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Bad axe 2 on newegg

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November 15, 2006 4:24:59 PM

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E1681...

But for $329.99....I don't think so.

Version1 vs the new Version2 ...not even close to being worth the $329.99 pricetag.

It's starting to look like a very scary trend when the last few enthusiast motherboards released have had a pricepoint of or around $300...

What are your guys' thoughts and feelings?

More about : bad axe newegg

November 15, 2006 5:01:54 PM

It´s a nice board, but way overpriced. Like almost all 975 based mainboards.
November 15, 2006 5:02:38 PM

Lets see,
When I purchased my last computer...


great mobo: $180 (MSI...)
Antec PSU: $80 (450watt)
Memory: $100 (per gig, ddr 3,3,3,6)


Now, great mobo: $250-300.
Memory: $200 per gig dual channel
PSU: $189
Related resources
November 15, 2006 5:08:19 PM

I'm with you their

Back in 2002...
My last good mobo = $80
My last good processor = $80
My last good memory = $160
My last good psu = $80

Now...
My new mobo will be = ~$250-300
My new processor will be = ~$344
My new memory will be = ~$315
My new psu will be = ~$339
November 15, 2006 5:20:34 PM

Did not see anything that would lead me to believe that it is a significant upgrade from other 975 crossfires (I may have missed something, but it is certainly not easily apparent). Not sure how price point is justified vs the 680 chipsets with their massive oc limits. I guess it would be satisfactory for our dual gpu ATI brethren but there are a lot of solid $2xx boards with the same abilities.
November 15, 2006 5:59:47 PM

I read an article today by Anand that said he could only get his quad core to 275FSB on the new bad axe 2. He had to up the multi to 12 to o/c the setup. In his words he said his board was a dud at o'cng. I was all set to buy this today too but then balked after i read that. I was also set to buy the evga 680i the other day until i read that it is having issues as well like running hot and HSF's not designed to work with the board.

As far as newegg and their jacked up prices are concerned, go buy at tigerdirect because they are like 10-20% cheaper than newegg on almost everything that i priced out. Newegg is cheaper for some stuff but they are getting REAL bad at gouging prices lately.
November 15, 2006 6:04:24 PM

Cool!...not
I will not spend more than 150ish in m/b no matter what. Another thing I don't get is the continuous overpriced ram. Until last summer was dirt cheap, remember buying my 2*512mb ddr 400 kingston at 38 euros each. Ok ddr2 is faster, but not that much to justify current prices.
November 15, 2006 6:30:53 PM

Yeah, Ram prices are pretty bad right now.
November 18, 2006 3:39:00 PM

Great, now weve got this refined batch of 975X plus a Striker with really sucky vdroop. All we need now is RD600 to beat the crap outta them.
November 18, 2006 3:58:26 PM

Inflation.
-cm
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 18, 2006 4:43:25 PM

I've had good luck with the Foxconn 975X7AB-8EKRS2H. It's the first board I've had with a digital VRM, supremely stable, good overclocker, lots of features, and fast.

This is actually great news because the previous Foxconn boards had been mediocre through several model revisions.
November 18, 2006 5:43:42 PM

Quote:
Inflation.
-cm


Bullcrap. Based on:
Quote:

Back in 2002...
My last good mobo = $80

Now...
My new mobo will be = ~$250-300 [say, $275]


SOOO, that would indicate 36.16% annual rate of inflation. Meanwhile, CPI has been averaging about 2.71% annually, yeaaaah.

It's more like nowadays you get 50x the features integrated into the mobo.

That, and supply and demand. Newegg is just playing the game by taking advantage of limited supply. Welcome to the free market economy.
November 18, 2006 9:18:02 PM

Just don't buy from newegg. If they start seeing their customers go somewhere else then they will take notice. I am pricing out parts for a new box now and every single part I have found minus the hard drives and cpu were 10-20% cheaper at Tigerdirect. The cpu was the same and newegg's OEM pricing on sata drives is always cheaper. Other than that it isn't worth my time to deal with them any longer. I suggest you give others a look too as newegg is no longer the industry leader imo.
November 18, 2006 10:01:14 PM

Yes, you're right. The components of a good motherboard these days require much faster/more efficent/more delicious materials. All this ends up coming to the consumer in cost.
-cm
November 18, 2006 10:46:36 PM

Yes but how much would you have paid back in 2002 for components that performed like the ones we can get now ? (im betting if I could sell those parts back then I could charge a small fortune... lol)
November 18, 2006 11:28:06 PM

Hey,

The 680i boards that are available right now are reference boards and are made by Foxconn for Nvidia and branded for each company such as BFG, EVGA, ECS & there is another I can not recall right now.

