D-Link DSM-G600 NAS

Manufacturers continue to play with NAS configurations in their fight for marketshare. This one combines media serving, gigabit Ethernet, wireless and BYOD features. What do you think?
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  1. Although I think you guys did a fair review of, at the time, a mediocre product, I'm utterly stumped as to why the review was performed on hardware RevA unit!

    RevB has been selling now for at least 4months and is the only version I've seen on retailers shelves. The RevB box improves on many of the RevA's shortcomings. Not the least of which is a faster Freescale PowerPC based CPU. On the feature side, the RevB supports FTP access, user creation, and emailing alerts/logging... all features that were noted in the review as being hidden and possibly broken. In addition it DOES support NTFS mounted partitions, though in read-only mode. The RevB is also imminently more hackable via a wget hack than what Jim had to go through with the RevA.

    [disclaimer] I don't mean to come across as a DSM evangelist, but I do own one (RevB). It's not perfect, but in my situation, and for the price, it worked for me. [/disclaimer]

    I just have to ask... How much value is this review going to be for someone looking to purchase a NAS if it's based on an older hardware revision, with less features that's scarcely available in channels anymore, if at all?

    Far be it from me to dictate anything... But may I make a suggestion? Tim, and Tom's Networking by extension, has a long history of making updates to reviews when new firmware or updates become available. Is it possible to put a RevB DSM-G600 though it's paces and update this review?

    I know, personally, I'd like to see how a RevB DSM-G600 stacks up to the competition; but more importantly I think it would give a prospective NAS buyer a more current, fair comparison on which they can base their future decisions.
  2. I would just like to agree with QBiN. The version "B" running firmware 1.01 is a vast improvement over the A version.

    Please note that the "B" version also has FTP capabilities, and if I recall correctly (the box is not in front of me right now), it has the capability to do a scheduled automated FTP for backup(not a feature that I use, though).

    And as to your analysis of the cost of the unit, a lot of people have spare hard drives lying around that, for all practical purposes, are "free".

    Another plus of this, as compared to boxes like the Netgear SC101, is that it supports SMB directly, so it will serve files to Windows, Apple, and Linux boxes (a definite plus).

    Finally, the comment that this does not offer DHCP or firewall over the wireless network. That is just plain STUPID. This is an "Access point" and NOT a "wirelss router." Show me another box that is just an access point that has that stuff.

    Another note on file systems... I had to pull apart a USB enclosure to liberate a drive to use in my DSM-G600. So, I had this empty USB enclosure, and I had a couple of spare CD-Rom drives lying around. I make a USB CD-Rom drive, and plugged it into my DSM-G600. The box mounted the drive, and presented the CD-Rom filesystem as a new share in a matter of seconds. This is pretty cool, and I can think of some interesting uses for being able to remote-mount a CD-Rom. I will have to try a DVD drive someday soon.

    Here is my list of the problems with the unit:

    1) Performance is a little on the slow side, but typical for this class of device. I believe that there is some overclocking potential in the processor. I will play with this one day.
    2) Does not spin down hard drive (but this may be fixed later).
    3) Fan is loud. I may add a thermal circuit to control this one day too.
    4) I have found a "microsoft office" bug. Copy a word or excel file to the unit. Open it, edit it, and click on the "save" button. Your computer will lock up for a minute or two. I have seen this using Office 2003 on XP and Office 97 on 98SE.

    Good things about the unit:
    1) If you have a hard drive lying around, it is only $150.
    2) Works with all operating systems, including Linux and Mac
    3) Manufacturer seems intent on upgrading the firmware.
    4) Potential for some cool hacks.
    5) Can mount and share a USB CD-Rom
    6) Easy to set up.
  3. You mention the Rev. B uses a PowerPC processor, could you enlighten me as to which one? Thanks.
  4. Hi Guys, thanks for the feedback.

    As far as the Rev A/B issue, I can only test what D-Link sends. We requested a review unit, and reviewed what we were sent.

