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Scratched XP Home CD Replacement

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  • Hard Drives
  • CD-Rom
  • Windows XP
  • Storage
Last response: in Storage
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November 19, 2006 10:47:13 AM

I have this Win XP Home Edition which I’ve been using since I bought my PC some 3 years ago. Thru necessities of re-installations during those periods, it accumulated scratches and lately displayed errors that failed to load some files. Too late now, cleaning the disc won’t help.

I understand that what I bought from Microsoft is the license, so I should get a CD replacement (either FREE or with nominal fee).

Note: I contacted Microsoft about replacement, but was told to buy new one? What happens to my license then? Anybody out there with same situation? :roll:

More about : scratched home replacement

a b G Storage
November 19, 2006 12:15:54 PM

Yeah, if I were you I'd just buy a new version XP.
XP Home, in my opinion is terrible. Get Pro. I used to do the same thing, reinstall all the time with the Home version, however, very, very seldom would you need to reinstall the professional version. Unless of course you are changing or upgrading motherboards all the time.

Just get the upgrade version, thats all you really need.
If you have the old CD, you can do a full clean install from the upgrade version.
It will ask you to insert your old XP CD to verify that you have a previous version to upgrade from. It searches your old CD for a few key files to verify that you actually have a previous version, then it will tell you to remove it, and on you go with your install. Unless your old CD is completely unreadable, I'd say it will probably work.

Your upgraded version will have it's own license.
And, on a side note, there are only 2 places your XP CD should be at any 1 time. Either in your CD drive, or in a Jewel Case. CD's don't get scratched from use, they get scratched from improper handling and storage.
November 19, 2006 1:04:38 PM

If you were to accidentaly download a torrent file and totally unintentionally accumulate a group of files that may or may not total to a Windows XP Home installation CD as a result, I don't think anyone would mind too much.

You already have a license anyway, it's not like you're stealing anything.
Related resources
November 19, 2006 1:16:54 PM

Quote:

And, on a side note, there are only 2 places your XP CD should be at any 1 time. Either in your CD drive, or in a Jewel Case. CD's don't get scratched from use, they get scratched from improper handling and storage.



owned
November 19, 2006 1:17:21 PM

Quote:
If you were to accidentaly download a torrent file and totally unintentionally accumulate a group of files that may or may not total to a Windows XP Home installation CD as a result, I don't think anyone would mind too much.

You already have a license anyway, it's not like you're stealing anything.


get a job
November 19, 2006 2:00:16 PM

im not sure if its legal or not, but what if you used someone else's cd for the installation and then entered your license# when it prompts for it.i think if its the same as yours (full version or upgrade version )it should work.
a b G Storage
November 19, 2006 2:02:13 PM

Have you tried repairing the disc? You can buy one of those "Disc Doctor" contraptions at any electronics store. I have one and the buffing wheel does a great job making unreadable discs usable again. They cost about $20.
November 19, 2006 2:16:40 PM

When you buy the program, you are also purchasing a license to install and operate it on your computer. Installing the program from another person's disk or a disk image you downloaded on the internet shouldn't be a problem as long as you use the activation key that is associated with your license. As long as you don't use a crack nobody will care. It's not like anybody really gives a flying flip anyway.
November 19, 2006 2:21:49 PM

As far as i recall you should be allowed to send in the defect CD and, once you´ve proven to have a valid liecense key, get a new CD. The only money it should cost you is what you pay at the postal office (2 ways).
November 19, 2006 2:22:01 PM

Ugh...I feel for you. I only tried ringing one of the zombies at Microsoft licensing once to ask a question and what a hideous experience that was, didn't get an answer either. Didn't risk ringing back, another 5 minutes and I might have been tempted to take my own life.

Just wondering if you can manage to make a legitimate backup of the original CD and use that.

