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Help In Choosing OS

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November 28, 2006 2:56:20 PM

Like many others on this forum I am a noob to computer building and, of course, have questions. My computer is not yet built and is, if fact, enroute from NewEgg. My question however, has to do with the OS. As a preface I should state that this computer will be used primarily for gaming. My original plan was to wait for Vista to be released. However, after reading about driver problems, and other and various opinions on this forum, I am not sure if that is the best decision. In short, my question is - should I forgo Vista and install XP Pro and let microsoft work out the bugs before installing Vista?

More about : choosing

November 28, 2006 3:08:39 PM

yeah, give vista some time, wait until the first service pack is out. It'll be alot more stable by then.
November 28, 2006 4:00:06 PM

You pretty much hit the nail on the head, PEH. Like any good wine, vista will only get better with time (at least that is the hope :wink: ), so wait a while before you decide to install it.
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November 28, 2006 4:23:07 PM

In short, my answer is - yes.
November 28, 2006 4:53:59 PM

Quote:
In short, my question is - should I forgo Vista and install XP Pro and let microsoft work out the bugs before installing Vista?

Why XP Pro and not just XP Home??

Is this a Vista upgrade coupon concern or some other reason??

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
November 28, 2006 4:58:47 PM

Pretty much what the others said. I plan to migrate to Vista sometime in the spring, after it has been out a few months and the initial patches are out to swat the bugs.

Other than XP Pro, you might consider XP 64 Pro. Since its also a 64 bit OS, you can be loading the computer with various 64 bit programs, drivers, etc before making the switch. And who knows, someone may figure out how to port DX10 into it and you could have a 64 bit OS without having to pay the Vista premium. Just a thought, may not work.
November 28, 2006 5:06:30 PM

Quote:
ye, just go for xp although like others have said, why pro? not wanting to sound patronising but i hope it aint because you think dual cores won't work on it. remember, it is only for mulitple sockets that you need pro, not multiple cores.


Why pro? For me its because I serve drive shares off the computers on my home network and I don't want to share "My Documents" - rather real drive shares.
November 28, 2006 5:29:54 PM

Quote:
and you name is peh how. I WAS NOT ASKING FOR OPINIONS ON PRO AS HAS BEEN DISCUSSED IN COUNTLESS THREADS AND ARTICLES OVER THE YEARS, I WAS ASKING THE OP FOR HIS REASONS AND HIS REASONS ALONE IF THAT WAS NOT OBVIOUS.


Oh, get over yourself, already.
November 28, 2006 5:47:25 PM

Actually I was considering Pro over Home because of the dual core issue. Thanks for setting me straight on that one. Since the concensus appears to weigh in favor of waiting on Vista I have another question related to OS installation. The mobo I will be using is the ASUS P5N32-E-SLI (680i) which is suppossed to natively support SATA. I will be using a Segate 320 Gb SATA HDD. When I install XP Home will I have to load drivers doing the F6 routine or will it install without having to go through that step?
November 28, 2006 6:01:29 PM

You may consider a real OS: Linux.
- can be upgraded at will, without even need to reload as long as you don't upgrade the kernel
- provides a real 3D desktop, even on entry level versions
- uses your hardware efficiently (it includes very efficient caching, making hybrid drives redundant and useless; 3D desktops run on hardware of shader 1.1 class)
- comes with many apps already installed (productivity, multimedia, programming, gaming...)
- older apps run without problems - at most requiring a recompile
- it is already rock stable
- does away with virii and spywares
- costs very little (down to nothing if you're the do-it-yourself type)
- you can use it whatever way you want.

