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Newb at new HDs

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December 4, 2006 2:45:47 AM

Alright, I'm building a new monster PC which I will post later to ask for your help/opinion.

Right now I'm in my HD phase and Ive been doing a lot of reading.

My First plan:

Buy a 74 Gb raptor 10krpm etc etc and use its speed etc for the OS (alone, possibly most if not all appz)
2 Seagate for games
320 Gb - games/anime
320 - Appz and Movies

After reading, I found that theres an even better way

2nd Plan

Raptor - os and appz
Raid the the two Seagate for games/movies
Seriously I'm a little confuse as to what set up I should do that would be the most efficient.

I'll have a WD raptor 74 GB and 2 Seagate 320 what could I do with this?

Would the loading, on the WD Raptor efficiency lessen if I used it for:

OS and certain specific "games". I sorta want to use the RAPTOR'S capability on certain games since its faster and would love to feel the boot-timeless speed, but I don't want to harm the bootup/efficiency of the system. If I am to go with this, is it worth getting the 150 GB raptor instead of the 74 gb?

Thanks for yoru info guys check back later

Leon

More about : newb hds

December 4, 2006 3:30:55 AM

I recommend going with the 150gb raptor, as you should put your games on it. The OS will also boot from this drive, but it is fine, as when you need to reinstall the OS, you have to reinstall your games as well. With the 150, you'll have the space for all your games, even the ones that will take tens of gigabytes in the near future (its gonna happen).

As far as the 320's are concerned, I don't recommend going RAID with them. The way it seems, you are going to be using these drives as storage drives, and when you are intending on doing that, it is best to not mess with raid, as performance will not matter and you're gonna want more data integrity than you will performance. No need to JBOD them either, just set them up as two separate drives and partition them as you like.

That, of course is my opinion. That is also what I would do if I were in your shoes, and is also what I did with my similar, yet much less flashy situation about a year ago. Good luck.
December 4, 2006 3:43:18 AM

From what I see you would be spending around 330 dollars on the three hard drives.
Ive read that the 150gb raptor is FASTER than two 7200rpm drives in RAID0.
If I were you I would get a 150gb raptor or two. If two put them in RAID 0.
The 74gb raptor was 55 dollars less last time that I checked, but if you are going to go as far as to buy a raptor you might as well go for the real thing.

You might have an issue with amount of free bays in your system so I would suggest going with a 500gb hitachi drive or just 1 320gb. Dual 150gbs in RAID 0 is nearly as fast as it gets (aside from 3 drive raid 0 and 15k scsi.)
For your storage drives I would definately not go for RAID0 as Vicente Fox said. I would even suggest RAID1 which backs up automatically what is on the other hard drive.

The more hard drives you add the more heat and noise you create and the more power you consume. Also if you rely on fewer drives the chance of failure and data loss is less. That is why perhaps you shouldnt go with RAID0 at all, for when you do that your chances for drive failure and data loss are twofold.
If oyu do make sure to back up. (Ive got 6 external HDs all from WD: 2 500gbs, 2 320gbs 2 80gbs) