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It's me again! Have I got a network card in my computer!! ?

Last response: in Networking
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February 19, 2006 8:19:51 PM

Yes that was a question..I do not understand all this network business - but I want to. Here's my ranting!

I have 2 computers - lets call them A and B.

Computer A connects to the Internet via Broadband cable setup - no problem. My printer is connected to this computer and it works.

Computer B just does general work and is not connected to the internet at all and has no printer attached to it.

I would like:
(a) for both computers to connect to the internet via some sort of simple networking and to be able to access each others files and folders.

(b) to be able to use the printer from whichever computer I am using via the same networking setup.

(c) I read somewhere something to the effect that the correct installation for me should definitely be with computer A connecting directly to the Internet, but the other one only connecting via some sort of is it called "hub" or "router". The explanation ran that it was a more safe way to set things up. As opposed to linking the modem to the WAN and then both computers into the available ports. (You will understand even if I don't!) It seems to me that computer B would then be behind the first one I suppose and not so easily made available to intrusion.

What I find confusing to start with - is I do not have a traditional network card plugged into a PCI slot in the first place in either computer, so I thought perhaps I was on a loser straight away!

However I have noticed something in the Device Manager under a heading called NETWORK ADAPTERS and it reads as follows for each of the computers:

Computer A: Intel (R) Pro/1000 PM Network Connection
Computer B: Intel (R) Pro/1000 CT Network Connection

Are they equivalent actual PCI installed network cards please?

Each of the computers have just ONE RJ45 network connection available.
For computer A that connects to the internet I purchased a SPLITTER making the one connection into two. Please see my image (No. 1) of this at: http://www.freewebs.com/ukdave/images.htm

I have no idea why I purchased this! I just thought at some stage I might need more than one RJ45 connection I suppose!

Could someone kindly set me out on the path of what I need to purchase to set all this up please and also some simple basic route to what I can expect to have to do.

Being completely honest with you all - I DID try to do some connecting with a US Robotics router I have today, and all I resulted with was a MESS.

Everytime I tried plugging in an RJ45 connecting cable into the bottom slot of the image I have put up for you to look at, it automatically resulted in Windows advising me I had in fact UNPLUGGED the network. I had plugged it in and routed it back to one of the slots on the router. Gave up.....

After 5 hours I realised my logic was hopeless and I put this together hoping as usual you will come to my aid. Just a note - the cabling is not that thing called is it "cross-over" cable, but just plain straight connections in the wiring.

Many thanks.
David :?

More about : network card computer

February 20, 2006 12:44:55 PM

Hi,

Sharing both PCs to be able to use the Internet isn't too tricky if you follow this guide: click me !

The network cards you see in Device Manager are inbuilt ones. All motherboards now have inbuilt network cards so usually there is no need to buy additional PCI cards.

The network you need to set up would look something like this:

INTERNET
|
|
BROADBAND MODEM/ROUTER
|
|
PC1 + PC2

Basically the Broadband router (with inbuilt modem) gets an I.P address from your service provider. The router is configured (by default) to assign an I.P address to both of your PCs (called DHCP). Whenever the PCs want to communicate with the Internet they go through your router and out ...

To allow both PCs to print simply share out the printer on PC1 and point PC2 to the shared printer. Check this guide out ...
click me !
February 20, 2006 5:43:22 PM

Quote:
Hi,

Sharing both PCs to be able to use the Internet isn't too tricky if you follow this guide: click me !

The network cards you see in Device Manager are inbuilt ones. All motherboards now have inbuilt network cards so usually there is no need to buy additional PCI cards.

The network you need to set up would look something like this:

INTERNET
|
|
BROADBAND MODEM/ROUTER
|
|
PC1 + PC2

Basically the Broadband router (with inbuilt modem) gets an I.P address from your service provider. The router is configured (by default) to assign an I.P address to both of your PCs (called DHCP). Whenever the PCs want to communicate with the Internet they go through your router and out ...

To allow both PCs to print simply share out the printer on PC1 and point PC2 to the shared printer. Check this guide out ...
click me !

Thank you so much for the links. Visited both links and printed off information. Followed the instructions and hey presto - all worked.

I then discovered a bit more information on networking the folders and files between the two computers. Basically by right clicking the root of each drive and SHARING (having read the warnings provided")!

Eventually after a LOT of effort, based on things not working out time and time again - I succeeded in doing what I set out to do with regard to the files and folders.

What I did discover even as a rookie, and that might be of help to others is this. Having got computer B to show all the folders in the local network in MY NETWORK PLACES it still did not show anything on computer A in the same way.

Then I turned off my Kerio Personal Firewall in computer B and immediately the shared folders appeared in the Local Network on computer A as described in the paragraph above. Equally although the folders appeared on my computer B straight away when I setup a simple HOME network I still could not access the folders on computer A. Once again it was the Windows XP Professional (SP2) Firewall that was ON. Now when I turned that off - immediately I could access the information in those folders.

However the PROGRAM FILES folder could not be accessed because apparently that was being controlled and required by the Operating System. Thinking about it for a moment, I suppose that makes very good sense. You would not want any tinkering about with those files and possibly upsetting the organized working of the computer closely connected to that folder.