Please note:
- Upgrading from XP to Vista almost always require a full reinstall
- entry level versions don't come with a 3D desktop
- you need hybrid drives, gigabytes of RAM, a multiple gigahertz CPU and recent graphics hardware to ake it run satisfactorially
- you get a poor text editor and a media player at most; anything else must be bought.
- Vista will need at least a service pack to be considered mostly stable
- it's not really out yet, and virii and rootkits already plague it
- cost starts at a hundred bucks for crippled versions
- if you run it on another machine than the one you bought it for (even if that machine went up in flames) you have to buy it again; if you own a piece of hardware without a driver for Vista, this piece of hardware is lost - end of story.
November 28, 2006 6:11:26 PM

Here's a better idea: Dual boot :-D

Put your favorite version of Linux, BSD or whatever on one partition and XP on another for games.

http://lunapark6.com/?p=2454



Hey Linux can look good too ;-)


Regarding Vista I would say wait for as long as possible because vista will make your shinny new PC run like a 386SX-25 @ 16MHz

All joking aside, Vista is a major resource hog and you will need a lot of power to run it!

Live long and prosper! :-D
November 28, 2006 6:13:24 PM

Mitch074 beat me to it while I was typing :-D

A very eloquent post I must say :-D
November 28, 2006 6:32:11 PM

Yep, just get XP Pro w/SP2 and upgrade to Vista next year after any unseen bugs are worked out..
November 28, 2006 7:06:56 PM

Quote:
When I install XP Home will I have to load drivers doing the F6 routine or will it install without having to go through that step?

I believe the important factor here is to have SP2. I'm not sure, but I believe the SATA driver support in pre-SP XP was either missing or suffered from delusions of adequacy. With SP2 a Windows installation should recognize a (non-RAIDed) SATA port without any need to provide a SCSI driver via F6 at the beginning of the install.

But of course the easiest and best way to check this out is to simply do the install. If your SATA drive is recognized, then you've got proof it works. If not, you go back and reconsider the driver thing, no?

(BTW, if your Windows install CD does NOT include SP2 that can be fixed. Google for instructions on creating a new bootable Windows install CD that streamlines/includes SP2).

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
November 28, 2006 7:41:18 PM

Yes, if you feel like shelling out 99 bucks for an OS that is 5 years old and obsolete, so that you need to pay 100 more bucks for something hardly better (and which will, in fact, turn your brand new PC into a laggard), well, do so.

What I find funny is how people say Linux is hard to install and use, when to install WinXP you need:
- to spend a long time in a DOS window to integrate the SP2 in a boot CD,
- to extract a CD boot sector,
- to re-build a CD image manually,
- to edit a text configuration file,
- to extract files in a hardly documented directory structure (because otherwise you need a floppy drive) in order to support your new disk drive,
- to partition your hard disk with a non-explicit, text-mode utility which is unable to recognise drives over 128 Gb,
- the install itself takes at least 45 minutes,
- you need to reboot it at least twice on install (count an extra reboot for any piece of hardware you have which is less than 2 years old),
- and ONLY then can you install your applications.

Nice.
November 28, 2006 7:50:46 PM

i love linux, but linux doesnt love games. and several oc-ing utilitys.
November 28, 2006 8:17:22 PM

PRAAV - People's Republican Army Against Vista.

They just want to gouge us again. No real games for Vista, no real improvements (at least not yet). I mean, how much in the real world with Vista increase performance. We should all be patient. Wait until its out, prices come down, its stable, and their are apps and games out that take advantage of its capabilities. DONT BUY INTO THE HYPE (DX10 and 8800GTX being a great example).

Where is Chrysis? Oh there you are, in Q3 of '07. Geeeeeeeez.
November 28, 2006 8:25:15 PM

Quote:
When I install XP Home will I have to load drivers doing the F6 routine or will it install without having to go through that step?


I cannot speak for XP home but pro SP1 will install on a SATA only system without the need to go anywhere near the f6 key, strue honest dude, I've done it twice
November 28, 2006 8:28:48 PM

I am more than happy with my XP Home setup. I will wait a good deal of time before I take the Vista plunge in lew of DX10.