    Maybe I didn't get the point across on the wireless capabilities, but what I was trying to say is that you'd get more bang-for-the-buck with most any of the inexpensive access point/routers that are on the market today. As long as you are going to add wireless to your net, you might as well go with something that will give you more features and more flexibility.

    Jim Buzbee
  5. Quote:
    You mention the Rev. B uses a PowerPC processor, could you enlighten me as to which one? Thanks.

    I believe it's the Freescale MPC8241 (PowerPC 603e derivative) or a close variant there of. Although, that's from memory last time I installed a drive in mine.

    Jim's review of the Iomega StoreCenter had a link to Freescale's page for this CPU:
    http://www.freescale.com/webapp/sps/site/prod_summary.jsp?code=MPC8241&nodeId=018rH3bTdG8655

    Jim, to your point about the eval unit sent to you by DLink. It comes as a surprise to me, if not most of us, that DLink would send an old model. That definitely does not speak well for them and is an obvious blunder on their part.

    I have to tread carefully here, because I'm a huge fan of Tim and Jim's work (and have, in fact, emailed Jim to that effect in the past), and I mean no disrespect nor am I intending to call anyone out. That said, given the amount of research and testing that goes into a review, I'm just surprised that the RevA/B issue and it's impact on the review was not even mentioned, if it was known. It still represents an oversight.

    Is this the result of different sourcing methodologies (requesting an eval vs. going to the retailer to get a true sample of what buyers are getting)?

    As is, for whatever reason (not pointing fingers), the results were outdated as soon as they were released. For that reason, and for the benefit of enthusiasts and buyers, I still feel an update to the article is in order IMHO.
  6. Quote:
    Jim, to your point about the eval unit sent to you by DLink. It comes as a surprise to me, if not most of us, that DLink would send an old model. That definitely does not speak well for them and is an obvious blunder on their part.


    Or maybe there wasn't a Rev B when D-Link sent it to Jim. Everything has to be a blunder, mistake or screw-up.

    I am sure Jim didn't write the article in 10 minutes after he received the DSM-G600 this morning.
  7. Typical Duh-Link product, stuff that almost works, stuff that fits the marketing definition of "works" (Rendesvous with our setup page!), and just plain broken stuff. Thanks for the warnings!
  8. Quote:
    Or maybe there wasn't a Rev B when D-Link sent it to Jim. Everything has to be a blunder, mistake or screw-up.

    I am sure Jim didn't write the article in 10 minutes after he received the DSM-G600 this morning.


    Check out this thread:
    http://forumz.tomshardware.com/network/Review-Iomega-StorCenter-Network-Storage-Drive-ftopict20837.html
    On 2/27, Tim said they'd begin to try to get a DSM-G600. The RevB has been out much longer than that. I know because I've had one running in my closet since long before that. So while it didn't take 10min, it certainly didn't take 10months either. I guess you didn't know about that thread, though.

    Quote:
    Typical Duh-Link product, stuff that almost works, stuff that fits the marketing definition of "works" (Rendesvous with our setup page!), and just plain broken stuff. Thanks for the warnings!


    Tim & Jim, this reader's opinion serves *exactly* as case in point to what I mentioned earlier. Please consider revisiting this.
  9. I have emailed my marketing contact at D-Link asking why RevA product was supplied for review instead of RevB and will let you know what I learn.

    As for revisiting this review, that's unlikely. Our reviews take a good deal of time and there are plenty of other products waiting for review. While I wish that we could review every "Rev" version of a product, that's not practical.

    [Rant on]
    Manufacturers are constantly updating products, usually not changing product model numbers in a way that's visible other than reading the actual product box itself. This puts online buyers at a distinct disadvantage.

    This practice is especially unfair to consumers when important changes to features and/or performance are made in a "Rev" model.

