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CPU Overclocking longevity

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November 12, 2006 11:47:47 PM

Hi i am buying a new system soon, and im debating whether its worth overclocking. How many years does OCing kill of a CPU? I plan to have it for 4-5 years. Also does performance start to decrease eventually due to being pushed over its normal limit?

Thanks in advance,

xx
November 13, 2006 12:02:05 AM

Um well. IMHO (in my opinion)

for example...
Amd 939 4000+ has 1mb cache like the FX55 cpu.
Only difference is the multiplier is lower so i believe upping the FSB to match a FX55 or the TOP CPU of the series, if it has the same core just different multiplier is not going to hurt life span.

Now taking a cpu past the top model series specs and voltage will lower the life span but don't quote me. Only way i had cpu fry is upping voltage to high.
November 13, 2006 12:35:03 AM

I argee with Shata. Well said. Upping the voltages increases heat, which is what stresses the cpu.
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November 13, 2006 12:37:17 AM

Years ago, when I first ventured into overclocking, I was told that as long as the overclocks were kept reasonable, you might shorten cpu life from 10 years to 5 years. A bit more speed would drop it to 3 years. A bit more and you start playing with frying the thing. It isn't just the speed, but the extra voltage and heat that kills the cpu. Also, as voltage gets too high, a thing called voltage migration can set in, that is, current can start jumping between pins.

Since I buy a faster cpu sooner than every 5 years, in fact sooner than every 3 years, I can get away with a bit higher overclocks. In my opinion, if you keep the cpu to 10% over or less, the cpu should last 4-5 years without problem.

As far as performance decreases go, in my experience there is no noticable decrease unless you go for very high overclocks, and then the performance decrease is a very sudden stop, like fried chip time.
a b à CPUs
November 13, 2006 1:29:44 AM

One thing you forgot all you. These ratings are for CONTINUOUS running. Now if you only run your PC say 12 hours a day, that is a life expectancy of 10 years, and if you use it only 8 hours a day, that is 15 years! So go ahead, overclock to hell, just remember to cool down properly, and don't use excessive voltages unless needed!!!

If it works tweak it!
November 13, 2006 2:07:40 AM

Heat is the big killer here.

Plenty of folks with large OCs, but keep the chip cool through water, or large air coolers have no problem with life expetency.

Don't cool properly and a shopping you shall go for a new cpu.

Voltage is the #2 killer, keep some buffer room, remember, your car does not like running wide open at max rpms all the time, but good cooling and oil make a big difference.
November 13, 2006 2:35:01 AM

Quote:
a thing called voltage migration can set in, that is, current can start jumping between pins.


Don't you mean electromigration and jumping between transistors?


I believe that the cpu will not lose life span as long as you stay below the max voltage and the thermal specifications.
November 13, 2006 2:40:08 AM

That is what was intended I am sure. But the same point is being said. Too much voltage for a long time = bad, heat = bad.
November 13, 2006 2:44:51 AM

I would be more worried about the motherboard failing than the CPU. I think I saw a thread somewhere about what components fail the most on you. And there was a poll. On the poll there wasn't to many cpu's that failed but a lot of motherboards if I remember correctly.
November 13, 2006 3:12:37 AM

Yeah, that's what I meant. Wrong terms, or different terms. Happens when I get tired.

I have seen people turn up the voltage too high though, and then they wonder why it failed. Heat and voltage are the big enemies. Trouble is, sometimes someone keeps the heat in line and then keeps turning up the voltage to higher and higher overclocks, then suddenly they got nothing.

Most my computers are on for business use, so they are on 12 to 18 hours a day. That's easier on some parts, harder on others. My gaming computer stays separate, so it gets experimented on. I've only lost one cpu through the years, but half a dozen motherboards and a couple graphics cards. Since I rarely keep a build more than 2 years, I don't worry about short lifespans too much. But when someone wants their computer to last for many years, then I urge a bit of caution. After all, if someone can't afford to run out and buy new parts for when he blows something out, then I think its better not to push the parts hard.
November 13, 2006 3:40:03 AM

OC smart, don't assume or OC stupid, as everybody in this thread replied, 10% over current voltage will increase the risk of frying your chip. It also depends on what chip, Like the E6300 or the Opteron Lines, they usually OC well with out harm to the CPU. And it also comes down to what MOBO will be cranking up the juice to your cpu :wink:
November 15, 2006 2:44:16 AM

Thanks for all the input! When stating motherboards die earlier is that due to OC, or just normal wear n tear?

Thanks again,
November 15, 2006 10:44:03 AM

Well most of the time it is due to overclocking and becasue you in crease the voltages and *ZAPP* there goes one of your power phase regulators which can very easily over load your CPU with volts then and fry it to.

there are lots of different kinds of power phase regulators out there, some are 3 phase some are 6 phase and there are even ones with 9 or more power regulators on the board. the more power regulators you have the less chance there is of one frying and if one does die there is less chance of it overloading your CPU or other hardware.

this is all that i have heard and seen from my own experiences and from hearing how things got fried on my friends computer.
February 9, 2013 5:18:21 PM

darkguset said:
One thing you forgot all you. These ratings are for CONTINUOUS running. Now if you only run your PC say 12 hours a day, that is a life expectancy of 10 years, and if you use it only 8 hours a day, that is 15 years! So go ahead, overclock to hell, just remember to cool down properly, and don't use excessive voltages unless needed!!!

If it works tweak it!


What if you keep it on 24 hours a day but tax the CPU for a couple of hours a day? Is it "on time" or type of usage that is degrading it?

I'm running a i7930 at 3.8 for 3 years now and was hoping for another 18 months. Should I consider throttling back to prolong life?
a b K Overclocking
February 9, 2013 8:31:52 PM

2 things typically shorten life expectency of elctronics including CPUs. Heat and Electricity.

When you overclock you typically create heat by making it work harder. After a certain point if you want to keep OC you have to put more electricty in it, which also creates more heat. It's a vicious cycle.

So if you want longivity of your chip you need to try to get what you can out of your CPU by using the least amount of electricity to make it stable in theory. I say in theory because once I find where it is rock solid I personally bump up the voltage a small notch to make sure it's 110% stable. Heat is easily managable just make sure you have proper cooling and you be fine.

For me I have a e2180 with 50% OC to 3ghz, it was as high as I could go with a small voltage increase, and I mean small amount of voltage was applied. To go any higher I would have to jump up voltage by significant margines. I have had it running for about 6 years now. Had to increase voltage to CPU/RAM one of them was causing an instablility 2years ago so I just increased it slightly and it cleared up and lossened up the timmings back on the ram. So now everything is running perfect again. (ram was highly OC)

So if you want to keep the parts for awhile just do a moderate OC without increasing voltage significantly and keep cooling under control and enjoy the benefits.
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