Could always try ringing again and hope to get hold of someone sensible, just have a bottle of vodka and the valium to hand.... :roll:
November 19, 2006 2:54:09 PM

Quote:
get a job


I'm not suggesting he totally steal a copy of WXP, I'm just saying that going through the whole process of getting a new copy of a CD that you already own is a bit pointless when you can do it for free.

Just an idea, so no need to tell me to 'get a job', thanks. I've payed for my copy of Windows and I doubt I'll ever upgrade.
November 19, 2006 3:45:41 PM

Quote:
I have this Win XP Home Edition which I’ve been using since I bought my PC some 3 years ago. Thru necessities of re-installations during those periods, it accumulated scratches and lately displayed errors that failed to load some files. Too late now, cleaning the disc won’t help.

I understand that what I bought from Microsoft is the license, so I should get a CD replacement (either FREE or with nominal fee).

Note: I contacted Microsoft about replacement, but was told to buy new one? What happens to my license then? Anybody out there with same situation? :roll:


Honestly, since they'll tell you all they are selling you is a license, they should replace the disc for a nominal fee. The problem with downloading it is that you'll most likely get a cracked version, which won't ask you to input your cd key at all. So I'd either a) pressure microsoft to send you a replacement disc or b) find a friend with one and copy it so you can use their disc with your key.

You used to be able to buy OEM discs that didn't come with a key for cheap (I have one for XP home, actually) then you could just buy licenses seperately. It was cheaper than buying the retail box version for multiple installs i.e. building computers for people. I don't think they sell those openly to the public anymore though.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 19, 2006 3:50:54 PM

Quote:
I have this Win XP Home Edition which I’ve been using since I bought my PC some 3 years ago. Thru necessities of re-installations during those periods, it accumulated scratches and lately displayed errors that failed to load some files. Too late now, cleaning the disc won’t help.

I understand that what I bought from Microsoft is the license, so I should get a CD replacement (either FREE or with nominal fee).

Note: I contacted Microsoft about replacement, but was told to buy new one? What happens to my license then? Anybody out there with same situation? :roll:


You can use any other CD as long as the CD matches the license. If it's an OEM license, you need an OEM CD.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 19, 2006 3:54:06 PM

Quote:
Yeah, if I were you I'd just buy a new version XP.
XP Home, in my opinion is terrible. Get Pro. I used to do the same thing, reinstall all the time with the Home version, however, very, very seldom would you need to reinstall the professional version. Unless of course you are changing or upgrading motherboards all the time.


How did you arrive at that conclusion? Do you know the differences between Home & Pro? I've used both versions and worked on many computers with one or the other version and I can't see any advantage for XP Pro for the home user. It's a myth that Pro is better then Home.

Grumpy
November 19, 2006 10:00:55 PM

Things I did to repair scratched CD: Scrub-clean the scratched surface with a Toothpaste: Yeah, the one used to brush the teeth. worked several times as well to my other scratched CDs. This trick I learned from a modding forum I passed-by once.

Anyway, now it wont work, my CD got really bruised this time (after I'm forced to do 100 re-installations in 60 days - but that was another story). Customer service from Microsoft seemed to mark me, now refuse to activate my key.

The only recourse seems, i have to use a $1.45 bootleg copy (well, they're forcing me to do this) if they won't replace my CD. I'll just pin my CD Key sticker to my picture frame as a bitter reminder of my brush with Bill.....
November 19, 2006 10:46:53 PM

Remember if you use another CD with your key that it has to be the same version, same service pack, same build essentially. That's the trick.
Jo
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 20, 2006 10:18:21 AM

Quote:
Things I did to repair scratched CD: Scrub-clean the scratched surface with a Toothpaste: Yeah, the one used to brush the teeth. worked several times as well to my other scratched CDs. This trick I learned from a modding forum I passed-by once.

Anyway, now it wont work, my CD got really bruised this time (after I'm forced to do 100 re-installations in 60 days - but that was another story). Customer service from Microsoft seemed to mark me, now refuse to activate my key.