    If manufacturers don't think the differences in "Rev" products are significant enough to warrant new model numbers (and the associated marketing costs), then that's how we'll play the game, too.
    [Rant off]

    QBiN's summary of RevA/B differences covers everything except possible performance differences (thanks for providing it, by the way) and will have to do as a review "update".
  10. Quote:
    [Rant on]
    Manufacturers are constantly updating products, usually not changing product model numbers in a way that's visible other than reading the actual product box itself. This puts online buyers at a distinct disadvantage.

    This practice is especially unfair to consumers when important changes to features and/or performance are made in a "Rev" model.

    If manufacturers don't think the differences in "Rev" products are significant enough to warrant new model numbers (and the associated marketing costs), then that's how we'll play the game, too.
    [Rant off]

    I agree with you 100%, Tim.

    If DLink is that "asleep at the switch", then they ought to bear the bad press. However, it'd be nice if just a mention was made in the article that a newer Rev and firmware exist if the reader so chooses to look into it on their own.
  11. That's a good compromise. I'll make it so.

    Thanks, QBiN!
  12. I was wondering what the speeds were in comparsion to a drive connected to a PC via USB 2.0. Are Gigabit NAS drives faster that a USB 2.0 connected drive?

    The reason I ask is that I have an HP 3210xi All in one Printer (which can be networked or USB). It has a memory card ready built into it. When I transfer files over the network ; it is dog slow. When I transfer over USB it is much faster.
  13. Generally, USB 2.0 connected drives are going to outperform even gigabit connected NAS since direct-connected drives don't have the additional network protocol overhead.
  14. Quote:
    QBiN's summary of RevA/B differences covers everything except possible performance differences (thanks for providing it, by the way)


    So I did some homework and read up on IOzone. For the sake of those interested, I followed the guidelines set by Tom's Networking, listed here:
    http://www.tomsnetworking.com/2004/03/02/how_we_test/
    And produced some updated Performance number for the RevB.

    Before I list them, here's how my setup differs... IOzone was run from an AthlonXP 2100+ with 512MB of RAM with a 3Com 3C980C 100Mb NIC across two daisy chained 100Mb switches to the DLink. I don't have a gigabit NIC to test, so these tests will only reflect 100Mb numbers. The DLink has a 300GB Western Digital (WD3000JB) Special Edition drive w/ 8MB of cache.

    So the fact that I'm not using a crossover directly to the NAS may result in less that optimal numbers, because these switches also handle ethernet traffic for my other PC's to/from the internet... but you may be surprised at some of the results.

    These results are only for the RevB model. I didn't compare them to any other NAS devices out there because I don't have that raw data. However, I made the scales the same as the ones in the review so you can compare side by side with the ones from the original review.

    So without further delay:
    (Click on graphs to enlarge)
    Read Results:
    http://home.comcast.net/~qbin1976/DSM-G600-Read-small.PNG
    Even disregarding cached performance, the RevB already shows considerable improvement in reads over the RevA.

    Write Results:
    http://home.comcast.net/~qbin1976/DSM-G600-Write-small.PNG
    The caching effect makes this difficult to see, but it appears the write performance is a bit lower than the RevA.

    Now, to for the 128MB File Transfer performance:
    Read:

    http://home.comcast.net/~qbin1976/DSM-128MB-Read-small.PNG
    Again, we see clearer indication the RevB is faster in reads than the RevA.

    Write:
    http://home.comcast.net/~qbin1976/DSM-128MB-Write-small.PNG
    Write is definitely slower.

    My observations:
    My setup is less optimal than THG's. More of an average user's setup than a direct crossover would be. I should get WORSE results if the RevA and RevB perform similarly with all else held equal. That said, I'm surprised that read performance of the RevB at 100Mb shows an average improvement of over 20%! Conversely, write performance appears to be down about 5% on average. These are interesting results, to say the least.

    I'd like to see how the 1000Mb fares, but that'll have to wait.
    Thoughts? Comments? Flames?

    Anyone interested in a "Hacking the DSM-G600" post?
  15. What file system are you using? Since EXT3 has some primitive journaling, I would expect it to run slower than EXT2 for writes. Reads should be the same speed for either file system.

