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too many watts to handle?

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December 3, 2006 11:18:22 AM

here is my question:

i am planning on purchasing a new computer very soon, have been looking at all the new parts that are coming out and such and have decided on a e6600 and a 8800 computer. my question is, i currently have a computer with a 420watt psu and i was wondering if moving to a 600+watt psu will be too much for my electricity to handle. i do not want to buy a new computer only to be blowing breakers all the time. how can i find out if my apartment can handle such a high wattage psu/computer?

More about : watts handle

a c 83 ) Power supply
December 3, 2006 1:57:59 PM

as said above....

Most house breakers and wiring are rated @ 15 amps

600 watts @ 120(us/can) volts is about 5 amps

Now take in to consideration that the PSU is not 100% efficient

so lets say it's 75% efficient.....then it would take about 750 watts(please correct me if my math sucks)

So to play it safe lets say it takes 800 watts to make it nice and even

you are looking @ 6 amps

With your wiring rated @ 15 amps you can plug 2 of those bad boys in and still have power to spare

Even at that it is doubtful you computer will ever pull that much....so you are good to go

Hope this helps.....
December 10, 2006 7:49:11 PM

Hehe poor americans.....

We run 13A @ 240V, enough for 3120W, on all domestic circuits.

We shall be running Octo 8900GTX SLI while you just sit there tripping breakers :p 

Being an electronics technician I'm kinda frightened of 110V circuits anyway. While 240V will throw you across the room, leaving you dazed and bruised (trust me I have had it happen to me!), 110V is about right to make you hold on and die :/ 

But anyway, think of those people running PC P&C 1.1kW PSUs, they can do it without tripping breakers so us mortals with 600W PSUs should be fine :) 
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December 10, 2006 8:29:22 PM

Quote:
While 240V will throw you across the room, leaving you dazed and bruised (trust me I have had it happen to me!), 110V is about right to make you hold on and die :/ 


24,000V is always nice when working around a power line 8O Talk about taking a flying leap.
December 10, 2006 8:47:35 PM

I remodeled my computer room and the electrical is wired with 10 gauge wire so I have it on a 30amp breaker. I have had 4 computers 3 lcd 1crt printer, cable modem, router, and light and the total amperage used (atleast what the clip on ampmeter says) was 17 amps. Normal usage is minus 2 computers and 1crt and lcd. That reading was 8 amps. I overkilled my room a little :lol: 
December 10, 2006 9:09:11 PM

I'm running an APC which will also report total load. Although my system is relatively low power (CPU is rated at 110W thermal), I'm also running 3 hard drives plus a DVD burner. The max I've seen the power supply report is 230 watts (running prime95) and it normally pulls around 210 watts - and that's with the, monitor, speakers, cable modem, and router all plugged into it. Depending on how much power your video card draws, and the efficiency of your power supply, that you should give you some sort of idea of the total power you'll draw.
December 10, 2006 9:45:42 PM

I run close to a thousand amps on my TIG.

I had to rewire my house bout eight times.

When I use my PC all the lights in my house go dim and start to flicker

My cables are all water cooled otherwise they melt.
December 10, 2006 9:46:19 PM

Quote:
110V is about right to make you hold on and die :/ 


Clearly, you don't know much about electricity.

US power does NOT make you "hang on and die" because it is 60Hz.

Our muscles operate at 50Hz. So, it is countires like mine (New Zealand) which has 240V and 50Hz which are (potentially) very dangerous. At 50Hz, getting zapped clamps your muscles tight. whereas at 60Hz you can let go.

This is why you NEVER test for live-ness with an open hand. You always test with the back of your hand, so if it is live, you pull away...

However, this is utterly immaterial, as RCDs or Residual Current Devices in a home make it impossible to shock yourself. You can grab as many live wires as you like, and your RCD trips before even half a sine-wave passes through the device.
December 10, 2006 11:14:45 PM

Quote:
110V is about right to make you hold on and die :/ 


Clearly, you don't know much about electricity.

US power does NOT make you "hang on and die" because it is 60Hz.