Its just the tech in me.. having to deal with Windows products all day with servers and laptops etc etc.. I am a bit timid to try the new new NEW!
November 28, 2006 8:28:52 PM

true: to be fair, XP needs a driver only when the boot disk is installed on a RAID volume; it can access single SATA drives in IDE compatibility mode.
November 28, 2006 8:49:37 PM

Indeed my friend I just wished to dispell any myths that you need a driver on a floppy *...shudders...* to be able to install XP, why people keep asking this is beyond me that others recommend that this is what is required beggars belief so I just like to stick a hand up now and then to remind the masses that things have moved on a bit.
November 29, 2006 12:21:00 AM

Quote:
Here's a better idea: Dual boot :-D

Put your favorite version of Linux, BSD or whatever on one partition and XP on another for games.

http://lunapark6.com/?p=2454



Hey Linux can look good too ;-)


Regarding Vista I would say wait for as long as possible because vista will make your shinny new PC run like a 386SX-25 @ 16MHz

All joking aside, Vista is a major resource hog and you will need a lot of power to run it!

Live long and prosper! :-D


I was trying so very hard to avoid recommending Linux to PEH since he is completely new to the computer building scene (and therefore probably wants a dedicated game machine), but seeing as how my good buddy Linux_0 has decided to make his recommendation I would like to completely retract what I said earlier about vista and recommend that you use linux if you want a cool and secure operating system FOR FREE and stick to winXP if you want your games (or dual boot). I wasn't too sure whether or not my fellow linux enthusiasts would come out to play on this thread, which was why i didn't say anything about it earlier ;D. Anyways, I hope I haven't done too much damage to my reputation, haha.

-Zorak
November 29, 2006 12:46:38 AM

I had to use the Floppy from my GA-K8NS Ultra 939 when I was installing XP PRO SP1 on my Sata/150 74g raptor. I think your pretty game saying that XP install definetely doesn't need a floppy for sata drives right after saying 'trust me, i've done it twice'
November 29, 2006 6:28:51 AM

umm it doesnt.. worked fine on my P5N32.... however I did need a floppy for my raid, but NOT the SATA Controllers.
November 29, 2006 6:34:17 AM

Abit AN8-32X with 5 SATA HDD's and 1 SATA DVD\RW and no floppy or IDE drives at all, and yet XP Pro SP1 is on the machine mate.
November 29, 2006 8:38:34 AM

for the time being keep it simple go home (windows) but make sure you get an upgrade coupon allowing you get vista for cheap at some point in the next 6-12 months
November 29, 2006 9:03:45 AM

Quote:

Please note:
- Upgrading from XP to Vista almost always require a full reinstall
- entry level versions don't come with a 3D desktop
- you need hybrid drives, gigabytes of RAM, a multiple gigahertz CPU and recent graphics hardware to ake it run satisfactorially
- you get a poor text editor and a media player at most; anything else must be bought.
- Vista will need at least a service pack to be considered mostly stable
- it's not really out yet, and virii and rootkits already plague it
- cost starts at a hundred bucks for crippled versions
- if you run it on another machine than the one you bought it for (even if that machine went up in flames) you have to buy it again; if you own a piece of hardware without a driver for Vista, this piece of hardware is lost - end of story.


- umm yeah whats the issue there?
- if you want the 3d desktop then dont get the entry level pick the version you want and go with it
- dont know what you mean by hybrid drives but is he not building a gaming machine therefore performance isnt going to be an issue
- so what do you get extra on linux? open office, VLC, AVG what do you get for free that you cant on windows?
- yeah probably ill give you that one
- i wouldnt say plague it i havnt heard any huge rants about unworkable systems etc last i heard there where a hundred or so. which doesnt seem that bad to me as every cracker under the sun worth his salt is trying to break through M$ new software
- crippled umm they still work dont they. what would you prefer they only release one version with all the bells and whistles so that home users have to pay premium prices
- yeah now this is where i totally agree with you i think its disgusting the way that both me and my bro had to buy XP when we built our systems surely if we are both in the same house (behind the same External IP) we should be able to use just one copy if he moved out then fair enough he would have to get his own version

now whilst i agree with you on some points i feel that many of the others are just anti microsoft rants but at the end of the day the guy who started this thread just asked for a little help in choosing an OS for gaming and realistically there can be only one and for now that is windows xp
he already declared that he is a noob so i feel that whilst your opinion is partly valid has no place in this thread and may only lead to confusion on PEH's part
November 29, 2006 2:55:18 PM

it's BECAUSE he's a noob that he must be informed early on that Windows isn't the only OS out there.