    Good job, QBin.

    My experience in writing large files is that I get 5.5MB/s read and 4.5MB/s write. This is using a WD 160GB with 2MB cache, and transferrling gigabyte-sized files.

    Once I played around with FTP, and got 6.5MB/s read.
  16. Wow, QBiN, you've been busy with plots and everything! Thanks for running the tests. Looks like you've been quite thorough.

    Quote:
    My setup is less optimal than THG's. More of an average user's setup than a direct crossover would be. I should get WORSE results if the RevA and RevB perform similarly with all else held equal.


    As long as you are using switches (not hubs), you don't need to worry about other LAN traffic affecting results, since any switch today is non-blocking. This means it will support wire-speed (100Mbps in this case) traffic on all ports simultaneously.

    We normally run NAS tests with iozone machine and NAS connected to a switch anyway. Jim used a direct connection for the gigabit tests only because he doesn't have a gigabit switch.

    Iozone test results are very dependent on the computer used, especially for cached results. So I wouldn't try to draw too many conclusions from peak (cached) result differences.

    But the 128MByte test results should be reasonably apples-to-apples, since they are relatively free of caching effects.

    Again, good job, QBiN, and thanks for running the test.
  17. Quote:
    What file system are you using? Since EXT3 has some primitive journaling, I would expect it to run slower than EXT2 for writes. Reads should be the same speed for either file system.

    Good job, QBin.

    My experience in writing large files is that I get 5.5MB/s read and 4.5MB/s write. This is using a WD 160GB with 2MB cache, and transferrling gigabyte-sized files.

    Once I played around with FTP, and got 6.5MB/s read.

    Thanks guys.

    Yeah, I get 1~2Mbps faster transfer rates via FTP than SMB. Given that the DLink uses Samba as it's SMB implementation, it's probably just a performance different between the Samba daemon and wu-ftpd.

    I believe my DLink's drive is formatted EXT3, so that could explain the slower writes. Good call.
  18. Quote:
    I believe my DLink's drive is formatted EXT3, so that could explain the slower writes. Good call.

    Yup. Ext3 is the internal drive format. FAT/FAT32 for drives connected to the USB ports (which we didn't test).
  19. Just a heads up for anyone buying the DSM-G600 I don't know if anyone else had this problem, but watch where the wires end up on the power plug to the IDE drive. On my unit they "sprung" out after putting the cover back on and blocked the fan from turning.

    It was dead quite when it powered out and I smuggly thought my "Rev B1" (Yes B one) was a new hardware rev and Dlink had supplied a thermostat with the switch.

    Alas, I watched the temp climb and climb (stablizing at 127 degrees F) and the fan didn't start up. I reopened the case to check it any plugs were not seated and pushed the wires out of the way. The the fan is now working fine.

    The noise is not as bad as I'd expected based on the previous posts, but I put a new Seagate Barracuda drive that ony puts out 25 db's and that is probably part of the reason. If you get this unit I'd recommend turning on the email temperature alarm just in case the wires spring back again.

    I'll probably open up the case tomorrow and try and anchor the wires more firmly. There's not a lot of room or places to tie off the wires. PS the installation and setup were flawless but the setup instructions were a little sketchy.

    Steve
  20. Hi, new board member here.

    Very nice review and excellent thread.

    I own the DSM-G600 (rev B, fw 1.02eu). Since this device is quite loud I would like to put it away somewhere. So I want to use it's wireless capabilities.

    In the review it is mentioned that a connection was made as a wireless client. However, it is not detailed how this was accomplished. I'm really curious about the settings used because I just can not make the DSM-G600 connect to my access point (yes, other devices connect just fine and i put the mac in the access list).

