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Homegrown Networks

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March 17, 2006 11:28:14 AM

Three more examples of DIY whole-house networks. Do these inspire you to do your own?

More about : homegrown networks

March 17, 2006 2:31:26 PM

Great artical. To bad you guys didnt write it last month. I set up my dads network. I used a Linksys WRTP54G router to distribute the broadband connection both wired and wirelessly. Also used the intergrated Vonage VoIP adapter to run a phone line to the existing phone distribution board, and the alarm system. Next is a battry backup incase the power goes out, and a media center in the den.
March 17, 2006 2:35:26 PM

I'm posting this for a reader
Quote:
It might be a good idea to combine Homegrown Networks and VoIP to show people how easy it would be just to make the change over to VoIP especially if you already have a Homegrown Network. If you take Mike Rogers setup unplug the phones from the filter and plug that line into a VoIP router you would then be able to run VoIP through out the house and ditch the normal phone line.

Even though some people will use DSL it is still a good option since you will get more features through VoIP than your normal phone lines.
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March 17, 2006 3:59:19 PM

Plug in and save $$$$
March 18, 2006 2:57:08 PM

I have set up my own network using Leviton modules. It works fine. I am looking for an good way to label my CAT5e cables. I noticed one of the examples had the heat shrink wrap type wire label; however the CAT5e cables looked like they were purchased (i.e. not created with a crimp tool). I am wondering if you can buy shrink wrap type labels that are not tube shaped, thus not possible to fit over the existing male end jack. I am considering a product called Unitag but would prefer the compact and clean look of a shrink wrap type label. (see: Figure 11: A creative 19 inch rack two right cables above the Linksys) TIA for any help!
March 18, 2006 8:28:13 PM

They do make heat srink tubing for labeling. Should be able to find at any good electronic shop. They also make a labeler specificly for labeling wire and cable. Use to use them all the time when I worked. They were on the expensive side. But we did use them alot. It was sure nice going back to a job with everything marked.
March 20, 2006 1:52:12 PM

Those blue cables were purchased, and the labels were from the manufacturer. I didn't put those on. I personally wouldn't label those cables, I would make sure that the patch panel is lableled. As my uncle is a home builder and built his house, I will get letter sized copies of the floor plans, and label those. Then we can post them on the wall. If you don't have that option, you can make basic floor plans with word, excel, or even paint. They don't have to be perfect, just enough to tell what you are talking about.

As for the wall jacks, I will just label them with a P*Touch, and will match the wall jacks to the port #.
March 28, 2006 8:41:10 PM

I loved this article. I'm planning on buying a new home some time in the next year and this is something I was planning on doing with it, this guide will help a lot when I get to that point.
April 5, 2006 7:45:18 PM

Quote:
Those blue cables were purchased, and the labels were from the manufacturer. I didn't put those on. I personally wouldn't label those cables, I would make sure that the patch panel is lableled.


Depending on how complex your network is, its never a bad idea to label cables. You can have all the drawings and diagrams you want, but if you have two or more unplugged cables amongst a dozen, or 2 dozen connected, especially if the wiring is not tied up neatly, it can get frustrating as to which one ran where or which port it came from.
!