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PC problems...don't know where to start...inside please.

Last response: in Motherboards
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November 7, 2006 6:14:33 PM

Here how it all begins..

Saturday nite I let my niece play some internet games and everything seem ok when I leave the house. When I came back, there is only black screen but power still on. I asked her but she said she didn't see anything, it just flash one and she tried power on again but screen still black. That's all I got from her.

Here my next step. When I turn my computer on, I hit every Fs button 1-12 but no luck, delete, break button everything. Since I have few harddrives with different OS and still not able to turn on. Then I noticed the keyboard has no power (or light on the keyboard not light up.) I used monitor, different keyboard known to work from other computer. The problem is that nothing show up on the screen... The power for the PC is on, every fans running, cd rom on, mouse on..

Hardwares are below

I don't know if those hardwares are any help.

If there is (are) any suggestions please let me know...

thanks

More about : problems start inside

November 7, 2006 7:25:58 PM

Please explain what "it just flash one" further. Describe that differently please.

To me, it's not clear what your problem is. I'm guessing it's a hardware problem from your monitor not showing an image and your keyboard's light not coming on. If I were you I would try to isolate the faulty piece of hardware. However it might not be a hardware problem.

Since your niece was watching when the problem happened you should interrogate her further as to what she was doing the moment the screen went dark, if she had installed any new programs or hardware drivers.

Does your computer let off any loud beeps when it starts up? That usually happens when the computer doesn't POST wich means a hardware problem for sure. Other than make sure you have the monitor properly hooked up, power on and plugged in. If you are using a video card take it out reseat it then try again.
November 7, 2006 8:06:41 PM

My niece said it just turn off suddenly while she playing and nothing happen after that. First I thought it was the monitor but I hooked up with known working monitor and keyboard but no help. When computer turn on, there is no beef at all, only the sounds of those fans and one of the cd rom. Now that I look at the pc again and I see the battery red light is on. You know the second light below the power button with the green light always on. For this second I have a hint about the quarter size battery on the motherboard..but will it cause this problem if this battery is bad? I have tried different video card but no work.

thanks.

I hope it's alittle clearer this time...sorry, my English is as bad as my broken language..
Related resources
November 7, 2006 8:11:46 PM

My first guess ... and frankly it's really only a guess ... is that your power supply unit (PSU) has burned out. Do you have another PSU which you know is working that you could try?

-john
November 7, 2006 8:35:58 PM

I said before, the power on is ok. alll fans are working led lights and light inside the power unit all bright.. fan inside the power unit is running...

For that matters, right now I have DIABLO 550W Black Chrome power supply. I have tried the working unit with 350w but that one is not have enough power input, because it turn on for few seconds then off..and never on again...

thanks
November 7, 2006 8:43:23 PM

Unfortunatly that motherboard (actually, a lot of motherboards of that era) was plagued with a leaking capacitor problem. Check your motherboard's capacitors for damage. If you need a reference just check google images. They will be buldging, split, or deformed to some degree and possibly have some electrolyte fluid leaked out onto the motherboard and "cooked" on.

Also, since this seems to be a video problem you have a few places to troubleshoot:

video card (try reseating, try a different one), RAM (try booting with only one stick), PSU (try a new one if you have one). I'm betting on the capacitors, though. It wasn't an uncommon problem 6 years ago.
November 7, 2006 8:56:29 PM

Thank you qwertycopter, I think I might found my problems...I saw about 10 capacitors bulged at the end..seen them but wasn't thinking about it much. I checked out the link you gave., just one question.. may be one or two or three, but at least 10 ? should I replace the capacitors or the get new motherboard?

thank you very much for that informations..

NG.
November 7, 2006 9:10:32 PM

Replacing the capacitors is difficult, not cost-effective, requires special tools, etc. You're much better off replacing the motherboard. However, I would suggest upgrading other parts as well like your CPU and RAM.
November 7, 2006 9:17:21 PM

I am not looking for any high end gamer or graphics work...juat everyday use and autocad, do you have any brand name in mind that is dependable? other words, easy to upgrade or working on it? I will search for recommanded motherboards from this forums.

I had all the soldiering tool only that too much many caps to replace...

thank y ou again
November 7, 2006 9:52:04 PM

Quote:
Replacing the capacitors is difficult, not cost-effective, requires special tools, etc. You're much better off replacing the motherboard. However, I would suggest upgrading other parts as well like your CPU and RAM.


If I wasnt at work I would provide some links to the conterary. You can in fact send in your mobo, and for $25+sh replace all the caps on the board. There are a few places that do this, and even some local shops.
November 7, 2006 10:41:07 PM

Quote:
Unfortunatly that motherboard (actually, a lot of motherboards of that era) was plagued with a leaking capacitor problem.

I was wondering why so many manufacturers seemed to be suddenly plugging the "all solid capacitors" on their high end mobos.

Maybe it's a solution in search of an (old) problem? :roll:

-john
November 7, 2006 10:51:07 PM

Quote:
If I wasnt at work I would provide some links to the conterary. You can in fact send in your mobo, and for $25+sh replace all the caps on the board. There are a few places that do this, and even some local shops.

FWIW, you can turn up links about this sort of thing just using google. (I don't know if the links lead to anything useful. Just saw that they are there).