    I'm using WPA-PSK with aes encryption. Since this didn't work I set my AP to accept both AES and TKIP (the AES option is greyed out in the web interface of the DSM-G600). Both did not result in a connection however. Did anybody succeed in using WPA-PSK?

    cheers,

    Fer
  21. OK, for the record: after trying for hours with all versions of firmware I could lay my hands on (1.00, 1.01, 1.02eu) and reading the user reviews on newegg (google cache since the product has been removed) I have to conclude that WPA doesn't work in client mode for revB at least. But I'd like to be proven wrong though.

    fer
  22. GAK !
    I just got home with this from CompUSA, was pretty psyched and hooked it up and it's working HOWEVER, I popped into this website (Toms Hardware is a favorite) and read this "rev. A1" - "rev. B" controversy.

    Damn CompUSA just rec'd this unit so I didnt even give it a look. As it turns out, it's REV A1.
    So, I only have another 12 days or so to return it. It seems to be working fine, I am about to load up the 1.01 firmware. So how bad is this in comparison to the REV B version? Are there enough extra features to return this unit? (note: I have no intention of using FTP or HTTP access and the fan on this unit is quiet)

    I'd appreciate your thoughts

    Thanks, LK4
  23. Return the A1. You can thank me later.
  24. This looks like a pretty good choice for the price and my particular needs. I would like to ask a dumb question before rushing out to buy one.

    1:?: Is it possible to backup my PC directly to this unit, using the USB port on my PC and on the G600?
  25. No. Definately not through the USB. The G600 is a USB master, and cannot possibly act as a slave. The ONLY way to hook this thing to a PC is through a net work cable or a wireless network link.

    All you have to do is hook the unit up to your network and map it as a drive. Then, you run your backup software to the new drive. The interface will be a bit pokey, but will work.

    One more note on mapping this (or any newtork drive). Map it as a high letter (like Z:). I have two hard drive and two optical drives. That makes the next available letter on my computer G:. The problem is that if I map this to G: and plug in a USB drive, windows wants the USB to be G: also, so I cannot access it. Putting the network drive on Z: makes everything work fine. This is not a problem with this unit, but a problem with Windows not somehow seeing a mapped network drive as being a drive at all.
  26. Quote:
    Is it possible to backup my PC directly to this unit, using the USB port on my PC and on the G600?

    No.
  27. :D Thanks for the information. Your reviews are VERY informative.

    :idea: I was intrigued by the LaCie models since it had the ability to be attached as a USB drive, for the speed, while still serving as a NAS device. Then I read where you found that there was a 2GB file size limitation and while you can break past this boundary, you will then sacrifice the USB functionality. So I guess I will sacrifice direct connect USB performance: for scalabilty by adding additional usb attached drives, large files, etc..

    :!: I really enjoyed your articles on hacking the Linksys NSLU2. Actually, I have enjoyed all your reviews!
  28. :) Thanks so much for your reply, advice and answering my question. I will continue with reading other product reviews and see if there are other candidates.
  29. I have a rather large music cd collection and a significant investment in stereo hardware. I have been considering the purchase of a DSM-320 media player because it is wireless and has an optical output. In order to store a couple of thousand cd's worth of mp3's I also require a network storage device. I am looking at the DSM-G600 because it is compatible with the media player and my computer would not have to be involved in streaming audio files. Does this seem like the right choice or are there other more appropriate devices available?

    Thanks.
  30. Quote:
    Manufacturers continue to play with NAS configurations in their fight for marketshare. This one combines media serving, gigabit Ethernet, wireless and BYOD features. What do you think?



    Cons • No print server
    • No FTP or HTTP file access
    • Noisy fan
    • No backup features

    That automatically puts alot of people out. Also Why would you want to add a NAS on a wireless connection? Extremely slow if you ask me it would be quite the bottleneck.
  31. Quote:

    Cons • No print server
    • No FTP or HTTP file access
    • Noisy fan
    • No backup features


    No Print Server -- Correct.

    No FTP or HTTP file access -- WRONG. FTP is supported. Not fast, but faster than SMB

    Noisy Fan -- Well, that is rather subjective, but I can't say that I disagree.