A home version of Vista with a 3D interface is 260 bucks - it's 220 too much compared with a supported, 3D desktop enabled Linux distro, and 180 too much compared to the premium version of Linspire (which can run many Windows apps out of the box)
Basically when you upgrade a Linux distribution, you can keep your home partition; your settings and documents will not suffer from the upgrade. With Windows you need to back them up (good luck finding back all your DRM keys, Outlook address book and mesage archives, IE Favourites and cookies...)
hybrid drives are required due to the poor memory manager used by XP/Vista; due to Linux's way of caching data, disk access is reduced to a minimum (without even mentioning file fragmentation, which is almost inexistant in Linux)
Free apps usually run faster and more reliably on Linux than Windows - OOo starts in under a few seconds on 'nux, while it takes several more seconds on Windows, for example, and Firefox experiences far less memory leaks (if at all) on 'nux.
that's the point: you pay for something that actually does LESS than free stuff.
about your licences: Apple sells MacOS a hundred bucks a licence, but home use for up to 5 is 200 - making it very interesting once you have more than 2 computers (and MacOS X 10.5 will actually come with 3D desktop) . Of course MS won't do that.

Being a noob is no excuse for not learning there is something better than Windows.
November 29, 2006 5:10:59 PM

Quote:
My computer is not yet built and is, in fact, en route from NewEgg.

PEH, if you're still out there I was wondering if you'd post some info about what is in the system you've ordered.

You say it's already en route. Did it arrive yet? If so, how's the build ... the OS install in particular ... going?

A somewhat slow, but inquiring mind would like to know. :) 

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
November 29, 2006 8:46:48 PM

Quote:
Abit AN8-32X with 5 SATA HDD's and 1 SATA DVD\RW and no floppy or IDE drives at all, and yet XP Pro SP1 is on the machine mate.


I'm just sayin that mine did, you can argue with that all you want but I'm the one that had to find the damn floppy and stick it in. Just because two of your boards didn't need the drivers doesn't mean that every mobo out there won't need drivers. Not attacking you just saying you can't make huge generalisations based on such a small test field.
December 1, 2006 3:40:35 PM

PEH, if you're still out there I was wondering if you'd post some info about what is in the system you've ordered.

You say it's already en route. Did it arrive yet? If so, how's the build ... the OS install in particular ... going?

A somewhat slow, but inquiring mind would like to know. :) 

I really appreciate all of the advice regarding the OS for this new build. Based on the advice received I have elected to install XP Home once this system is up and running. Which brings me to your question. I did not reply earlier because I spent yesterday putting this thing together, and of course there are problems. Therefore, since I need additional advice I need to provide the component breakdown. It is as follows:

Mobo-Asus P5N32-E_SLI
Video- EVGA 8800GTS
CPU- e6600
HSF- Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 Pro
Memory- Corsair 1Gx2 Twin2x2048-6400C4D
PSU- Corsair 620HX
HDD- Seagate 320Gb 7200.10 (SATA)
DVD R/W-LG GSA H10
Case- Lian Li PC 777A

All was installed yesterday. Today, when powering up to view POST, my monitor remained black. On power up all fans are running, the HDD light briefly, the DVD has power because the drawer will open. No beep codes at all. The monitor is connected using the DVI to VGA dongle. The monitor does work in other modes but does not indicate a signal. Any help getting past this first hurdle would be appreciated.
December 1, 2006 4:14:36 PM

Quote:
PRAAV - People's Republican Army Against Vista.

They just want to gouge us again. No real games for Vista, no real improvements (at least not yet). I mean, how much in the real world with Vista increase performance. We should all be patient. Wait until its out, prices come down, its stable, and their are apps and games out that take advantage of its capabilities. DONT BUY INTO THE HYPE (DX10 and 8800GTX being a great example).

Where is Chrysis? Oh there you are, in Q3 of '07. Geeeeeeeez.


