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Best bang for the buck on buying a high end CPU-Poll

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Last response: in CPUs
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Which company to buy from?

Total: 50 votes

  • Alienware
  • 10 %
  • Dell
  • 8 %
  • WidowPC
  • 0 %
  • ABS
  • 4 %
  • FalconNW
  • 32 %
  • HP
  • 2 %
  • OverdrivePC
  • 0 %
  • Vigor gaming
  • 0 %
  • Gateway
  • 4 %
  • Other
  • 40 %
November 28, 2006 1:33:10 PM

Fellow enthusiasts:

Which web site do you recommend on buying good high end CPU (best quality and value)?

(yes I know best value is BIY - but I"m looking for options due to time)
November 28, 2006 1:38:09 PM

I'd go with Falcon if I didn't have the choice to build my own
November 28, 2006 1:38:55 PM

If you're just buying a CPU I highly recommend NewEgg.com

If you're buying a complete system (Case, mobo, CPU, RAM, etc...) I don't have any experience, I always build my own systems (even if it may be more expensive, I just like it being "mine").
Related resources
November 28, 2006 1:40:26 PM

I normally use new egg and build my own - but due to time limitations - that may not be an option this year.

Just looking for advice on companies who people have bought high end systems from.
November 28, 2006 2:10:40 PM

I'm with Danny. (See siggy) I have bought 2 Alienware laptops and ordered one Alienware desktop. The laptops are/were very good laptops. I was quite happy with them. The first one took almost 6 months to arrive the second one 10 days.
I ordered a desktop the day they released the core2 duo. After 2 months wait and a bunch or very lame excuses, I canceled the order. It seems now that I look back that Alienware has trouble deliviering new lines of computers. If you order a desktop from them now, it will probably ship fairly quickly.
I ordered a similar machine from Facon-NW and it shipped in less than 2 weeks. It performance is great, it came with zero bloatware. They even set up and activated Windows for me. When I turned on the machine, it went straight to the desktop without all that account/computer set-up crap. Then even sent both a restore disk made after they set-up my machine AND a windows xp disk.
It did cost me more than the alienware, but for delivery, time, hassle, performance, and service, Falcon beats Alienware hands down.

I personally don't care for Gateway, but that's based on experances that happened years ago.

Dell I don't care for either for similar reasons, plus they were having trouble shipping their new XPS line. I would make sure they got that under control before considering one.

The others I have no experiance with.
November 28, 2006 2:45:42 PM

I like cyberpowerinc myself. I've ordered about 5 systems from them over the years and all of them came fairly fast and have had zero problems with any of them. Just my two copper though
November 28, 2006 2:51:08 PM

If you don't have time to build then get Falcon Northwest.
November 28, 2006 2:53:27 PM

Meh, I like ABS... had their laptop, and it works great. I also think they're priced way better than Falcon...

Edit: Check [H]ardConsumer over at [H]ardOCP, they do a lot of reviews on systems. www.hardocp.com
a c 99 à CPUs
November 28, 2006 3:42:49 PM

It's already been said, but I think this bears repeating:

The best best bang for your buck in buying a cheap, low-end computer is to buy from an OEM. They get large volume discounts, which we DIYers don't. The OEMs will also often will put out a loss-leader low-end machine (the $300 machine) to entice people to buy a computer from them, then sell them an upgraded model or an extended warranty that they DO make money on. Another reason that OEMs can offer cheaper machines than a DIYer can build is that the quality of the parts in some of the real cheap OEM machines is far less than that of any parts you'd find to put in a DIY machine. And add to that if you are a Windows user that you need to buy (I know, you can get an illegal copy, but you shouldn't) a copy of Windows for your machine. Big PC OEMs get copies that cost them about $30 for XP Home and ~$90 for XP Pro so that they don't get tempted to not install Windows on every computer that ships. You won't find a non-educational copy of XP Home for your own use for less than about $80 and XP Pro for $120-130 or so. And the "real" versions of XP are $200 and $300, respectively.

The best bang for your buck in buying a high-end machine is to build your own as the OEMs make most of their margin on upgrades to the base system configuration. Not to mention that you can pick exactly what you want in the machine, which usually is a more major consideration with a high-end machine than an "I just need a computer" budget box.

The midrange area is where it gets to be a toss-up. Your $800-1000 midrange DIY box will be about the same performance as the $800-1000 OEM box. Yours should be better quality, but the OEM box might be marginally cheaper. If you want certain components in it, then you need to build. If you want to OC, you have to build your own. If you want it all set up for you, then go OEM. I built one of these class of machines and was very happy with it. I could have gotten a slightly better deal on an OEM box if I had looked hard for "that special deal." But my box is a good, high-quality unit and I know exactly what's in it and what can go in it.