    No backup features -- WRONG. It does have the ability to schedule itself to backup remotely. I have not tried it, but the menu is there.

    Of course, this refers to the "B1" version of the hardware.
  32. Thanks for the reply. Here is my reasoning. I have one computer configured primarily for gaming (which I don't do) that my son uses often. According to the D-link description of the G-600 it offers the following...

    STREAM DIGITAL MEDIA CONTENT TO UPnP™ AV COMPATIBLE MEDIA PLAYERS
    Backup your music, photo, and video collections to the DSM-G600 for safekeeping. Then enjoy the rewards of the built-in UPnP AV media server as you stream digital content to a compatible media player (such as those found in D-Link’s MediaLounge™ product line). This feature is highly convenient as it allows you to turn off a computer that would normally be needed for this same function.

    The statement "allows you to turn off a computer" is what intrigues me. It implies that the computer could also be tied up playing Rome Total War without affecting audio file streaming to the media player. I don't know that having a dedicated internal drive sharing the disk controller would accomplish that and the media player is a wireless device anyway.
  33. i just dont see how this can be done wirelessly withought hangups. Wireless rates are horrid and I dont see how they can be good for streaming large video and music files.
  34. Hi all ,

    I have just recently purchased a DSM G600 and have been tying hard to configure it ever since thern... I dont know if any of you have ran into the same issues .. I am listing my issues ...

    1.. Ceating users ... When I go into the DSM G600 HDD i see the folders that I had created .. but when I try to access I am unable to ... Even tho I had created 4 different folders with 4 different usernames and passowrds .. I am able to access only one of the folder ( say X) with the password that I have set ...

    2.. I have 2 laptops both with XP pro ... I can access the folder only through one laptop .. the laptop that I used to configure the NAS .. The other laptop shows me the NAS and all the folder but I cannot access ( even folder X with the same password ) them .. It doesnt accept the password that I use through the other laptop...

    3 .. When I turn the NAS off in the night .. Next time I start the NAS I have to set the whole thing up with the ethernet cable ... I lose the wireless connectivity ...

    4 .. Before I updated the firmware I was getting transfer speed of 5 Mbps via ethernet and 2 MBps via wireless .. After firmware update .. it has come down to 2.5 Mbps via ehternet and 0.8-0.9 Mbps via wireless

    If anyone has had similar issues and found solutions to them please advise .. your help will be greatly appreciated ...
  35. I currently have a Netgear MP101 hooked up (wirelessly) to my network, and the DSM-G600 (RevB) hooked up, also wirelessly. When my PC is on, and running the MP101's MediaServer app, streaming audio from the NAS to the MP101 is no problem...the amount of audio data being sent per second is not greater than the max throughput. That being said, when I try to use the uPnP feature of the DSM so I can hook the MP101 directly to it (so I don't need a PC involved), it crashes the uPnP functionality. I can still write files, get files, etc...but the MP101 no longer sees the DSM as a uPnP server. Anyone else run into this issue?
  36. Did you just try mapping it? instead of using UPNP?
  37. Map it how? The MP101 needs some type of uPnP server (service? thingy?) running, I believe; there's no way to point it to a generic network location to read files, unfortunately. Even when I have my PC on, it needs to be running Netgear's Media Server prog in order to read anything.

    The ultimate goal is to have the PC turned off, and the MP101 read directly from the G600.

    I've heard that hacking the G600 is possible (as gleaned from the initial review), but I haven't had any luck de-tarring the firmware. Anyone know if I can download the source from DLink and inject something in there (or better yet, anyone have a hacked firmware? :D)