Great post....but we all know as keyboard hounds that patience can be difficult at times! :wink:
December 1, 2006 4:17:37 PM

Quote:
for the time being keep it simple go home (windows) but make sure you get an upgrade coupon allowing you get vista for cheap at some point in the next 6-12 months


Agreed. I screwed up and bought Home last mo w/o upgrade coupon...duhhhhhhhh! :oops: 
December 1, 2006 4:23:23 PM

Quote:
As a preface I should state that this computer will be used primarily for gaming.


You should buy a playstaion3 or Xbox360 than.... Windows is more trouble than it is worth, when it comes to games....
December 1, 2006 4:31:20 PM

Quote:

You should buy a playstaion3 or Xbox360 than.... Windows is more trouble than it is worth, when it comes to games....



And thousands for computer upgrades rather than having the "prepped" meal already to go...I sometimes wonder myself!
December 1, 2006 4:32:50 PM

Quote:
All was installed yesterday. Today, when powering up to view POST, my monitor remained black. On power up all fans are running, the HDD light briefly, the DVD has power because the drawer will open. No beep codes at all. The monitor is connected using the DVI to VGA dongle.

Strange.

Could you post some info about your monitor? I didn't see it in your component list.

Just to sanity check, the video card is plugged into one of the two blue x16 lane PCI Express slots, correct?

Have you tried plugging the cable into both of the connectors on your EVGA 8800? If that doesn't work, try using the other DVI-to-VGA adapter. (The adapter is not a likely source of the problem, but since the EVGA 8800 comes with two, might as well try both "just in case").

Probably not relevant, but perhaps your monitor defaults to DVI mode? When I connected my monitor via DVI there was no signal because it defaults out of the box to VGA mode. I had to press a "source" button on the monitor (and not labeled, of course) to switch it to DVI mode. Maybe yours does the opposite?

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
December 1, 2006 4:56:06 PM

Peh, To add to what zjohnr said, after you verify your monitor is ok, start removing components one at a time and try to boot. I've had this problem caused by 4 things on different systems. One was the video card was DOA out of the box, the next was a bad ram chip, but that had a post beep, another was power supply 12volt line went bad, and the last was CPU was not seated correctly. I don't remember if the cpu problem gave apost beep or not. Look around the forums for this probelm, it is pretty common on new builds. Also verify your jumper settings and all the prebuild stuff. The other place I would check is the motherboard mfg website under suppport and knowledge base. I've gotten pretty good with computers after 15 years of breaking them and having to figure out what the hell I just did. Have fun troubleshooting. Keep us updated.

PS - All you windows haters (not to take anything from Linux-good stuff) Vista of course has driver issues...it's NOT available for retail sale yet. There will be tons of drivers out in the next 2 months. A month and a half till vista comes out and then about 2 more weeks. Manufacturers will release drivers for their newest gear first and then trickle down to their old stuff. I've been running vista since beta, then Pre-rc1, then rc1 and so on until rc2. I like the changes they are making. I am running it on a p4 3.0ghz with 1Gb ram and a 60gb hdd. The video card is a radeon 9550 and I have everything on vista maxed out, 3d desktop and all and it does ok, only a little shutter lag. I would wait on switching to linux until you had a little more experience building systems. Linux is great that it's cheap, but tends (not always) to not be as user friendly.
December 1, 2006 4:57:47 PM

I have actually now tried two displays. The first was a Samsung 171MP Monitor which I switched to PC as the input. The second was a LCD TV with DVI inputs. It was connected to that, DVI selected as the input - nothing but a blue screen. The 8800 was inserted in the topmost PCI-e 16x slot. I am a total loss here. Is there anyway to determine what might be causing the lack of video. Before I inserted the 8800 I did a power up and received 1 long beep - 3 short and after several seconds another single beep. After everthing was connected no beeps at all.
December 1, 2006 5:03:46 PM

you may need to buy a regular PCI card for the OS install then put the drivers for the 8800 in and pop in the card.

