Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

What will be the next "NT" ?

Last response: in Windows 8
Share
December 9, 2012 8:05:23 AM

Hi all.

Windows 8 uses the same basic kernel (NT 6.2) as Vista (NT 6.0) .
Ok.
But what is the next big architeture release - NT7 or better?

Windows 9/ Blue seems like just a new interface with service pack fixes.
I didn't hear anything about the next BIG release, not even rumors.
Will we have NT 6 forever ?

Any ideas?
Thanks!

More about : question

a b * Windows 8
December 9, 2012 8:49:21 AM

There has never been a big architecture release beside win8 RT. It's all still x86 ;) 
m
0
l
December 9, 2012 10:22:29 AM

Windows 2003 on IA-64 (Itanium).

IA-64 was misunderstood by the people here due to it's lower clock speeds.

WinNT was also on Alpha, MIPS, etc too.
m
0
l
Related resources
December 9, 2012 10:24:59 AM

Windows 2003 on IA-64 (Itanium).

IA-64 was misunderstood by the people here due to it's lower clock speeds.

WinNT was also on Alpha, MIPS, etc too.
m
0
l
a b * Windows 8
December 9, 2012 10:53:56 AM

Scott_D_Bowen said:
Windows 2003 on IA-64 (Itanium).

IA-64 was misunderstood by the people here due to it's lower clock speeds.

WinNT was also on Alpha, MIPS, etc too.

Hopefully the ARM version is not going the same way! ;) 
m
0
l
a b * Windows 8
December 9, 2012 10:54:59 AM

Scott_D_Bowen said:
Windows 2003 on IA-64 (Itanium).

IA-64 was misunderstood by the people here due to it's lower clock speeds.

WinNT was also on Alpha, MIPS, etc too.

Hopefully the ARM version is not going the same way ;) 
m
0
l
December 19, 2012 8:00:26 AM

Thanks for the posts.
But I think the kernel has little to do with the CPU architecture.

NT was processor independent since the very begining.
For example, NT3 supported x86, DEC Alpha, and ARC-compliant MIPS platforms.
NT 6 supported x86/64 and Itanium. Then later dropped Itanium and added ARM.
So there is no CPU architecure pattern here.

Anyway,
I'm hoping the new NT 7 kernel will better support heterogeneous computing architectures. So for doing graphics or OpenCL, no memory needs to be copied, loaded, and unloaded to and from the video card. Instead they will all use the exact-same 64 bit addressing so there is no loading and unloading. This can also be used for hard-drives. That means no more offline - except in network environments.

NT 7 can also mean support for 128 bit CPUs

(my 2 cents worth)
m
0
l
!