The only recourse seems, i have to use a $1.45 bootleg copy (well, they're forcing me to do this) if they won't replace my CD. I'll just pin my CD Key sticker to my picture frame as a bitter reminder of my brush with Bill.....


What type of CD key do you have? XP Home OEM? XP Home Retail?

Grumpy
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 20, 2006 10:22:42 AM

Quote:
Remember if you use another CD with your key that it has to be the same version, same service pack, same build essentially. That's the trick.
Jo


Not true. The CD Key only needs to match whether is Pro or Home and whether it's OEM, Retail, Upgrade or Volume. Here's more information:

Unlocking WinXP's setupp.ini
=========================
WinXP's setupp.ini controls how the CD acts. IE is it an OEM version or retail? First, find your setupp.ini file in the i386 directory on your WinXP CD. Open it up, it'll look something like this:

ExtraData=707A667567736F696F697911AE7E05
Pid=55034000

The Pid value is what we're interested in. What's there now looks like a standard default. There are special numbers that determine if it's a retail, oem, or volume license edition. First, we break down that number into two parts. The first five digits determines how the CD will behave, ie is it a retail cd that lets you clean install or upgrade, or an oem cd that only lets you perform a clean install? The last three digits determines what CD key it will accept. You are able to mix and match these values. For example you could make a WinXP cd that acted like a retail cd, yet accepted OEM keys. Now, for the actual values. Remember the first and last values are interchangable, but usually you'd keep them as a pair:

Retail = 51882 335
Volume License = 51883 270
OEM = 82503 OEM
So if you wanted a retail CD that took retail keys, the last line of your setupp.ini file would read:
Pid=51882335
And if you wanted a retail CD that took OEM keys, you'd use:
Pid=51882OEM

Grumpy
November 21, 2006 3:07:32 AM

Quote:
... (after I'm forced to do 100 re-installations in 60 days - but that was another story). ...

How could you need to do 100 reinstalls on the same PC (or even 20!)?
November 21, 2006 3:53:40 AM

Quote:
... (after I'm forced to do 100 re-installations in 60 days - but that was another story). ...

How could you need to do 100 reinstalls on the same PC (or even 20!)?

I think he was talking about a network. Just a thoery but registering them with MS after imaging all those drives would be major PITA. I guess thats why MS came out with the volume version but I think that you have to jump through some hoops for that ? (not sure since I have no use for a volume copy lol)
November 21, 2006 4:11:18 AM

When i lost my xp pro cd i called them and asked for a replacement.. they asked me for the cd set # and $35 and that was it. I got in the mail a brand new cd and also a new serial #. They never hassled me about sending a replacement.
November 21, 2006 4:45:53 AM

Believe it or not, I did reinstall the same CD on the same PC 100x (averaging 1 reformat every 12 hours). You see, my assembled PC is 3+ years old now, with no changes on hardware made since, and problem came only 2 months ago. As not a software techie guy to tweak around programs, the only remedy I know (during crashes or BSOD, when Safe Modes and System Restore wont work) is to reformat.

Guys from Microsoft got pissed of my regular activation request (on the 20th attempt) that they wont provide me activation codes anymore. I even suspected they zeroed in on my system every time I go online, that while updating, the next sure thing happening is my PC crashes after an hour or so. Now I don't update and even disable auto updates.

What's puzzling is I dont get BSOD if I dont go online (meaning my problem is not hardware). SO, before going online, I did all necessary precautions - firewalls on, Avast Home AV running, use Firefox instead of IE to minimize net predators. Btw, my PC is stand alone.

Anyway, I resigned to my fate of reformatting until such time I can just buy a new PC. My only wish now would be to have my scratched XP Home installer replaced to tide me over.