That is why you do not see any of the MAJOR players 680i boards out there yet.

How is the report on the 680i's for oc'ing and heat?
November 19, 2006 12:57:34 AM

Quote:
What are your guys' thoughts and feelings?


I think I'm going to be hanging on to my AMD 939 longer than I figured. These mobos are getting out of hand, a long with ram prices, psu prices, anything computer related prices.
November 19, 2006 6:04:47 AM

939 is still pretty damn fast.
-cm
November 20, 2006 8:39:09 PM

Quote:
It´s a nice board, but way overpriced. Like almost all 975 based mainboards.


I agree, the lack of a good RD600 based board is allowing Intel to do whatever they want with the pricing of high-end boards. Another price we pay for the ATI/AMD merger is the delay (or rather disappearance) of RD600 boards. They should have come out around October but now they may never come out at all (unless DFI does release the one they promised).
November 20, 2006 9:11:55 PM

This board has been out for a week now and there is an utter lack of any information about it. I am torn between this and an evga 680i and want to see how the o/c is with the badaxe2 first before i buy. Nobody seems to be that interested in testing this board short of the one or 2 articles that were written with engineering samples and beta bioses back in october.
November 20, 2006 9:33:00 PM

Did you know about Abit's 680i board?

I would scratch out the Evga board for the Abit...
I think its between Abit and Asus in the 680i market...imo
November 20, 2006 11:27:30 PM

Quote:
I think its between Abit and Asus in the 680i market...imo

Depending on the pricing of the Abit, Ive seen as low as 165euros and as high as $320 (all pre-orders of course).
But considering the voltage fluctuations on the Striker and the Digital VRMs on the Abit, its an easy choice.
November 21, 2006 8:16:51 PM

I wouldnt touch anything with VRM built in to the hardware.
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 8:38:40 PM

Quote:
I wouldnt touch anything with VRM built in to the hardware.


Are you saying that you only use server boards, with a removable VRM?
November 21, 2006 9:07:23 PM

I like the looks of the Abit board. After using my NI8 SLI for a year now, I have grown to love Abit boards.

Are they going to be releasing any 650 Ultra boards?
November 21, 2006 9:15:26 PM

Quote:
But for $329.99....I don't think so.

Shop on the day it hits the streets and that's what happens. Patience is a virtue.

Now less than a week later, it can be had for $257 right to your doorstep.

Considering that THG complained of stability problems in half the 975 boards they tested a couple of months ago, I personally don't mind spending a few extra bucks for Intel's reputation for stability. But that's me. I'm still stinging from the crappy Gigabyte motherboard I bought a few years ago.

And it is just a few extra bucks. All the 975 boards are pricey.

It's interesting that someone complained about only being able to hit 275FSB but since C2D doesn't make much of memory bandwidth, why not just crank up the multiplier (which they did). Problem solved.

If you're hell-bent on an Intel board then the -2 is definitely the way to go for C2D. As the VR-Zone link shows, there are quite a few very useful improvements.

Or you can buy the MSI which is almost as expensive. The show stopper for me is that the MSI lacks an optical output.

Or, you can look for the original Bad Axe on closeout. Micro Center was selling them for $200 a few weeks ago.

-Brad
November 21, 2006 9:19:59 PM

Quote:
I wouldnt touch anything with VRM built in to the hardware.


Are you saying that you only use server boards, with a removable VRM?

How'd you guess?
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 9:45:42 PM

Quote:
If you're hell-bent on an Intel board then the -2 is definitely the way to go for C2D. As the VR-Zone link shows, there are quite a few very useful improvements.

Or you can buy the MSI which is almost as expensive. The show stopper for me is that the MSI lacks an optical output.

Or, you can look for the original Bad Axe on closeout. Micro Center was selling them for $200 a few weeks ago.

-Brad


Or you could just get a Foxconn 975X7AB-8EKRS2H for $180. But that would require half a brain or more, wouldn't it? I mean, first you'd have to pay attention to advice, and then you'd actually have to seek out and find a review that tested the board with its later BIOS improvements. And then you'd have to read the review, note that most of the problems identified in THG's comparison have since been fixed, and...oh boy, open your mind to new possibilities. Tough one I know...
November 21, 2006 9:55:41 PM

Foxconn whos that? is that a brand? o.0

LOL.
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 10:10:00 PM

Amazingly, the 975X7AB beat the more popular brands to the digital VRM. What an embarassment for the other companies!
November 21, 2006 10:35:34 PM

Quote:
the 975X7AB beat the more popular brands to the digital VRM.