Our muscles operate at 50Hz. So, it is countires like mine (New Zealand) which has 240V and 50Hz which are (potentially) very dangerous. At 50Hz, getting zapped clamps your muscles tight. whereas at 60Hz you can let go.

This is why you NEVER test for live-ness with an open hand. You always test with the back of your hand, so if it is live, you pull away...

Meh, I have never lived and worked in the US or on any US electrical systems, the only 110V supplies I have encountered are stepped down from 240V and still 50Hz. My knowledge of the bodies muscle system is apparently lacking of course :) 

It was just an off the cuff remark meant in jest anyway, nvm
December 12, 2006 12:39:11 PM

To keep things in perspective, 600W is 6 100 watt bulbs. Do you think your apartment can handle 6 more lightbulbs? If not, take it up with your landlord b/c something needs to change.
December 12, 2006 1:46:29 PM

For each circuit, calculate how many amps you are using. For example 600W/120V or 600W/240V. Consider adding a 20 Amp circuit or larger if there is not enough room on the circuits. There is a limit on the main circuit breaker, for example 150 Amps. It can be exceeded, I'm not sure by how much exactly, I think you can exceed it up to 10%, because you will not be turning on everything in your house at the same time.
If you want to add a circuit yourself, wire it outside inside a plastic/metal pipe or behind the walls inside. Match the wire size to the amperage of the circuit.
December 12, 2006 2:17:42 PM

Quote:
here is my question:

i am planning on purchasing a new computer very soon, have been looking at all the new parts that are coming out and such and have decided on a e6600 and a 8800 computer. my question is, i currently have a computer with a 420watt psu and i was wondering if moving to a 600+watt psu will be too much for my electricity to handle. i do not want to buy a new computer only to be blowing breakers all the time. how can i find out if my apartment can handle such a high wattage psu/computer?


find a power strip.
find 6 lamps.
plug lamps into power strip
put 100w light bulbs into lamps
turn on bulbs.

600w = 6 100w lightbulbs.

aint no big deal
December 12, 2006 2:38:34 PM

Quote:

This is why you NEVER test for live-ness with an open hand. You always test with the back of your hand, so if it is live, you pull away...



I dont know how you test for liveness there overseas, but most people in civilized countries would agree to never touch a wire that could be live with your bare hand.

Where did you find this "muscles work at 50Hz" stuff? Cant find anything about it online and the only conclusion i could draw from what i found is that it doesnt matter (which is the only intuitive one also).

Wikipedia says:
A low-voltage (110 to 220 V), 50 or 60-Hz AC current travelling through the chest for a fraction of a second may induce ventricular fibrillation at currents as low as 60mA.

And that the damage made to other muscles is by heat (burns).

You can also easly find information that DC current causes a lock-up of the muscles so that you cant let go of the conductor.
Any AC current "shakes" muscles insted of locking them up.

Anyways it might be true that the 240V shock makes the reaction quicker, but the higher current might cause greater damage per unit of time.
Its probably a tie.
December 12, 2006 9:45:14 PM

Our sockets are only rated at 13A, although the ring main they are connected on is on an RCD rated at 30/32A....
December 12, 2006 10:01:57 PM

Ive seen antech neo 480s run 7900GT SLI with an oced 805... Stable...

You will be suprised.... just give it a go and see.... if it cant handle it get a new one.
December 12, 2006 10:11:56 PM

No. The power supply doesn't output more watts. It just has more available if needed. What you really need with a power supply is a good reserve of power. You need it to be able to deliver whatever is needed by the CPU, hard drive, and so on... and keep the heat down.
Quality is more important than total output. You want the power output to be steady in any load. You do not want the power to dip or brown out when there is a big demand.
If you are a gamer with a high speed system with a top end video card, you will need the best high output system.
Still, for most computers a high quality, well-engineered power supply, such as PC Power and Cooling, will do a much better job at 400 or 450 watts than a poorly designed 600 or 800 watt machine. The components that enable it to recover are the difference. You want a great design with superb electronic components.
You also want a great low noise fan. After steady output, the noise factor is the greatest pain.
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