And as far as a recommendation, I have only ever dealt with one OEM high-ish-end desktop, so I can't really say much. Now laptops I can tell you all about as I've seen lots of big-dollar OEM laptops, but it seems that all of the OEM desktops are all budget/midrange machines and that the gamers who get the high-end ones tend to go to a local mom 'n pop to do it if they don't do it themselves. My university has a lot of Dell OptiPlex desktops and the regular mid-tower ones seem to be decent machines while the small-form-factor ones make nice foot heaters in the winter. My old roommate had a Cyberpower desktop and it seemed decent, but that was a while ago (it was an expensive P4 3.0C and a NVIDIA FX5700 machine if that's an indication. I told him to go ATi 9k, but nooo...)
a c 99 à CPUs
November 28, 2006 3:43:18 PM

It's already been said, but I think this bears repeating:

The best best bang for your buck in buying a cheap, low-end computer is to buy from an OEM. They get large volume discounts, which we DIYers don't. The OEMs will also often will put out a loss-leader low-end machine (the $300 machine) to entice people to buy a computer from them, then sell them an upgraded model or an extended warranty that they DO make money on. Another reason that OEMs can offer cheaper machines than a DIYer can build is that the quality of the parts in some of the real cheap OEM machines is far less than that of any parts you'd find to put in a DIY machine. And add to that if you are a Windows user that you need to buy (I know, you can get an illegal copy, but you shouldn't) a copy of Windows for your machine. Big PC OEMs get copies that cost them about $30 for XP Home and ~$90 for XP Pro so that they don't get tempted to not install Windows on every computer that ships. You won't find a non-educational copy of XP Home for your own use for less than about $80 and XP Pro for $120-130 or so. And the "real" versions of XP are $200 and $300, respectively.

The best bang for your buck in buying a high-end machine is to build your own as the OEMs make most of their margin on upgrades to the base system configuration. Not to mention that you can pick exactly what you want in the machine, which usually is a more major consideration with a high-end machine than an "I just need a computer" budget box.

The midrange area is where it gets to be a toss-up. Your $800-1000 midrange DIY box will be about the same performance as the $800-1000 OEM box. Yours should be better quality, but the OEM box might be marginally cheaper. If you want certain components in it, then you need to build. If you want to OC, you have to build your own. If you want it all set up for you, then go OEM. I built one of these class of machines and was very happy with it. I could have gotten a slightly better deal on an OEM box if I had looked hard for "that special deal." But my box is a good, high-quality unit and I know exactly what's in it and what can go in it.

And as far as a recommendation, I have only ever dealt with one OEM high-ish-end desktop, so I can't really say much. Now laptops I can tell you all about as I've seen lots of big-dollar OEM laptops, but it seems that all of the OEM desktops are all budget/midrange machines and that the gamers who get the high-end ones tend to go to a local mom 'n pop to do it if they don't do it themselves. My university has a lot of Dell OptiPlex desktops and the regular mid-tower ones seem to be decent machines while the small-form-factor ones make nice foot heaters in the winter. My old roommate had a Cyberpower desktop and it seemed decent, but that was a while ago (it was an expensive P4 3.0C and a NVIDIA FX5700 machine if that's an indication. I told him to go ATi 9k, but nooo...)
November 28, 2006 4:38:04 PM

I'm in the "other" catagory. I'd pick Cyberpower. I had to buy one last winter and my experience has been that it was a lot of computer for the money spent and the time that I needed help for a problem, the company helped without complaint.
November 28, 2006 5:05:32 PM

Quote:
It's already been said, but I think this bears repeating:


You can say that again!
November 28, 2006 6:09:45 PM

Quote:
It's already been said, but I think this bears repeating:


You can say that again!

He did! :lol: 
November 28, 2006 6:14:21 PM

Falcon. Hands down, probably the best. Alienware and Gateway have had a lot of bugs with their systems. The XPS 700 from Dell offers very little for upgrades since they use BTX, and there are bug an performance issues with their rigs. I have had any experience with Voodoo. If you're going to be paying a premium for anything, especially this stuff, look to the guys at Falcon first.
They probably have the best customer service in the industry also.
November 29, 2006 12:05:47 PM

Thanks everyone for their thoughts!

S.
November 29, 2006 1:15:10 PM

Just because I'm nit picky somtimes..

Dell = Alienware (Dell bought out Alienware several months back)
HP = Voodoo PC (I think, I heard HP planned on buying them)

But in all honesty I've never ordered a high end pre-built system. However, a friend of mine ordered his XPS from Dell, I was impressed with it. But, I think that Northwest Falcon would suit my needs. They have a lot of customization options when ordering a PC. That's just my 2 cents.
!