Quad core or Duo?

I am wanting to build a new computer here shortly, and would not like to update the processor in it EVER. It would probaly see about 4years of use until I build another machine from scratch.

What I was wondering, is it worth waiting for the quad cores to go down, and do you think they will be very effective? I want a gaming system that will be able to play most DX10 games, and I was thinking of either a 6700 or 6600extreme for the core2duos. Would these systems be the best bet to buy in Early January, or will the Quad cores be the new craze for gaming and leave me with a machine that is meh at best in 1year.

Supporting mods would be DX10 compatible card, 2gb of ram(800mhz and probaly 4-4-4-12), rapto 74gb 10krpm HD, 350gb HD, and supporting motherboard. I will also be buying Vista when it comes out.
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  1. A quad core will not improve gameplay that much. In fact, multi-threaded games barely just came out and the performance boost they get for dual core isn't that big. Quad core for games is just a waste of money. The money is better spent on a premium video card.
  2. If you want a rig that will be able to play MOST dx10 games, the only way to successfully do that is when those games come out. You really need to let the technology mature. It's rather hard to predict how good some thing you buy now will be at running something that comes in a year (even more so for 4 years.)
  3. Well, I am wanting to build a computer here shortly. The laptop I have been using just isn't cutting it, and I would like to get into some gaming action here shortly. As for the system, I would like to get the processor, ram, hard-drive, and then maybe upgrade the graphics card a few months down the road. I was thinking about buyng the x800gto 256mb card then selling it to my friend when he builds his computer next summer for pretty cheap, $40 or so. So do you think the Core2Duo processors will be working well in the next 2years or so? I was thinking that the 6600 would be the best bet if they would not be, and then "maybe" upgrading if need be.
  4. If you have money to burn and/or do scientific or computation intensive work like rendering and simulation, then get quad-core and perhaps overclock it to 3.3GHz+.

    If you just play games and encode videos now and then, dual-core is more than sufficient for the next four years. And Core 2 Duo is the best mainstream dual-core at the moment.

    As for your main hard drive, see if you can't get the 150GB version. It's a newer part (denser platters) and thus has a higher sustained transfer rate, even if the seek time is nearly the same as other 10k RPM drives.
  5. I'm going to be doing the same thing as you, building a system that I expect to last a bare minimum of 3 years without as much as opening the case. My focus is not gaming, as I do no gaming at all (SimCity excluded) but I do use Pr0noshop a lot so I need all the multithreading and RAM I can buy. I launched a similar thread a few weeks ago, and the bottom line of my decision is in my sig. I'm going to hold out until about June as by then the Kentsfield pricing will be down, Vista should be getting close to an SP1, and there will be a reasonable choice of proven mobos for the quadcores.

    Also important is the shakedown in the D3D10 videocards. I learned long ago in a galaxy far far away to never buy anything for my state-of-the-art Mac Plus, SE or II when it first launched. As much as it might hurt to give up bragging rights for a few months to all the teenage wankers with oodles of cash from their latest dope deal burning a hole in their pockets, there is always a stabilization of both hardware and software in the first few months, up to a year. You can jump and be first on the bandwagon, but be ready to shell out some more to get things right just a bit down the road.

    Now if the point of building the system is to gut it every three months to plug in the latest expensive gimcrack, then go ahead, stand in line and be the first on your block to own the newest thingimabob. But for a long-term system as both you and I are considering, I believe that the best choice on quads would be to hold your horses!

    But then again, advocating patience in the PC field is like preaching abstention on March break...

    :lol:
  6. Bill Gates or the rest of us?
  7. The sad truth is, the more performance the mainstream gets, the more performance the developers can waste.

    Get a e6600 and update your Video Card on a yearly basis.
  8. Quote:
    Get a e6600 and update your Video Card on a yearly basis.


    Given that the first D3D10 cards are well over $500 that could be a pretty pricy proposition! How much freakin' money are people supposed to spend just to chase ugly things around a screen and shooting them???

    :?
  9. Quote:
    Get a e6600 and update your Video Card on a yearly basis.


    Given that the first D3D10 cards are well over $500 that could be a pretty pricy proposition! How much freakin' money are people supposed to spend just to chase ugly things around a screen and shooting them???

    :?Given your sig it appears that gaming acumen is not high on your list of needs. Mine is not either. For someone who wants a gaming system that will hold up for awhile, an E6600 and 8800GTS would be a good choice. Both should not need upgrades for at least 2 years. A quad core will cost serious $$$ today with little or no immediate benefit. 2 years from now quads will cost much less, and still may not be necessary. 4 years is a long time for a gaming enthusiast to go without upgrades. You pay to play!
  10. I found that if you put a lot of time into it, selling your hardware while it's still ' hot' and buying the new stuff can come close to buying an entirely new PC every 3 years.

    Also using the step-up program with graphic card can be pretty usefull, ~100/200$ to upgrade the video card is pretty good!

    Im not positive about the 6600 recommendation because the new 8800GTX is already bottlenecked in a fw benchies/games, that wont get any better unless we do see a much better use of threaded game and some offloading on video card and such...
  11. Quote:
    Given your sig it appears that gaming acumen is not high on your list of needs. Mine is not either.


    Yeah, I had stated in my earlier post:

    "My focus is not gaming, as I do no gaming at all (SimCity excluded) but I do use Pr0noshop a lot so I need all the multithreading and RAM I can buy."

    I completely agree that if your main aim is gaming, the whole concept of keeping a system unimproved for 3-4 years is rather fallacious. The technology is developing so fast that we may be on DX12 or maybe DX13 by then! BTW, I must be too damn old as I can't for the life of me understand why anyone would want to spend more than a minute of their lives playing most of that violent, degrading, disgusting filth masquerading as games. But maybe because of my advanced age I just can't relate to the sheer joy of bloodsplattering and decapitations.

    Quote:
    I found that if you put a lot of time into it, selling your hardware while it's still ' hot' and buying the new stuff can come close to buying an entirely new PC every 3 years.


    Of course. But then you're faced with transferring all your software over, reloading, rejiggling, facing the unknown number of problems and bugs that almost always seem to pop up, etc. If I had to buy a new car, change the engine 4 months later, sell the whole thing and buy a new one 4 months after that, and so on, I'd be royally pi$$ed off. I don't know why we assume that it should be standard procedure with PCs. I drive a car that was new at the same time as my Pentium P54C. Now, my car still starts, drives, gets me where I want to go and back the same as it did all those years ago. The Pentium was relegated to the scrap heap a decade ago as being completely outdated. With the price of enthusiast PCs quickly reaching the level of basic new cars, how much money do the manufacturers think that users are going to pay them to upgrade everything every few months?

    If you're independently wealthy or living off of daddy's trust account it's one story. But unfortunately, I work for a living.
  12. If you updated yearly you don´t have to buy the fastest. Buy midrange and sell the old one. It´s quite cheap that way. :wink:
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