Nevertheless what I did will quite rightly be debated because of my turning off the firewalls to achieve my ends. It is not what I believe Microsoft would recommend, and I suppose after internal work at home has been carried out, one should then turn both firewalls back on again.

Anyway that's it folks. All done and I hope a few extra comments I made will help along the way. To you "hubbartd" I am very grateful for your clear instructions that got me well on the way. "Thanks".
David :) 
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February 20, 2006 11:27:30 PM

There is a setting in MS firewall, that will allow local ports (subnets) to comunicate and still have the firewall turned on. I believe it is located under the advanced port settings. I do not have the pro version, so I can't be sure.

As for your router, make sure the firewall is on, and respond to ping off. for added security.
February 21, 2006 7:49:22 AM

Glad you got things working !

:p 
February 21, 2006 8:54:36 AM

Quote:
There is a setting in MS firewall, that will allow local ports (subnets) to comunicate and still have the firewall turned on. I believe it is located under the advanced port settings. I do not have the pro version, so I can't be sure.

As for your router, make sure the firewall is on, and respond to ping off. for added security.

Yes - "thanks!" found that setting in MS firewall. It was under Advanced/Local Area Connection - I unchecked the box leaving it DISABLED. Then as you suggested I could reach the files on Computer A from Computer B no problem.

However going the other way I still have to turn the Firewall off in its entirety to access Computer B's files from Computer A. That is not the fault of the program I feel sure but down to the fact I am not into knowing all the various places to look to achieve what was a simple process with Microsoft's own Firewall.

However, this brings me to your point concerning the router and making sure the firewall is on. Well I (for the first time!) looked into all the settings for the router, and believe it or not I could not see one mention of a firewall. I bet it is there though somewhere!! I hope so because I am thinking of removing the firewall on computer B and relying on the router for protection in this case.

Your item "and respond to ping off." - what does all this mean please? The only reference in I must say a very comprehensive set of menus to ping was:"Discard Ping from WAN side" and that is DISABLED. No idea what it is referring to however!

But any references other than that to PING I just could see nowhere. Or the business of FIREWALL. I had just imagined that a router always had a sort of firewall built in anyway as a matter of course. Perhaps I was misguided on that one.

My router is a US ROBOTICS BROADBAND ROUTER V.2.5 which I have had for a while now.

Thanks for your interest in my posting and at least I learned about how to deal with that setting in MS Firewall. Also maybe there is a firewall around that I could install on computer B which is simple in that a setting for allowing Local Area Connection to be disabled from firewall was a little more obvious to the uninitiated.

Thanks again.
David
February 21, 2006 1:39:06 PM

Hi,

A few pointers to clear things up :p 
You can basically have two types of firewall - a hardware firewall and a software firewall.

Your router is a hardware firewall and the the XP/Kerio firewalls are software .... easy so far :wink:

The way your router protects you is that the router gets a valid I.P address from your Internet service provider and that is what is visible to other Internet users. People from outside can only see your router, not the PCs behind it. The clever part is that your router does something called NAT (Network Address Translation) by passing on any requests from your PCs out to the Internet but it only allows certain traffic back (i.e. shielding you from nasty attacks).

By default your router will block most incoming ports so nobody can get to your PCs from the Internet as they won't be able to contact them directly and won't even know they exist.

You do not need an additional software firewall on each PC as your router is already doing that job. I have disabled my XP firewall but you can leave it on if it doesn't interfere with anything.

Your PCs should have an I.P address beginning with 192.168
this means that the PCs are correctly configured and sitting behind your hardware firewall.

To check simply go to a PC and open a DOS box (Start -- Run -- CMD)
Type: IPCONFIG


Hope this makes sense 8)
February 21, 2006 2:35:03 PM

Quote:
Hi,

A few pointers to clear things up :p 
......

Your PCs should have an I.P address beginning with 192.168
this means that the PCs are correctly configured and sitting behind your hardware firewall.

To check simply go to a PC and open a DOS box (Start -- Run -- CMD)
Type: IPCONFIG


Hope this makes sense 8)

Makes very good sense. Checked it out and "yes" both machines have an I.P. address beginning with 192.168.

When you referred to the router getting a valid IP address from my Internet service provider, would that address bear no similarity to the ones I have traced as belonging to my own 2 machines?

Accept your point about software firewalls. Personally I think I will forget both, Windows and the Kerio ones I have operating at present. Thanks for the advice and clarification.

David :) 
February 21, 2006 2:47:03 PM

Hi again :p 

To connect to the Internet you need a valid I.P address.
I.P addresses are divided into three basic types Class A, Class B and Class C (click me for description)

You cannot simply pick an I.P address as two or more people could pick the same address so there is an official body who hands out I.P addresses (InterNIC).

What your router does is get an official I.P address from your service provider (who has registered a load of them) and then use NAT trickery to pass Internet traffic to and from your PCs.

The 192.168 addresses are called private I.P addresses and basically you are free to use what you want because they are never connected to the Internet (your router does all the communicating with the outside, not the PC directly).

A lot of companies use this NAT method so that Internet traffic from work PCs is routed through a single gateway so that all traffic appears to be originating from the same I.P address. Your home network works in the same way.

:p 
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