Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

E6600 core temp affecting CPU rate ??

Last response: in Overclocking
Share
November 7, 2006 4:31:35 PM

I just finished building new PC. With the following: Intel BoxD975XBXLKR 975X MOBO, Intel Core Duo E6600 CPU, case with two 9 CM fans and a Power Supply with two fans. By looking in the bios I'm RUNNUNG 82 C the cpu core voltage is about 1.2 volts and the CPU is running at 1.6 GHz most of the time. I'm using the stock heat sink that came with the CPU. The PC has never shut down or became unstable. The question I have is is the high temperature ( 82 C ) causing the CPU to run at 1.6 GHz when I see it at idle in the Bios or is it the CPU is idle and dosn't need to run at 2.4 GHz when I'm just observing the bios. Also, what would be the highest temp I should let this CPU run at?
Thanks for any replies :?: :?:
November 7, 2006 5:34:37 PM

that's very strange. what kind of power supply do you have? Your mobo, if on auto settings, may be compensating for the lack of power. I'm not sure though, but post the wattage and model of your power supply if possible.
a c 80 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 7, 2006 6:11:47 PM

I would check that your HSf is fitted securely, the legs have a tendency to pop out as you work your way around them by all accounts.

This is describing behaviour as if is it thermally throttling, this should occur at 85C according to TAT/coretemp, but this may or may not be 85 by Bios.

However it would also be describing speedstepping, or idle throttling, which is normal. 1600 is the normal freq for this, but given the higher tmpes I'd suggest it could be thermal, unlikley to be airlfow related, these are very cool chips, but very likely to be HSF fitting related, given the largish number of these that have been seen.

Check each of the legs for looseness, I think they'd be loose but I'm not sure.
Related resources
November 7, 2006 6:36:29 PM

If its idle, it'll manually step itself down to conserve power i.e. EIST or C1E

However, your temp seems high too, but one way of figuring it out is to touch your HSF and see how hot it is. Also, when you watch a movie or do anything cpu intensive, see what speed it is then...

If it is heat, re-seat the HSF, that will probably do the trick. If it's not hot, then your fine as is.
November 7, 2006 6:59:06 PM

Quote:
If it is heat, re-seat the HSF, that will probably do the trick. If it's not hot, then your fine as is.


Yup, and if that works out then try to set the FSB/Multi and the voltage up to stock specs and see if it will run.

82 C though...ouch. That seems impossible for a C2D. My stock 6600 has never exceeded an idle temp of 37 C.
November 7, 2006 7:42:42 PM

A temp of 82C in the BIOS seems impossible. The mobos read temps that differ from Intel's TAT/Core Temp etc., that can be a 10C+ difference. That says to me your TAT temp will be 90+, which is impossible. Not sure what the story is here, but it's gotta be the HSF which popped off. Once you've checked that, let us know. We can move on to the next diagnostic.
November 7, 2006 7:43:19 PM

The power supply is 580 watt atx12 ver 2.01. The fan assembly over the CPU feels snug. The only thing I noticed when I installed the fan is the the heatsink greace was in strips and thicker than I would have used. The install instructions didn't say anything about spreading it around to get an even thin coat. Thanks for your replys. I'm going to remove the fan and resurface the base with Artic Silver 5. Now that I know that the CPU should run at less than 50 C
November 7, 2006 7:49:34 PM

Using TAT, your CPU should run less than 60 (thats what is recommended). I've been running at 70 load and it seems fine.

AS5 is really great stuff. Should drop temps by 10C.

I'm sure you'l come right with that. Good luck.
November 7, 2006 7:50:25 PM

PS. Read the AS5 application instructions. The cores are very small, and you only need to apply it to a specific area of the CPU, not paint it everywhere. Worked for me. Cheers.
a c 80 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 7, 2006 7:52:53 PM

Specifically do the legs feel snug. I heard reports of people feeling that the mobo was bending before they snapped in properly. Not suggesting that you bend your mobo, but it might require a bit of pressure to get all four legs in properly.
November 7, 2006 8:03:31 PM

The stock HSF on the E6600 sucks. Get a Thermalright Ultra 120 for $50. I never looked back.
a c 80 à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
November 7, 2006 8:23:46 PM

Quote:
The stock HSF on the E6600 sucks. Get a Thermalright Ultra 120 for $50. I never looked back.


I'd prefer to go for one that is parallel to the mobo, I've got slow and quiet airflow through my system, not sure how much hotter the mobo would get with less airflow pushing onto its surface.

I actually think that stock is perfectly fine I'm achieving stable 33-34/idle and high 40's load with 2 120mm's on a slow speed, whole system is barely audible. But its just difficult to fit and hence causing so many problems.
November 8, 2006 1:12:36 AM

UP date! You were right I had a loose pin on one leg of the fan. I'm now running 51 C, 1.28 volts Vccp, and 2.8 GHz. The CPU frequency increased along with the Vccp so Intel must use the Vccp voltage to regulate the frequency. Thanks again for pointing me in the right direction.
!