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New installation problems

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Anonymous
December 21, 2004 7:43:01 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

I just recently reinstalled Windows XP Professional on top of the Home
Edition. I chose not to format my hard drive. When I finished installing, I
found out that all of my programs' shortcuts had disappeared from the Start
Menu and the Add/Remove Programs was completely empty. My programs are all
still in the same place, except the computer doesnt seem to recognise them.
Can anyone help?

More about : installation problems

Anonymous
December 21, 2004 1:32:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 04:43:01 -0800, Someone who needs help wrote:

> I just recently reinstalled Windows XP Professional on top of the Home
> Edition. I chose not to format my hard drive. When I finished installing, I
> found out that all of my programs' shortcuts had disappeared from the Start
> Menu and the Add/Remove Programs was completely empty. My programs are all
> still in the same place, except the computer doesnt seem to recognise them.
> Can anyone help?

The method that you used for reinstalling Windows, replaced what was there
instead of repairing it. You need to rebuild your personal extras
(shortcuts, preferences, etc) and reinstall your programs. In most cases
they can be reinstalled to the existing folders.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 10:34:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:
> On Tue, 21 Dec 2004 04:43:01 -0800, Someone who needs help wrote:
>
>
>>I just recently reinstalled Windows XP Professional on top of the Home
>>Edition. I chose not to format my hard drive. When I finished installing, I
>>found out that all of my programs' shortcuts had disappeared from the Start
>>Menu and the Add/Remove Programs was completely empty. My programs are all
>>still in the same place, except the computer doesnt seem to recognise them.
>>Can anyone help?
>
>
> The method that you used for reinstalling Windows, replaced what was there
> instead of repairing it. You need to rebuild your personal extras
> (shortcuts, preferences, etc) and reinstall your programs. In most cases
> they can be reinstalled to the existing folders.
>

Similar problem here:

Installed XP thinking it would delete all that old stuff. Re-installed
programs show on the start menu and add/del new software. Old programs
still show on Explorer, along with new, although I cannot access the old.

What (and how)can I safely delete all entries that do not fit current
configuration?

I am still running as administrator only. In Doc & Settings, can I
delete all users and default user folders? And which is my current
administrator folder (there are two).
Related resources
Anonymous
January 10, 2005 10:34:17 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 19:34:16 GMT, mike gray wrote:
> Similar problem here:
>
> Installed XP thinking it would delete all that old stuff. Re-installed
> programs show on the start menu and add/del new software. Old programs
> still show on Explorer, along with new, although I cannot access the old.
>
> What (and how)can I safely delete all entries that do not fit current
> configuration?
>
> I am still running as administrator only. In Doc & Settings, can I
> delete all users and default user folders? And which is my current
> administrator folder (there are two).

What do you mean by "cannot access the old" - old what? Software? Folders?
Files? Start Menu items? And along with those answers, we need to know what
happens when you try.

I'm not clear on what entries you're referring to - "entries that do not
fit the current configuration" - so can't answer that without more info on
what exactly those entries are.

Do not delete the All Users and Default User folders. They provide
functions that you may need at some point in time. All Users collects info
(mostly start menu shortcuts) that applies to all users even if there is
only one user. Default User is a template account used to create new user
accounts.

To find out what your current user folder is: Log on with the account in
question. Then click Start> Run. Type
%userprofile%
into the text box and click OK. Windows Explorer will pop up a folder
window -- the folder specifically for this account currently logged on. If
you have the Address bar displayed (View> Toolbars> Address), the path to
that folder will be apparent.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 8:15:04 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:

> On Mon, 10 Jan 2005 19:34:16 GMT, mike gray wrote:
>
>>Similar problem here:
>>
>>Installed XP thinking it would delete all that old stuff. Re-installed
>>programs show on the start menu and add/del new software. Old programs
>>still show on Explorer, along with new, although I cannot access the old.
>>
>>What (and how)can I safely delete all entries that do not fit current
>>configuration?
>>
>>I am still running as administrator only. In Doc & Settings, can I
>>delete all users and default user folders? And which is my current
>>administrator folder (there are two).
>
>
> What do you mean by "cannot access the old" - old what? Software? Folders?
> Files? Start Menu items? And along with those answers, we need to know what
> happens when you try.

The start menu shows only software loaded after reinstalling XP.
Explorer shows all previous software as well as newly loaded software.

Previous software does not respond to left or right clicking, or to any
"open" or other commands. It does delete. If not deleted, reloading the
software sees the previous installation, usually with some "software
already exists" message.

> I'm not clear on what entries you're referring to - "entries that do not
> fit the current configuration" - so can't answer that without more info on
> what exactly those entries are.
>
> Do not delete the All Users and Default User folders. They provide
> functions that you may need at some point in time. All Users collects info
> (mostly start menu shortcuts) that applies to all users even if there is
> only one user. Default User is a template account used to create new user
> accounts.

There are multiple administrator, all users, and default users folders.
Some are left over from the previous installation, some are newly
created. I just have to figure out which are which.
>
> To find out what your current user folder is: Log on with the account in
> question. Then click Start> Run. Type
> %userprofile%
> into the text box and click OK. Windows Explorer will pop up a folder
> window -- the folder specifically for this account currently logged on. If
> you have the Address bar displayed (View> Toolbars> Address), the path to
> that folder will be apparent.

Did that. I assume it is ok to delete the other (old) administrator in
explorer?

m
Anonymous
January 11, 2005 8:15:05 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Tue, 11 Jan 2005 17:15:04 GMT, mike gray wrote:

> The start menu shows only software loaded after reinstalling XP.
> Explorer shows all previous software as well as newly loaded software.
>
> Previous software does not respond to left or right clicking, or to any
> "open" or other commands. It does delete. If not deleted, reloading the
> software sees the previous installation, usually with some "software
> already exists" message.