My PC specs:

P4 2ghz, with Gigabyte Rocket cooler
Asrock P4i45GV
256 MB DDR266 RAM (generic)
Maxtor 40gig 72k PATA (2 partition, NTFS)
D-Link 56k Modem
Antec Lanboy case with 300W PSU
November 21, 2006 4:54:13 AM

Quote:
Anyway, now it wont work, my CD got really bruised this time (after I'm forced to do 100 re-installations in 60 days - but that was another story). Customer service from Microsoft seemed to mark me, now refuse to activate my key.


Assuming you have have an oem version of windows (as you did get it when you got your computer). You should be able be borrow any windows home oem cd from whoever and install it off that and then use your key.

Microsoft seems to be very inconsistant with the way it handles oem licenses. I've heard of people that have done a minor upgrade and then when they try to reinstall Windows, are prompted to call Microsoft only to be told that because their version is oem, that it's tied to their original configuration and they're basically screwed. I myself have been using an oem version of XP home for a few years, that I got off a friend's trashed system and then was able to talk them (after a few calls) into activating it for my system after convincing them that it was not being used on any other system. One major rebuild later and I'm still using the same key.

My point is, keep calling Microsoft after getting (or borrowing a usable disk), until you get someone that'll help you out (don't tell them you've installed it 100 times)!
November 21, 2006 5:00:25 AM

I just read your latest message after posting and I have to ask; why the hell didn't you make sure your install was working properly before activating windows???? You should know you have 30 days to run windows before it forces you to activate...... I'd think that after the first 10 or so screwed up installs, you might realize something was very wrong.
November 21, 2006 6:26:35 AM

I'd like to believe my installs are ok because all are clean install....and I'm able to use it online without hitch for the next 12 hours or 2 days at most. Then, BSOD and crashes again, so off to reformat I go again like a vicious cycle!

Btw, My XP Home is boxed (not OEM) other keys wont work, bought it separately after assembling my PC.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 21, 2006 7:10:50 AM

"...very, very seldom would you need to reinstall the professional version. ...."

WTF?

On which planet are you living?
November 21, 2006 7:17:51 AM

If you don't want to spend the cash on a disc fixer, check with some used video game stores. The ones here fix scratched discs for $3.
a b G Storage
November 21, 2006 10:47:18 AM

Been running XP pro on over 40 PC's for 4 years. Only had to reinstall that I can recall because of a hard drive failure, and I am pretty sure I live on the planet you do, idiot.
a b G Storage
November 21, 2006 10:50:42 AM

YOU may think it's a myth, I think it's a fact, and unless you have problems reading, I alread explained why. Idiot.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 21, 2006 11:04:53 AM

Quote:
YOU may think it's a myth, I think it's a fact, and unless you have problems reading, I alread explained why. Idiot.


This is an explanation? "XP Home, in my opinion is terrible." That's an opinion and just like assholes, everyone has one. You still didn't answer my question. Do you know the differences between Home & Pro?

"Been running XP pro on over 40 PC's for 4 years." BFD, I worked a couple thousand PCs with the majority being XP Home in the last 4 years and didn't see any difference in stability.

Try backing up your myth with facts. Dumbass.

Grumpy
November 21, 2006 2:14:56 PM

Quote:
I have this Win XP Home Edition which I’ve been using since I bought my PC some 3 years ago.


This really makes it sound as though you got your copy of Windows with your system. If that was the case, it'd almost for sure be an oem copy.

Quote:
I'd like to believe my installs are ok because all are clean install....and I'm able to use it online without hitch for the next 12 hours or 2 days at most. Then, BSOD and crashes again, so off to reformat I go again like a vicious cycle!


