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PSU Keeps Blowing

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November 22, 2006 9:40:49 AM

Hi there,

In our office of 20 PCs 1 of the PC's PSU keeps blowing 8O.
I don't think it has something to do with the wall outlet, because it runs on clean power.

I read the PC docmentation and 235w should be fine
The PSU Blows About Every 3 weeks (It blew the 3rd PSU now)
PC Specs

Win98SE
733 MHz Intel Celeron
64Mb SDram
235w PSU
There's no CD ROM or Floppy

Thanks A Mill
Vincent

More about : psu blowing

November 22, 2006 9:59:52 AM

probably the mobo gone bad?
wouldn't invest too much in that old computer
November 22, 2006 11:41:24 AM

Hmm... you sure you have clean power? Are your PC's connected to a surge protector or straight to the wally? Might want to try that and see if it blows... I'm assuming you rent the office building, and managments always lies... trust me, my parents are one of them =P
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November 22, 2006 12:14:20 PM

clean power, I have heard that before and proved it wrong on many occasion.

is there ANY other electrical loads on that circuit (im thinking of large laser printers, electric motors (even what you find in a fridge), anything other than simple lighting (even flourescent can cause problems)). then they switch on/off they can put a hell of a spike on the power source.

One of my customers had a similar situation in his home, his pc kept popping supplies. he insisted on the fact he had good power. then we loaned him a UPS for the pc, no more power supply problems. he had power company come out and monitor his lines. they were the WORST they had ever seen. and this guy is an executive for the power company!

needless to say, if the supply is not being overloaded from the pc (dont sound like from your system description), then it is either of 2 things, really crappy supplies, or the power comming in.
November 22, 2006 1:38:04 PM

Definately put a UPS in series with the pc.
November 22, 2006 2:02:49 PM

You could increase the amperage of the circuit breakers.
November 22, 2006 2:33:56 PM

all increasing the amperage of the breakers is going to do is cause a fire when the wiring in the wall is overloaded.
November 22, 2006 2:35:01 PM

yeah, most wires are only rated for specific amperage... and trust me, when you shoot more electricity through copper wires than they can handle... bad things happen...
November 22, 2006 2:50:35 PM

What? How is that going to fix his problem?

Vincent465,
First, make sure that you are not buying cheap chinese power supplies. When the computer takes a dump you can always reuse the PS. A good power supply that encounters a short in the board etc. should shut itself off before blowing up. Second, definitely get a small 400va UPS. American Power Conversion (APC) makes resonably priced, trustworthy units. Remember, just like you don't want a crap PS you don't want a crap UPS. If I was you I would have them on all of the computers because the power is never, and I mean never, clean. Look for a sale or call APC and see if they have a volume purchase discount. If you do get some UPSs, usually what goes bad is the batteries and you can go to a battery outlet and get replacements pretty cheap. Battery warehouse etc.
November 22, 2006 2:51:51 PM

Check the polarity of the outlet. Had one that was reversed and it blew mine. Some times they do get wired backwards, see this all the time!
November 23, 2006 6:49:45 AM

Hi there everyone :lol: 

Problem solved (Or so I hope) , it turns out that management was indeed lying :evil:  . The PC wasn't running on clean power.

Thanks alot for the advice...I really appreciate it. :D 

Vincent465
November 23, 2006 9:31:56 AM

Quote:
The PC wasn't running on clean power.

Out of curiosity, how did you figure that out? Did you go with a UPS and it fixed the problem?

-john
Anonymous
a b ) Power supply
November 23, 2006 10:11:59 AM

Polarity of the outlet? Dude, I don't think they are using direct current....
November 23, 2006 12:22:06 PM

Hi there John,

I got the company's electrician out to test the wall outlet and he seems to know what he is talking about.

Vincent
November 23, 2006 1:26:52 PM

Glad to hear you fixed the problem.I always hate it when things crap out for any reason.I've been using a ups for over two years now and i change it once a year just to be safe.Need a bigger one these days but hey it does cost money.Later.

Dahak

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November 23, 2006 10:24:55 PM

Quote:
Polarity of the outlet? Dude, I don't think they are using direct current....
DC or AC some electronics are highly sensitive than others. Most of the time its fine, but more often its for saftey reasons.

Vincent465 did the electrician say that you are having a "brown out"(low voltage)? hope ya got it fixed. and good luck!
November 23, 2006 11:34:17 PM

Quote:
Polarity of the outlet? Dude, I don't think they are using direct current....
DC or AC some electronics are highly sensitive than others. Most of the time its fine, but more often its for saftey reasons.

Vincent465 did the electrician say that you are having a "brown out"(low voltage)? hope ya got it fixed. and good luck!

Erm, AC outlets DO have polarity. In North America the narrow pin, with copper-coloured screws, is the "high" side. It is 115 Vac (approx) against ground. The wide pin with silver-coloured screws is "Neutral" It is the grounded distribution leg and should be at ground potential or close to it. For 230 volts the black and red wires are opposites sides, each 115v against the neutral in the middle.

Many AC devices with polarized plugs run the expected neutral wire to chassis ground with a resistor and capacitor in lieu of green-wire ground. If the polarity of the wall soclet is switched then 115 volts is being sent to the chassis, even with a ground connection also that is sending localized dirty power to some part of the circuit that should be at 0-volts. Of course this presents a safety hazard, but is all-to-common an error.
!