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Scanner Help, please

Last response: in Computer Peripherals
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April 30, 2005 6:23:35 AM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

I've done a good bit of research on my own, but I'm lost in the search for a
decent scanner for my [pretty simple] needs. Basically, I'm trying to find
out if I need to spend $300+ for a scanner good enough to reproduce
photographs for not-so-discriminating family, friends, and acquaintances. I
do not need to scan negatives or slides, and speed is not an issue at all.
I will be using the scanner to import photographs into Photoshop for basic
restoration, clean-up, enlargement, etc. If I print the scanned and edited
photos, most will be 4x6 and 5x7, with a few at 8x10. I really just want
good color reproduction and decent detail in the darker areas. As all of
you know, consumer/pro-sumer scanners range from $50 to $500. Of course,
I'd like to get the best value for my specific purposes. The Epson
Perfection line of scanners look like a reasonable choice, but, again, the
price range is huge, and I'm not sure what I'm getting at the upper end of
the range. If it's super-duper speed, resolutions that create 125mb files,
or the ability to scan negs and numerous slides, then it's likely overkill
for my needs. Is it like inkjet printers, where the difference in price is
often speed and features, while the print engine is basically the same
(within the same manufacturer, of course)?

Input greatly appreciated.


jake

More about : scanner

Anonymous
April 30, 2005 4:23:32 PM

Archived from groups: alt.comp.periphs.scanner (More info?)

"Jake" <jake@yahoo.com> wrote in message
news:H_Bce.45$9n1.22@tornado.ohiordc.rr.com...
> I've done a good bit of research on my own, but I'm lost in the search for
a
> decent scanner for my [pretty simple] needs. Basically, I'm trying to
find
> out if I need to spend $300+ for a scanner good enough to reproduce
> photographs for not-so-discriminating family, friends, and acquaintances.
I
> do not need to scan negatives or slides, and speed is not an issue at all.
> I will be using the scanner to import photographs into Photoshop for basic
> restoration, clean-up, enlargement, etc. If I print the scanned and
edited
> photos, most will be 4x6 and 5x7, with a few at 8x10. I really just want
> good color reproduction and decent detail in the darker areas. As all of
> you know, consumer/pro-sumer scanners range from $50 to $500. Of course,
> I'd like to get the best value for my specific purposes. The Epson
> Perfection line of scanners look like a reasonable choice, but, again, the
> price range is huge, and I'm not sure what I'm getting at the upper end of
> the range. If it's super-duper speed, resolutions that create 125mb
files,
> or the ability to scan negs and numerous slides, then it's likely overkill
> for my needs. Is it like inkjet printers, where the difference in price
is
> often speed and features, while the print engine is basically the same
> (within the same manufacturer, of course)?
>
> Input greatly appreciated.
>
>
> jake
>
Since you stated that you do not need to scan film, Negatives or Slides, you
only need a good fast flatbed scanner.

For the ability to scan photographs up to 8x10 inches, all you need is a A4
or Letter size scanner. (They are the most common).

A little basic math:
It has been found that for practical purposes, a 300 dpi print is about all
the eye can resolve
To print 8x10 for the best quality, you need about 300 dpi for the print.
8 inches * 300 dpi= 2400 Pixels
10 inches * 300 dpi= 3000 Pixels

So you need a scanner that can produce a 2400 x 3000 Pixel image from the
smallest photo you want to scan.

Most likely the smallest photo will be 2x3 inches (wallet size).
so 2400 pixels divided by 2 = 1200 dpi, to get enough pixels to print our
8x10 the scanner must be at least a 1200 dpi optical resolution scanner.

Now, today 1200 dpi and up scanners start at around $50-99 Any of which will
do your job.

There are two types of scanner sensors, CIS (Contact Image Sensor) and CCD
(Charged Coupled Device). A CIS has little or no depth of field. Which means
that any object that is not in direct contact with the glass will not be in
focus.
A CCD has a fair amount of depth of field. You can scan even 3D objects that
you place on the glass.

I would recommend a Canon or an Epson scanner. Both are best manufactures.
Epson:
http://www.epson.com/cgi-bin/Store/index.jsp

Epson Perfection 2480 PHOTO is the lowest cost scanner at about $99. It is a
2400 dpi scanner.

Canon:
http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=Consume...

The first model that has a CCD sensor in the Canon line is the CanoScan
3000ex. It is 1200 dpi and about $50.

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