The 1950XTX cards had this problem because their BIOS are too new.. or something obscure.
December 1, 2006 5:17:56 PM

Check with your motherboard manufacturer to see if there may be a flash for your bios to support the 8800. I had to do this for my x850 when I built my xp system using an older motherboard. Other than that the other suggestions are all good ones. Keep plugging. I also looked at your PSU and video card. The PSU has 3 12v rails. Each gives 18a of power. The 8800 requires a minumum of 26 amps. So, make sure your video cord power is connected to 2 different 12v lines.
December 1, 2006 5:37:04 PM

Buying XP at this point should get you a free upgrade voucher to Vista... best of both worlds (as far as gaming goes)

Minus the gaming I think people here might be inclined to recommend Linux... as-is, that's just not gonna cut it for most gamers.
December 1, 2006 5:42:52 PM

Quote:
Yes, if you feel like shelling out 99 bucks for an OS that is 5 years old and obsolete, so that you need to pay 100 more bucks for something hardly better (and which will, in fact, turn your brand new PC into a laggard), well, do so.

What I find funny is how people say Linux is hard to install and use, when to install WinXP you need:
- to spend a long time in a DOS window to integrate the SP2 in a boot CD,
- to extract a CD boot sector,
- to re-build a CD image manually,
- to edit a text configuration file,
- to extract files in a hardly documented directory structure (because otherwise you need a floppy drive) in order to support your new disk drive,
- to partition your hard disk with a non-explicit, text-mode utility which is unable to recognise drives over 128 Gb,
- the install itself takes at least 45 minutes,
- you need to reboot it at least twice on install (count an extra reboot for any piece of hardware you have which is less than 2 years old),
- and ONLY then can you install your applications.

Nice.


What are you smoking! I know no one who goes through all that crap to install Windows.

...but since you are so blind to your idiocy you wouldn't know that.

FYI:

The 128GB LBA extension limitation can be easily removed with a utility from any HD manufacturer. I think it may take a whole 10 seconds to fix.

The last time I knew anyone who tried to install any Linux variation (myself included), they had to go through hell and back to get even the basic drivers to work (let alone wireless or laptop drivers!!) My friend who last attempted an install got it to work only after spending 6+ hours on installing hardware drivers ALONE! And talk about working manually! 90% of the drivers have to be extracted and installed via command line! Thank god for EXE's. :idea:

A full Windows install + drivers + patches (including latest SP) might take as much as 2 hours. I can't say the same for any kind if Linux! :lol: 
December 1, 2006 6:03:36 PM

Quote:
Is there anyway to determine what might be causing the lack of video.

The only method I know of is trial-and-error ... but I'd love it if someone would describe another way. Some things you don't particularly want to be right about ... :( 

If you can either borrow a known working PCIe card from a friend or perhaps test your 8800 in a friend's PCIe system this would help narrow down whether the cause of the problem is the video card or somewhere else on the motherboard.

IMO, it's extremely unlikely that your Asus 680i motherboard and EVGA 8800GS are somehow incompatible, since they were released almost at the same time. But it is not so unlikely that it can be completely ruled out. Just not the first place I'd look. A possible good question to ask tech support though. You might start with be EVGA tech support since right now the most obvious possible point of failure might be their video card.

Again, another sanity check question. Have all the power connectors been hooked up? There are a bunch to consider. Besides the basic 24 pin connector for the motherboard there is also a 4 pin CPU power connector and a 6 pin PCIe power connector on your video card.

The 4 pin CPU power connector is on an edge of the board near the CPU socket. Look for it in the upper right hand corner of this newegg picture. Also check to see what your motherboard manual says about this connector.

The 6 pin PCIe power connector is on the back end of the EVGA 8800GTS. Here's another newegg picture for reference.

Your CORSAIR HX620w PSU comes with the matching modular connector for each of these. If one of them is not hooked up, it could be causing your problem.

-john
December 1, 2006 6:06:38 PM

strange - my last Linux install, on a X2 3800+ and a Geforce 6600 took... 15 minutes (all apps installed too, not the OS alone) including proprietary Nvidia graphics driver (nice package) and updates (merely having to restart the graphical interface) - without ever opening a terminal window.