Wow. So you just go through the entire install process over and over and over again.... Still, you can use windows for up to 30 days without activating it. So considering you like to do a new install every day or so, the activation process shouldn't even matter to you. Also, if you can borrow another windows disk of the same version as your own from someone, you'll have no problem just using your key with it.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 22, 2006 7:17:47 AM

Errrm...yes. Thanks for the compliment.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 22, 2006 9:47:51 AM

I guess we're on a different planet then JITPublisher. I had to reinstall XP Pro just as often as XP Home myself. Maybe we're on the MS-Sucks planet. :lol: 

Grumpy
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 22, 2006 11:08:55 AM

I guess for normal "office" use you won't have to reinstall windows that often. But it is simply a known fact that a Win-System which is used for gaming, working, experimenting and whatever more (no I'm not talking about surfing unsafely and getting virusses) will be a disaster after just a few months. Even weeks.
November 22, 2006 11:56:10 AM

You can use any WIN XP CD, just use the key that was assigned to you.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
November 22, 2006 12:43:50 PM

Quote:
You can use any WIN XP CD, just use the key that was assigned to you.


Not quite true. You can use any Windows XP Home OEM Key with a Windows XP Home OEM CD but not a Windows XP Pro OEM CD.

Grumpy
November 22, 2006 12:51:46 PM

Quote:
You can use any WIN XP CD, just use the key that was assigned to you.


Not quite true. You can use any Windows XP Home OEM Key with a Windows XP Home OEM CD but not a Windows XP Pro OEM CD.

Grumpy

Right. That's what I meant.
November 22, 2006 1:51:49 PM

I don't know what you guys are doing to your machines that require a reinstall every few months.

I have a machine at home that's had the same Windows XP installation for about 3 1/2 years. It's been through 3 motherboards, several hard drives, more hardware changes than I can count, and many software installations, reinstallations, & removals. Still running the same XP installation I put on it in 2003. Works fine every day.

The only things I do to it to keep it running right are:

1. Always run the latest virus protection.
2. Run several different (and decent) types of spyware scanners periodically, but only one that's system-tray resident (I use Spyware Doctor).
3. Run the system file checker (sfc /scannow) once in a while.
4. Keep the system updated with the latest Microsoft patches and patches for your other software.
5. Periodically remove uneeded or outdated software, make sure to delete their leftovers from C:\Program Files.
6. When changing hardware, remove the old hardware from device manager.
7. Periodically run a registry cleaner (I use Registry Mechanic).
8. Back up your important data to a different hard drive and/or different computer.
9. Turn off and get rid of all the "fluff" programs - IMs, animated cursors, wallpaper changers, sound packages, your computer manufacturer's stupid little utilities like jog dial/shuttles, hot keys, CD/DVD auto-launchers, etc. They just junk the machine up.
10. Verify you have properly working hardware. When I install new memory, I always run memtest (www.memtest.org). When I install a new hard drive, I always run Spinrite (www.grc.com). When I install a new processor, motherboard, or cooling solution, I always run Prime95 (http://www.mersenne.org/freesoft.htm). If anything fails, fix it before continuing.
November 22, 2006 2:37:34 PM

All i did when my Windows XP Disk had the same problem is call Microsoft and told them what happened and they sent me a new disk at no cost..... :lol: 
November 22, 2006 3:29:46 PM

Your right on the money. I do PC repairs all the time and using different media will at worse result in a call in activation from MS who will ask you just one question, how many PC do you have this installed on. They have never hassled me if its OEM, upgrade, or standalone. If you answer this question correctly they will give you the activation key as long as you have a valid format key to begin with.


Home and Pro share the same core and about 95% or greater code neither is more reliable than the other. In office setting you may be able to get away without a reinstall in 4 year but with home user habits you will likely want to every year or two for optimal performance.
November 22, 2006 4:16:50 PM

I read the first page of comments and didn't see this mentioned so sorry if it has already been said on the 2nd page. What I do that fixes most messed up cds is to just use a burning program to do a copy of the cd.

I know your thinking that it doesn't install right how could it copy right, well I do this for my music cds and no kidding even if it can't read the disk 100% to play, say it skips a lot, it reads fine when i copy the cd. Gets me a new copy that will play 100% no skips.

