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sharing internet connection ??

Last response: in Networking
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September 23, 2003 1:35:38 PM

i have 2 pc's both with win XP.i have cablenet.i wanted to share the internet connection
so tht i can use internet on both pc's using the existing connection.
is there any way to do it WITHOUT using a router ?
i have heard tht i can put 2 lan cards on 1 of my pc's and share the connection
i don't know exactly how to do it. what ip's to assign?
can someone explain me in detail how to do this if it is possible.
do i need to cross crimp the cable running frm 1 pc to another or connect it in normal way.
September 25, 2003 7:45:25 PM

Install 2 lan cards in main computer, install 1 lan card in other computer and connect them with a crossover cable, not a regular rj45 cable. Run setup wizard on the main computer and make a disk. Then run the disk on the other computer to setup the network. The ips will be assiged automatically. That should do it I think.
September 27, 2003 2:45:47 PM

I have 2 PC's sharing 1 ISDN connection. I have 1 NIC in each machine connected together using a crossover cable. I run a program call AnalogX, this is a proxy server and this works well.
Hope this helps
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September 29, 2003 4:18:03 AM

what is a crossover cable?
is it the same as cross crimped cat 5 cable...
October 2, 2003 7:21:30 PM

No, a crossover cable and Cat5 cable are different. The crossover cable has the Tx and Rx lines reversed on each end

Rx---- ----Rx
\/
Tx----/\----Tx

whereas a standard Cat5 cable, they are the same

Rx----------Rx
Tx----------Tx

If you plan on using ICS, you have to use a crossover, otherwise the computers won't be able to see each other.

Hope this explains it. :smile:

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October 3, 2003 9:17:40 PM

Hold on a minute SPARKY, you really should know something about the subject BEFORE posting any advice.
CAT 5 doesn't mean ANYTHING except that it is 4 wires comprising 2 x 24 awg twisted pairs. It is really just 2 Plain Old Telephone System (POTS) patch cords.
A crossover cable means that the receive on end A is wired to the send on end B, and the send on end A is wired to the receive on end B. Ethernet over twisted pair just happens to use CAT 5 wire to do this.
Sparky says that both ends are reversed, if you do that then you end up with a straight through cable in which the send on end A is connected to send on end B and the same with the receive.
Remember for a x'over cable just reverse ONE end, and CAT 5 DOESN'T mean the cable is straight thru or x'over it's just a cable.
Now my advice here is to go buy the cheapest router you can find and use that, FORGET about using Internet Connection Sharing or Proxy server or any other gadget, use a router.
Many routers that have a multiport switch or hub now have the ability to automatically detect whether a x'over or straight thru connection is required. This means that you can use ANY cable that is handy whether it is straight or x'over.
In the average home situation you will see absolutely NO difference in the performance of a switch versus a hub.
Send me an e-mail for an explaination.
October 4, 2003 5:44:13 AM

First of all, CAT 5 is not just 2 telephone lines put together. There are specifications that make it a paticular type of cableing with a certain number of twists per foot. But to the meat-If you can't afford a router... check and see if you can have multiple ip addresses connected to your ISDN connection. If the ISDN connection is to an external box and the connected computer connects to it with a patch (cat5) cord then you can just buy a used 10/100 hub and connect the ISDN connection, and both the PCs to the hub.

Will work IT for food. Seriously.
October 5, 2003 3:01:55 AM

You obviously have No experience in this area. 2 Pots patch cords work just as well as CAT 5, the purpose of the twists is mechanical not electrical, in a multi wire bundle the 2 wires of a pair can get separated, the twists simply help them to stay together. Preventing the pairs from separating and lying next to a wire of a DIFFERENT pair reduces the chance of crosstalk. If you use 2 sparate POTS cords then by definition each pair can NEVER lie close to another pair.
In any case I did not expect anyone to assume that I literally meant that CAT 5 WAS the exact equivalent of 2 POTS patch cords, I was merely using this as an illustration, for heavens sake.
I worked for Bridge Communications and 3COM back in the 80's when hardly anyone could even spell Ethernet. I installed the first 3COM prototyp 10BaseT at Motorola in Schaumburg in 1987/88.
What to do mean "can't afford a router" you can buy them for $20, which is at least as cheap as 2 Ethernet cards and the associated cords and a hell of a lot more efficient.
October 5, 2003 3:07:04 AM

I should also add that the wire pairs in genuine POTS patch cords are also TWISTED.
If you don't know what you are talking about keep quiet and stop causing confusion.
October 10, 2003 8:23:43 PM

Sturm's solution is pretty much on. Check out practicallynetworked.com for more information.
!