It sounds like you reinstalled XP in a such a way that it replaced only the
Windows folder (and the Windows registry) and leaving all other files on
the hard drive in place. In this case, the Windows registry is rebuilt as
well and it has no knowledge of your previously install applications.

It's also possible that you performed a "parallel" install - two Windows
folders on one hard drive. Check carefully to be sure this hasn't happened.

A repair install on the other hand, incorporates existing user profile,
registry info, etc. while fixing the Windows setup. It also avoids those
extra accounts with the .<letters here> appended to their names. For future
reference:

How to Perform an In-Place Upgrade (Reinstallation) of Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;EN-US;315341

NOTE: The above article applies to retail CD or a generic OEM CD. If your
Windows came preinstalled and your recovery media has been customized by
the manufacturer, check your system manual for restore/repair options and
for directions.

You will want to visit Windows Update site to reapply updates needed by the
operating system.

You will also need to reinstall any program that will not run as a stand
alone application (cannot double click the main *.EXE file to successfully
launch the program).

If you run into a program that will not let you reinstall because it
detects the files for the old install of the program, you should visit the
tech support pages for that program online for "manual uninstall"
directions. Then reinstall the program.

Another useful thing to know as you're cleaning up the current setup, you
will be denied access to folders and files belonging to the "old you."
Windows is still protecting those files for that account. You can regain
access to them by taking ownership:
HOW TO: Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=308421

> There are multiple administrator, all users, and default users folders.
> Some are left over from the previous installation, some are newly
> created. I just have to figure out which are which.

One way to figure this out would be using Windows Explorer. Open the
program with the focus on Documents and Settings. If you do not have the
tree view (folder structure on left, lists of files and folders on the
right), add a Folders button to the Standard toolbar. A nice addition
anyhow as it lets you toggle back and forth between tree view and folder
view.

Once you have the two paned view, select "Details" as the View. You should
now see a column showing the dates for each acount folder. I think you will
find that All Users.xxxxx has a more recent date than All Users. You can
safely conclude that the most recent folder is the one created by your most
recent install of XP.

If in doubt at all, copy data files out of the accounts before removing
them. Also you may find that you need to do the "take ownership" steps
mentioned above to grab the data files and to delete the abandoned account
folders.

> Did that. I assume it is ok to delete the other (old) administrator in
> explorer?

Should be ok. May want to take precautions as mentioned above.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 6:36:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:

>
> It sounds like you reinstalled XP in a such a way that it replaced only the
> Windows folder (and the Windows registry) and leaving all other files on
> the hard drive in place. In this case, the Windows registry is rebuilt as
> well and it has no knowledge of your previously install applications.

This is apparently the case.

Thanks for the help!

m

(snip)
Anonymous
January 12, 2005 6:36:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Wed, 12 Jan 2005 15:36:55 GMT, mike gray wrote:

> This is apparently the case.
>
> Thanks for the help!

You're welcome, Mike.
--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 4:59:48 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Sharon F wrote:

>
> You will also need to reinstall any program that will not run as a stand
> alone application (cannot double click the main *.EXE file to successfully
> launch the program).
>
> If you run into a program that will not let you reinstall because it
> detects the files for the old install of the program, you should visit the
> tech support pages for that program online for "manual uninstall"
> directions. Then reinstall the program.

I deleted all old programs via explorer/delete (just right-clicked and
deleted, then emptied the trash). This seemed to reduce the space used
by about half the size of the files (as given by right
click/properties). But that was quite a bit.


> Another useful thing to know as you're cleaning up the current setup, you
> will be denied access to folders and files belonging to the "old you."
> Windows is still protecting those files for that account. You can regain
> access to them by taking ownership:
> HOW TO: Take Ownership of a File or Folder in Windows XP
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=308421

Tried this, but couldn't make it work. Went through all the motions, but
in the end the files were still there and inaccessible.

>>There are multiple administrator, all users, and default users folders.
>>Some are left over from the previous installation, some are newly
>>created. I just have to figure out which are which.
>
>
> One way to figure this out would be using Windows Explorer. Open the
> program with the focus on Documents and Settings. If you do not have the
> tree view (folder structure on left, lists of files and folders on the
> right), add a Folders button to the Standard toolbar. A nice addition
> anyhow as it lets you toggle back and forth between tree view and folder
> view.
>
> Once you have the two paned view, select "Details" as the View. You should
> now see a column showing the dates for each acount folder. I think you will
> find that All Users.xxxxx has a more recent date than All Users. You can
> safely conclude that the most recent folder is the one created by your most
> recent install of XP.
>
> If in doubt at all, copy data files out of the accounts before removing
> them. Also you may find that you need to do the "take ownership" steps
> mentioned above to grab the data files and to delete the abandoned account
> folders.

Deleted the administrator and users with old dates through explorer. No
ill effects, and they're gone now.

Thanks for yer patience and help.

m
Anonymous
January 13, 2005 11:13:42 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

On Thu, 13 Jan 2005 01:59:48 GMT, mike gray wrote:

> Tried this, but couldn't make it work. Went through all the motions, but
> in the end the files were still there and inaccessible.

If using XP Home, you need to boot to safe mode to work with the
permissions of files and folders.

> Deleted the administrator and users with old dates through explorer. No
> ill effects, and they're gone now.
>
> Thanks for yer patience and help.

You're most welcome! Thanks for the update on how everything worked out.

--
Sharon F
MS-MVP ~ Windows Shell/User
!