Also if doing a straight copy doesn't work my next step is to use a program such as Alcohol 120 to make an ISO of the disk. You can control the read speed that Alcohol 120 will read the cd at while making and ISO file. Slow it down to 1x, it takes a long time, but that should do it. Then of course you burn the ISO onto a cd.

Those 2 things are legal to do, heck make 2 copies and keep one tucked away so your never without a 100% readable cd you can make a copy from.
November 23, 2006 7:09:31 AM

Quote:
I guess for normal "office" use you won't have to reinstall windows that often. But it is simply a known fact that a Win-System which is used for gaming, working, experimenting and whatever more (no I'm not talking about surfing unsafely and getting virusses) will be a disaster after just a few months. Even weeks.


Sorry, I must disagree. I really don't know what kinds of things the people who say this are doing to their computers...maybe they're just unlucky? I've never had problems on this scale, even back when, on my first effort at this kind of thing, I took my hard drive with Windows 98 and other proprietary stuff on it from my old Packard Bell and stuck it in a whole new no-OS barebones with all different hardware and let the device manager figure it all out. That machine ran quite well for years...Everquest, Majesty, surfing, you name it.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 7, 2009 11:44:24 AM

dmk82 said:
When i lost my xp pro cd i called them and asked for a replacement.. they asked me for the cd set # and $35 and that was it. I got in the mail a brand new cd and also a new serial #. They never hassled me about sending a replacement.


Could you share the phone number you called...
I have done a lot of repairs for my family and friends, and have suffered both ends of the MS experience. (1 = GFY in broken english and 2 = Happy to help).
Anonymous
a b G Storage
March 7, 2009 11:56:49 AM

cavornex said:
Believe it or not, I did reinstall the same CD on the same PC 100x (averaging 1 reformat every 12 hours). You see, my assembled PC is 3+ years old now, with no changes on hardware made since, and problem came only 2 months ago. As not a software techie guy to tweak around programs, the only remedy I know (during crashes or BSOD, when Safe Modes and System Restore wont work) is to reformat.

Guys from Microsoft got pissed of my regular activation request (on the 20th attempt) that they wont provide me activation codes anymore. I even suspected they zeroed in on my system every time I go online, that while updating, the next sure thing happening is my PC crashes after an hour or so. Now I don't update and even disable auto updates.

What's puzzling is I dont get BSOD if I dont go online (meaning my problem is not hardware). SO, before going online, I did all necessary precautions - firewalls on, Avast Home AV running, use Firefox instead of IE to minimize net predators. Btw, my PC is stand alone.

Anyway, I resigned to my fate of reformatting until such time I can just buy a new PC. My only wish now would be to have my scratched XP Home installer replaced to tide me over.

My PC specs:

P4 2ghz, with Gigabyte Rocket cooler
Asrock P4i45GV
256 MB DDR266 RAM (generic)
Maxtor 40gig 72k PATA (2 partition, NTFS)
D-Link 56k Modem
Antec Lanboy case with 300W PSU


I can only offer two solutions for your problem.
1) If you are crashing only when you try to go online. Then I would seriously check the firmware for your LAN/WLAN device. As there is a serious conflict of resources when using the device.
2) Your motherboard has a bad component that only fails during use related to going online. I use the term motherboard as I don't see a seperate NIC/WLAN device so I am assuming it is integrated. (of course, the dlink modem could be the problem if that is your internet connection)
3) I would recommend getting a Knoppix CD, Windows Ultimate Boot CD and run your PC from CD so to say, and if it doesn't crash when you go online then it is related to Windows Drivers if it crashes when you go online it is hardware. Of course these are guidelines, as without exact information on what you did and what the result is plays a huge part in the what is really wrong. Seriously, you only need to reinstall Windows once to know if it is Windows fault or hardware related.
PS. You would get far more help with your problem if you posted the exactly what is happening. You seem to be able to post here even though you don't have your PC running online so give it a whirl.
!