the same, they aren't going to
    match up. Making a random 128-bit key is easy enough that I've never
    bothered with passphrase generation, and I don't reccomend it due to
    some chance of incompatability.
  7. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    In article <jh52r0dif6j7bpnm6iufmqupkvu161292k@4ax.com>,
    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    :I beg to differ. When this came up in the past, I did a quick check
    :of online and firmware based ASCII to Hex converters. I found one
    :that screwed up by adding a null terminator to the Hex string.
    :Another would truncate at 5 or 13 characters and automagically guess
    :if it were 64 or 128 bits. All the others converted with a simple
    :ASCII character to Hex character conversion. One ASCII character
    :equals two Hex characters. There's only one way to do that. I mean
    :what could be simpler?

    http://www.tomsnetworking.com/FAQ-33-Linksys+Wireless-12.php

    Linksys WAP11 v.2.6 Version 1.07 firmware
    Version v1.07, April 16, 2003 release notes

    Fix WEP key passphrase generation. Certain passphrase genarates the
    wrong keys.


    I'm not sure if it's the same issue or not, but there was at least one
    device that took the user passphrase of non-fixed length and ran it
    through an algorithm (e.g., CRC or MD5 like functions) to generate the
    64 bit hex key, to save the user from having to enter stuff in hex.
    There was, though, a flaw in the initial version that caused it to
    only be able to generate a subset of the possible octets, with the
    result that the generated keyspace was *much* smaller than it should
    have been. [I suspect that it was indeed Linksys and that the above
    shows when it was fixed.]
    --
    Warhol's Second Law of Usenet: "In the future, everyone will troll
    for 15 minutes."
  8. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Fri, 03 Dec 2004 22:13:25 -0500, William P.N. Smith wrote:

    >Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >>William P.N. Smith wrote:
    >
    >>>Actually, it turns out there are different "standards" for converting
    >>>ASCII to Hex WEP keys, so if your AP and client radio drivers are
    >>>different brands, you might want to use HEX in both places...

    >>I beg to differ. When this came up in the past, I did a quick check
    >>of online and firmware based ASCII to Hex converters. I found one
    >>that screwed up by adding a null terminator to the Hex string.
    >
    >Maybe D-Link?
    >http://www.broadbandreports.com/forum/remark,9564873~mode=flat

    Groan. Another one. I wasn't aware of that bug.

    >>what could be simpler?

    >Nothing, but if they aren't exactly the same, they aren't going to
    >match up. Making a random 128-bit key is easy enough that I've never
    >bothered with passphrase generation, and I don't reccomend it due to
    >some chance of incompatability.

    I don't think too many vendors "randomize" the WEP key. However, I
    don't see these because all of my WEP keys are in currently in Hex,
    where no conversion is necessary. I started doing that after wasting
    a few hours doing battle with a Linksys WAP11 (unknown version) trying
    to get a compatible WEP key. I then repeated the time burner with a
    MR814v1 and a Toshiba laptop with some unknown Centrino 802.11b/g
    card. Hex always works. ASCII screws up. At the time, I wasn't in
    the mood for diagnosing the cause and assigning the blame, so I just
    started doing everything in Hex.

    Rhetorical question: How can any vendor screw up something so simple?


    --
    # Jeff Liebermann 150 Felker St #D Santa Cruz CA 95060
    # 831.336.2558 voice http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    # jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    # 831.421.6491 digital_pager jeffl@cruzio.com AE6KS
  9. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    <William> wrote:

    > Actually, it turns out there are different "standards" for converting
    > ASCII to Hex WEP keys, so if your AP and client radio drivers are
    > different brands, you might want to use HEX in both places...

    There are different ways to generate a WEP key from a *password*. It was
    a mistake to introduce the whole "password" business into wireless
    encryption. It only created greater complexity and confusion in the name
    of simplification.
  10. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:

    > Apple requires that one preface the WEP with some cryptic symbol to
    > identify the key as hexadecimal

    No longer. Apple formerly required a $ to preface hexadecimal keys, but
    all that is now handled by a pop-up menu. See
    <http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106424>.
  11. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Sat, 04 Dec 2004 07:49:56 GMT, neillmassello@earthlink.net (Neill
    Massello) wrote:

    >Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >
    >> Apple requires that one preface the WEP with some cryptic symbol to
    >> identify the key as hexadecimal

    >No longer. Apple formerly required a $ to preface hexadecimal keys, but
    >all that is now handled by a pop-up menu. See
    ><http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=106424>.

    One down, one to go. Do you know if Apple still insists that the
    ASCII keys be exactly 5 chars (64bit) and 13 chars (128bit) long?
    The examples in the above article are all exactly 5 and 13 chars long.
    Never mind, I found it:
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=163114
    http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=108058
    It has to be exactly 13 characters long.


    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  12. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    > I don't think too many vendors "randomize" the WEP key. However, I
    > don't see these because all of my WEP keys are in currently in Hex,

    I checked on an SMC, and a Netgear router, maybe Linksys, but I forget.
    I keyed in abcde for the string on a 64 bit key.
    None of the hex keys generated (four keys displayed on each router) looked
    like 61 62 63 64 65. Isn't that straight ASCII-Hex? What other conversion
    would you apply?

    --
    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
  13. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    On Sat, 4 Dec 2004 17:07:42 +0000 (UTC), dold@XReXXLinks.usenet.us.com
    wrote:

    >Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    >> I don't think too many vendors "randomize" the WEP key. However, I
    >> don't see these because all of my WEP keys are in currently in Hex,

    >I checked on an SMC, and a Netgear router, maybe Linksys, but I forget.
    >I keyed in abcde for the string on a 64 bit key.
    >None of the hex keys generated (four keys displayed on each router) looked
    >like 61 62 63 64 65. Isn't that straight ASCII-Hex? What other conversion
    >would you apply?

    Argh. I've been using hex for too long to notice what's happening
    with the ASCII to Hex conversion game. Orinoco uses straight ASCII
    characters to Hex conversion. Everyone else seems to be using some
    type of hash code generator. I'm not sure about the algorithms used
    but I do have some clues:

    ASCII to Hex generator Perl script:
    http://www.wigle.net/jigle/wep.pl

    Some notes on WEP key generators including ASCII key generator
    problems:
    http://www.systemexperts.com/tutors/WEPDetails.pdf

    I'll dig some more later.

    --
    Jeff Liebermann jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us
    150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
    Santa Cruz CA 95060 AE6KS 831-336-2558
  14. Archived from groups: (More info?)

    Jeff Liebermann <jeffl@comix.santa-cruz.ca.us> wrote:
    > type of hash code generator. I'm not sure about the algorithms used
    > but I do have some clues:

    > ASCII to Hex generator Perl script:
    > http://www.wigle.net/jigle/wep.pl

    Ahh,
    print "using common wifi driver algorithms.\n\n";

    Someone else indicated that it was a "password". Therefore the hex is an
    encryption of your password.
    I put in the hex to my SMC router and my Orinoco card, which under WinXP
    didn't seem to have a place for text anyway, saw that it gave me
    a 30% performance hit according to iperf, and turned it off.

    ---
    Clarence A Dold - Hidden Valley (Lake County) CA USA 38.8-122.5
Ask a new question

Read More

Configuration Routers Connection Linksys Wireless Networking