    Thanks :)
  38. It has a address right? Just map it to that address. i.e.) \\192.168.0.100\(name)
  39. There isn't any way to input an IP address in the MP101; it basically does a scan for what's available, i.e. uPnP devices, AFAIK. If you know any way to point it just to a file location through its interface, let me know. Thanks again :)
  40. Check your router for the hosts list. You should find in there a list of machines that are getting leases. It should tell you there what the lease of the NAS is. Then you can map the network drive like I mentioned before using that address. You will also need the name of the NAS. Probablly MP101 or whatnot. You can check this is you go directly into the NAS by using the address in your browser or may be telnet. I am not sure how the MP101 or the DSM works but this is pretty much the just of it.
  41. Sorry I just looked up the MP101 I thought you were just talking about the NAS in general. I read the info wrong. As far as I can see you will still need a stand alone server to have the MP101 up and running, does it have a RJ45 jack on it? i dont see anyway how you can hook it up strait to the NAS though.
  42. The MP101 can hook up to a uPnP server, of which the DSM-G600 is one. One of the advertising points of the G600 was that you could serve up media without having a PC on.
  43. Does it hook up through USB? is there a web interface for then DSM?
  44. The MP101 can only hook up through RJ45 or wireless, but the only way to set it up is through the remote control and it's display.

    The DSM-G600 can hook up through RJ45 or wireless, and the only way to modify it (aside from soldering a connector onto the board) is through it's web interface.

    To turn on the uPnP aspect of the DSM, you go to the web interface, pick the 'Advanced' menu, click on the 'uPnP' button, and then select a folder on the drive to share.

    After doing that, if you go into the MP101's setup menu (via its display by using the remote) and search for servers, the DSM-G600 will be listed. If you pick that, you can then browse through the folders on the G600. Once you do that, and pick a file to play, it vascillates for a bit, then says "Can't connect to server" or something to that effect. If you try to search for servers again, the DSM won't be listed. You can then go through the DSM's web interface and re-share the folder, and repeat the whole process.

    I'm guessing this is more the DSM-G600's fault, as the MP101 can read other uPnP servers with no problem. I'm running the latest firmware for both (DSM-G600 - 1.0.1, MP101 - 1.3.7).
  45. Ok I know what your problem is. Do you use Windows Defender?? Or Microsoft Antispyware beta? Same program but the latter is the earlier version. It has many issues with blocking apps like this. I used to own a DLink music streamer and it would block it although now that I am typing this im realizing that you are not even using a computer disregard whatever I just typed :wink: ..... there seems to be something blocking it through the DSM. Have you talked to DLink or Netgears support?
  46. I tried DLink's support first; still no response. I called them up, got put on hold and got hung up on. Truly, a pinnacle in Technical Support :)
  47. Figures. I am trying to figure out what it could be. Since you have no server and the NAS is pretty much the server.... may be a read problem??? What attributes do you have applied to the NAS? I know the DNS-120 I have you can set attributes to.
  48. Did you manage to found out from Dlink support ? I have the same problem using a DSM-520 media player that is suppose to work with the DSM-G600 "out-of-the-box" and not even Dlink support could have this information fast. I am now waiting a feedback in 48 hours on how these 2 devices can work together - and it says in the box it works seamlessly :)

    I appreciate if you managed to find more info about DSM-G600 and the Media Server.

    Thks
  49. Hi,

    I am new to the forum, but, I have a similar problem to a few of you.

    I have a DSM-G600 with a 400gb HDD installed, connected via 100mb cable to my Linksys WAS354G router and thence to my PC (running Windows XP Pro) and my DSM-320 media player in the lounge.

    Right, my problem is: the PC can "see" the G600 and it is set up as a newtork drive. The DSM-320 can "see" the PC and can play the media files on it. But, although the 320 can sometimes "see" the G600, it can not find any files on it.

    I have tried contacting D-Link support and I am now waiting for nearly a week.

    I have also tried "seeing" the files as shared by Windows Media Player 11 via the network share and that does not work either.

    Also, I have tried setting the G600 as a wireless access point and looking for the files that way with no luck.

    The G600 is running firmware 1.02eu and there seem to be some problems with it, in as much as, if I select "Advanced" then "UPnP AV" and click in the path field, all i get is a blank page. This happens with anything associated with the path field anywhere in the interface.

    any ideas, anmyone?
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