There is, indeed, a way to remaster a Windows boot/install drive: nLite.
- you need a working Windows machine
- you need to download and install .Net
- the install, even with all of XP's crap disabled, still takes half an hour (before updates, before drivers, before apps)
- you always need to reboot

Now boyo, I have built and installed computers from all PC generations (starting with real-mode 8088), and I've had to deal with every and all Windows versions from 2 to Vista.
If I tell you that right now, Linux systems are much more plug and play than Windows, you're going to scoff at me. An since you haven't even tried it yourself, you may please refrain from spouting off senseless speech. Suffice to say that I have a digital cmera, a webcam and a few other odd pieces of hardware around. In Windows, most (if not all) ask me for a driver, but don't tell me for what model of hardware I need it. In Linux, I plugged them; in under a few seconds, they were detected, installed, configured, their apps loaded and I could use them. No reboot.
Linux systems DON'T follow Windows model: installing drivers using the command line is good for the do-it-yourselfer - it's equivalent to unzipping Windoows drivers, deleting the .inf file and copying the driver files where they belong then register them in the registry (some hardcore Windows users actually do that).
You have nice little things in Linux called packages (RPM or deb mainly) that can do the same - with a single click, the hardware is recognised, the application that depends on it installed and configured, and everything Just Works (tm).
You'll tell me that some hardware doesn't work under Linux. Let me tell you this: it may work one day. On the other hand, if Vista doesn't know it when it's out, it'll never run it.
December 1, 2006 6:16:14 PM

Your experiences have prompted a question - which version/type/flavor of Linux do you use?

There are millions out there and some are clearly superior to others, but all the ones I have run across (to date) have been, simply put, a PITA to install and use.
December 1, 2006 6:16:29 PM

Quote:
Peh, To add to what zjohnr said, after you verify your monitor is ok, start removing components one at a time and try to boot. I've had this problem caused by 4 things on different systems. One was the video card was DOA out of the box, the next was a bad ram chip, but that had a post beep, another was power supply 12volt line went bad, and the last was CPU was not seated correctly. I don't remember if the cpu problem gave apost beep or not. Look around the forums for this probelm, it is pretty common on new builds. Also verify your jumper settings and all the prebuild stuff. The other place I would check is the motherboard mfg website under suppport and knowledge base. I've gotten pretty good with computers after 15 years of breaking them and having to figure out what the hell I just did. Have fun troubleshooting. Keep us updated.

As indicated before I have verified that both display devices are working. I have removed everything but the cpu and memory. On power up I received 1 long beep and three short. As I understand it that indicated that the cpu and memory are OK but there is no video card, which would be true since I removed it.

I then reinstalled only the video card using the power adapter cable running it to a different line. Still no video on either display. I then reconnected everything again. No beeps and no video.
December 1, 2006 6:26:17 PM

I use Mandriva 2007 free - with easyurpmi configured (it has a nice website which allows configuring packages not included in the free version), but I would recomment noobs to part with the 40 bucks the Discovery version costs (comes with CDs/DVD, phone support and all).

I also tried Ubuntu, but I didn't like the way it allowed such easy access to root account.

OpenSuSE is nice too, but package sources are not maintained as well as Mandriva's.

Debian is intermediate to advanced only - don't start with it (but keep an eye on it).

Slackware is server guru only.

Knoppix is an excellent Live distribution to test your hardware with - if it works under Knoppix, it will work on any other distro (I'm talking about wi-fi adapters here, essentially).
December 1, 2006 6:28:34 PM

Well, if all the appropriate power connectors are hooked and unless someone else comes up with another suggestion, then if you haven't already I'd say it's time to consider calling/IMing/emailing EVGA tech support. :(  If/when you do, have your card's serial number handy.

-john
December 1, 2006 7:17:34 PM

I've read that the 8800 needs at least a 400w psu, I know you have a 620 so that should not be the problem. BUT, your PSU has 3 12v lines that give 18a each. The 8800 needs like 26 amps. The question is, do you have the PCIe connector going to one cable point or two. On my modualr PSU, the PCIe connector can plug into two connectors if I need more amps. Other than that, have fun on hold with EVGA, figures it's Friday huh. I'd be crying in my milk over the weekend. Hope this helps. I may be totally off base about this, but it's a possibility.
!