Youre talking about Intel plataforms right?
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 10:39:45 PM

Let me make this clear to you: 975X7AB came out with a Digital VRM before other major brand 975X boards. Name a 975X board that has a digital VRM. Abit, Asus, Gigabyte, MSI are all certainly beat in this respect.
November 21, 2006 11:00:04 PM

Then you are. I was just saying because the DFI NF590 has digital VRMs too and it was released before the Foxconn, but this is AM2.
November 21, 2006 11:21:26 PM

Quote:
Or you could just get a Foxconn 975X7AB-8EKRS2H for $180. But that would require half a brain or more, wouldn't it? I mean, first you'd have to pay attention to advice, and then you'd actually have to seek out and find a review that tested the board with its later BIOS improvements. And then you'd have to read the review, note that most of the problems identified in THG's comparison have since been fixed, and...oh boy, open your mind to new possibilities. Tough one I know...

Hmmm, 40,000+ posts makes Crashman a surly boy, doesn't it. Or did you just wake up on the wrong side of the blow-hole?

The problem is that my mind is indeed open to possibilities. Namely, the possibilities of how much more potential for aggravation lay ahead for purchasers of a motherboard whose BIOS suffered from such absurdly obvious problems, even if a fix was available for the problems you found.

I look at it this way... A few years ago I purchased a Gigabyte motherboard based on THG's glowing reviews. It turned out to be a piece of $#!+ and the support was awful. A year or so later, three more BIOS updates, four updates to the audio drivers, etc. it was still a piece of $#!+ and the support was still awful. So I wonder how much worse a product can be when THG actually criticizes it.

My confidence in THG is cautious. My confidence in Gigabyte is permanently ruined. They could paint an Intel board in gold leaf and sell it for half price with free passes to Scores' VIP room and I still wouldn't buy it. Likewise after reading about a product shipping with SO MANY defects, I can't see any good reason to buy the Foxconn. Besides, personally speaking, I really do need a serial port and it ain't got one.

On a slightly different note, but vaguely relevant, I own a V6 Honda Accord whose transmissions it was later discovered were known to melt down prematurely. That particular model of transmission has undergone five engineering revisions over the course of six or seven years. The new one that Honda installed under warranty this year was DOA - the car never even made it off the lift - so in went yet another. I can just envision the engineers promising their management on an almost yearly basis, that "this time we've got it licked".

I'm envisioning the same conversations at Foxconn.

-Brad
November 21, 2006 11:24:03 PM

Get good grades in high school so you can go to a great college and get the high paying career of your choice. Then you can afford any computer parts you want. :wink:
Anonymous
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 11:25:46 PM

careful there, it's CrashMan, he is always right, and I a m not kidding, never saw him being wrong....

Just look at his signature and grin =)
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 11:34:25 PM

The board does have a serial port, it's on a breakout plate, and the plate is included. It doesn't have a joystick port though...

So I've been using this board a lot for testing purposes, mostly because it performs so much better than my P965 boards. I haven't had any problems with it. And it's cheap by 975X standards, but that's just a bonus.
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 11:37:42 PM

I know I'm right that the $180 price makes it worth taking a second or third look at, everything else is fodder for debate.
November 21, 2006 11:45:00 PM

Quote:
The board does have a serial port, it's on a breakout plate, and the plate is included. It doesn't have a joystick port though...

You might want to let Patrick Schmid and Bert Toepelt know. They wrote "Foxconn does not cater to legacy users; it does not provide the connectors to use even serial ports."

-Brad
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 21, 2006 11:53:28 PM

http://www.sysopt.com/features/mboard/article.php/12027...

The blue connector is the serial port header, and the breakout cable can be seen in the image at the bottom of the page.

Foxconn may have added the breakout plate in response to THG's complaint, notice that the other site's review is later. Foxconn may also have also done a little bit of work in BIOS, notice that most of THG's BIOS complaints had already been fixed by the second site's review. Finally, THG complained that the board didn't overclock well, but the second site got a great result from it.

