I have a RAID 0 Question?

well, im planning of purchasing two Identical 320 GB hard drives and set them in Raid 0... I want to know if the computer is going to read both hard drives as a single 320 GB hard drive, or 640 GB hard drive. (320x2=640). Thanks
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  1. Quote:
    well, im planning of purchasing two Identical 320 GB hard drives and set them in Raid 0... I want to know if the computer is going to read both hard drives as a single 320 GB hard drive, or 640 GB hard drive. (320x2=640). Thanks

    None of the above, RAID0 plays out as 2x320GB HDD's in a "striped" array.
  2. Quote:
    well, im planning of purchasing two Identical 320 GB hard drives and set them in Raid 0... I want to know if the computer is going to read both hard drives as a single 320 GB hard drive, or 640 GB hard drive. (320x2=640). Thanks


    It will show about 600MB in Windows.
  3. ~640GB obviously :?
  4. The Raid 0 striped set will show up in windows as 1 drive with about 580-600 meg of harddrive space.
  5. Yup, about 600 MB after a NTFS fomatting in XP with 2 320 HDD's.
    I use 2 250's in RAID 0 and it only shows 434 after format, not 500 as one would think.

    Side note, it will only show 300 if you run in RAID 1 (mirror) even though you still used 2 320;s in there. That is more for data safety than performance thoughput in RAID 0.

    Also, check if using a newer serial HDD that the SATA II (3.0g) feature is enabled in both your controller and the drives.

    I used a new mainboard that supported RAID and serial II, however the drives initially were set to SATA 1 feature. I had to use floppy that came with the drives to enable the SATA II in the drives- Now were smokin'

    I use mine for digital video and gaming and it's great!

    Have a great holiday!

    Del ;-)
  6. Quote:
    ~640GB obviously :?


    What do you mean - 640MB is enough for anyone's uses - who on earth could need any more than that :wink:
  7. Just for clarity the reason that you will see less space in Windows is that 1GB is actually measured differently by hard disk manufacturers and OS's.

    For hard disks, 1GB = 1,000,000,000 bytes
    For OS, 1GB = 1,073,741,824 bytes

    So a 320GB drive will show:

    320 * 1,000,000,000 / 1,073,741,824 = 298 GB in Windows.

    If you give a flying f**k about this, go here for more info:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gigabyte

    It's a pretty strange state of affairs, but hey that's what makes life interesting eh?
  8. Quote:
    Side note, it will only show 300 if you run in RAID 1 (mirror) even though you still used 2 320;s in there. That is more for data safety than performance thoughput in RAID 0.


    Dont RAID 1 give more performance than RAID 0?

    i mean RAID 0 is just stripe and difference data on the disks, RAID 1 mirror, it can read from 2 disks at same time, so should the read-rate not be alot higher too as the disks can then provide data faster looking at the interfaces for drives is normaly way faster than the disks?
  9. i'm sure this is probably a dumb question, but i dont know anything about raid. i have to harddrives setup right now on my dell 8100. i dont think they're in a raid setup. if i wanted to set them up in raid, would i have to reformat both drives or could i just change the configuration?
  10. Quote:
    i'm sure this is probably a dumb question, but i dont know anything about raid. i have to harddrives setup right now on my dell 8100. i dont think they're in a raid setup. if i wanted to set them up in raid, would i have to reformat both drives or could i just change the configuration?

    Yes, you must re-format to change from single drives to any RAID.
    You could use Norton Ghost to image the drive and then set it up as RAID and restore from your image.

    *There might be some RAID 1 cards that support adding a second drive and mirroring from the 1st W/O formatting.
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