-john
November 7, 2006 11:23:54 PM

I would want to give you links to places that look creditable. Cant do taht at work.

Good luck Op.
November 8, 2006 11:04:32 AM

Comptia_Rep, it's not easy for the average person. It may require a high-heat solder, which is more challenging to use and the higher temperature increases the risk of damage to other components. The average soldering tools are too large/clumsy for this job.

Another thing is that the electrolytic capacitor fluid is acidic and could have damaged other components on the motherboard. As you said, you'd want to replace all of the capacitors because the others on that board could be going bad.

Sure, he can take it to a shop but chances are quite high that the repair work is not cost-effective. He would be better off buying new, even low-end new, using this as an excuse to do so, and be happy with his modern equipment.
November 8, 2006 11:59:55 AM

I generally run into this problem at least once a week at my shop.

"Power turns on, lights light up, fans spin, but nothing but black screen, no beeps, nothing."

9 times out of 10, it is either the Processor burnt out, or the motherboard is malfunctioning. The other 1 out of the 10 times it will turn out to be a faulty power supply, but usually not.

--Shodar
November 8, 2006 12:48:27 PM

It takes 10 seconds to test the PSU in a computer shop, and 15 seconds to test for MOBO (error FF) and CPU (error 00).

to: qwertycopter
"You can in fact send in your mobo". I know it takes special skill and beter tools to resoder the Caps back on... that is why I suggested Sending it in to a place that does that specificly.
November 8, 2006 7:39:28 PM

Quote:
I generally run into this problem at least once a week at my shop.

"Power turns on, lights light up, fans spin, but nothing but black screen, no beeps, nothing."

9 times out of 10, it is either the Processor burnt out, or the motherboard is malfunctioning. The other 1 out of the 10 times it will turn out to be a faulty power supply, but usually not.

--Shodar


Shodar, please see my post here... Assuming you haven't already. :) 
My post
Having that exact problem, only I've replaced both my mobo and cpu to no avail.
November 9, 2006 2:42:21 AM

I have read over your post, AMDThunder... first, since I don't know the exact model of your motherboard and CPU, I have to ask... are you sure they are compatible?

If they are, then I would suggest resetting the BIOS using the CMOS CLEAR jumper.

Also, do you have another motherboard, or a friend's motherboard you could test your CPU out in? Even brand new computer hardware can arrive DOA... happens all the time, but I would find a way to test both the motherboard and the CPU (which can be bothersome without a PCI test card).

--Shodar
November 9, 2006 2:50:02 AM

One other thing I would suggest if you haven't done it already....

Assemble Motherboard, Processor, Video Card, and Ram OUTSIDE of your case on something like a piece of cardboard, hook up power and bump the power button pins with a screwdriver to make it power on and see if you can get it to at least post. This test is just to make sure your motherboard is not grounding out on the case somewhere.

--Shodar
November 9, 2006 3:00:54 AM

I've done everything you mentioned above, and then some. It's a Biostar mobo (754 pin), and a 3000+ Venice (754 pin) Not to mention it was a combo deal thru Newegg. I'd hope they were compatible!

I left some updates in my other thread. Boxed everything back up, and will be returning tomorrow. Thanks for taking a shot at it though.
November 9, 2006 6:36:19 AM

One last note... cause I think I found the combo you bought.

The power supply you used... was the main power connecter a 20 or 24 pin connector? And did you plug up the extra 4 prong connector located between the main power connector and the PS2 (keyboard/mouse) ports?

--Shodar
November 9, 2006 7:29:55 AM

I had leaky caps once. I almost wished the PC had just failed completely so I could have quickly noticed that there was a probelm. Instead in my case the PC had no noticeable problems and ran everything fine - I just didn't realize that my 500GB or so of HDD data was slowly getting corrupted.

At least a MB is replaceable...
November 9, 2006 12:50:48 PM

Quote:
One last note... cause I think I found the combo you bought.

The power supply you used... was the main power connecter a 20 or 24 pin connector? And did you plug up the extra 4 prong connector located between the main power connector and the PS2 (keyboard/mouse) ports?

--Shodar


20 pin connector w/the extra 4 pin. First attempt didn't have the 4 pin connected. Then I noticed it and plugged it in thinking I'd found the problem. The old board (A7V8X) didn't use the 4 pin. I suppose it's possible the 4 pin connector is bad. The psu I used to test with doesn't even have a 4 pin, so I guess it really doesn't help much. Sheesh, I've got everything boxed up and ready to ship back today. Tempted to see if my wife's old emachine has the 4 pin to test it. Probably not though.
November 9, 2006 12:51:47 PM

Quote:
to: qwertycopter
"You can in fact send in your mobo". I know it takes special skill and beter tools to resoder the Caps back on... that is why I suggested Sending it in to a place that does that specificly.

Well I guess you're talking about "in general" to add to the OP's general knowledge, but I'm talking about his specific problem. It's not cost effective to pay to revive a Socket A motherboard, especially one that has capacitor fluid leaked on it. So there's no "contrary" about it.
November 9, 2006 1:35:56 PM

35$ is hardly lots of cash. Most shops wont charge if they dont fix the board (local ones anyway). And $35 is cheaper then upgrading.
November 9, 2006 11:23:28 PM

That was a bloody good call on that motherboard, kudos on your memory skills.
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