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Another step toward quantum computers

Last response: in CPUs
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November 20, 2006 5:53:21 PM

Quote:
"We have resolved a major obstacle for building a particular kind of quantum computer, the phosphorus-and-silicon quantum computer," says Boehme. "For this concept, data readout is the biggest issue, and we have shown a new way to read data."

http://blogs.zdnet.com/emergingtech/?p=413

Still a long ways off, but I thought I'd share this for those who are interested in quantum developments.

While on the quantum topic, I suggest this link for further reading:
http://www.primidi.com/2006/02/23.html
Quote:
Through clever use of beam splitters and both constructive and destructive interference, the researchers can put each photon in a superposition of taking two paths. Although a photon can occupy multiple places simultaneously, it can only make an actual appearance at one location. Its presence defines its path, and that can, in a very strange way, negate the need for the search algorithm to run.

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November 21, 2006 12:15:42 AM

Quote:
"We have resolved a major obstacle for building a particular kind of quantum computer, the phosphorus-and-silicon quantum computer," says Boehme. "For this concept, data readout is the biggest issue, and we have shown a new way to read data."

http://blogs.zdnet.com/emergingtech/?p=413

Still a long ways off, but I thought I'd share this for those who are interested in quantum developments.

While on the quantum topic, I suggest this link for further reading:
http://www.primidi.com/2006/02/23.html
Quote:
Through clever use of beam splitters and both constructive and destructive interference, the researchers can put each photon in a superposition of taking two paths. Although a photon can occupy multiple places simultaneously, it can only make an actual appearance at one location. Its presence defines its path, and that can, in a very strange way, negate the need for the search algorithm to run.


That's beyond actual state-of-the-art computing trends; anyway, a very interesting (& promising) matter; however, aside all 'material' fine-tuning, one of the biggest probs in QC is to avoid involuntary decoherence (aka collapse of the wave function) due to uncontrollable exogenous influences (the system, a photon or a bigger collection of particles, must be in an 'ideal' state of isolation, to avoid any unwanted perturbation); so far, we've only managed to achieve 'real' isolation, a tough one to overcome. :wink:


Cheers!
!