That is to say, well, it backs up what I've been saying all along, you have to look for the second round of reviews to see how the board currently stands.
November 22, 2006 12:49:00 PM

Mobo's should have dropped the serial port long ago. Nobody needs either the serial port or the printer port anymore, and if you do, then you shouldnt be buying new mobos, or should just get a usb to serial connector.

Wasted space I say.
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 22, 2006 1:19:34 PM

True, that's why they put it on a breakout plate: To make you happy by not wasting space on the back pannel, and to make him happy by allowing him to add the port without using a USB adapter.
November 22, 2006 1:22:47 PM

I dont want any Serial port available. I want a mobo without the possibility of adding a breakout plate. Temptation is the destructor of a technologic society ren redi redum.

Only a place as big as the internet could be home to a drunk as big as Duffman!
Only a place as big as the internet could be home to an blatter as large as Duffman's!
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 22, 2006 1:36:37 PM

Abit tried listening to enthusiasts, which was a very stupid thing to do. They made a board a few years ago with no floppy, PS/2, serial, or parallel ports. And they didn't sell enough of them to take care of their debts. And now they're owned by another company.
November 22, 2006 1:40:52 PM

Oh, you happen to know the model for that mobo? That may have become my IDOL.
November 22, 2006 2:04:31 PM

Quote:
I dont want any Serial port available. I want a mobo without the possibility of adding a breakout plate. Temptation is the destructor of a technologic society ren redi redum.

Not all of us have the luxury to take that hard line.

I have several very costly routers none of which, however current they may or may not be, support administration via USB, plus an enterprise level KVM switch that is serial only for firmware maintenance. And while those devices are not an everyday requirement, my computer controlled scanner receiver is also serial only and that is a daily requirement. While a USB replacement is available, I can't justify spending $500 just to make a statement.

At the consumer level it looks like serial is dead, but it's a big world out there.

-Brad
a b V Motherboard
a b K Overclocking
November 22, 2006 2:14:44 PM

Awe shnit, my bad, the AT7 and IT7 still had a floppy header for loading the RAID driver at F6 during windows installation. IT'S NOT SUPPOSED TO BE THERE! You're supposed to tell people "You can't load XP on your RAID array because Windows can't find a USB floppy drive? Too bad, go forth and multiply" Yeh, now that would be a great way to impress people.
November 22, 2006 2:15:21 PM

Quote:
Abit tried listening to enthusiasts, which was a very stupid thing to do. They made a board a few years ago with no floppy, PS/2, serial, or parallel ports. And they didn't sell enough of them to take care of their debts. And now they're owned by another company.

Windows has a feature to initiate a crash dump via a set of keystrokes, for debugging purposes.

It works only via PS/2 keyboards :( 


-Brad
November 22, 2006 2:42:23 PM

Quote:
Or you could just get a Foxconn 975X7AB-8EKRS2H for $180. But that would require half a brain or more, wouldn't it?


omg?!! what? i dont know and i wont even take the time to read about it, but MOST of foxconn's boards come with 3, i'll spell it, three, phases on the vcore power, with a very few that have 4, and i have seen one or two with 6-phase

now with that said, overclocking requires EXTREME stability in the vcore, that is why tomshardware suggested to get an 8 phase mainboard to OC the p4 805.... ASUS supports 8-phase, Gigabyte, and now EVGA(nvidia) and MSI... i wont touch abit, cause personally i think their bundles software sucks balls..

i will never buy a foxconn for my personal system, ESPECIALLY a system that will be fiddled with all the way down to the USB frequency....

this is my opinion, and if that board you are "fanboying" does have 8-phase, it will be one of the first in their "performance" line, correct me if im wrong but i believe foxconn has been around for ~4 years.... and all that time ALL i have seen until this year is budget, and mini-boards, and if they tried a performance board it flopped...

i know that you have been posting on that account for 5 years man, but ive been posting on several accounts, for the same amount of time, and i know you have heard this, you can fanboy with reasons once, and once without, PER THREAD plz. if noone in the thread is listening move on man...


on another note about that article "4ghz DIY" on toms mainpage.. i took their advice and bought the board THEY used for the experiment, and it was assured that it would support the C2D, beacuse it wupported everything the c2d needed. well guess what, it doesn't, "due to a hardware limitation".. ASUS says i should go buy the "Pro" to use a C2D...btw the board is the P5WDG2-WS, which was going for 315ish when i got it... it was released on conroe launch day that it would not support.. and the prices plummited, i think you can find it now for 235ish...don't quote me. so the moral of the story is... dont trust everything you read, on this site or any other for that matter ;) 
!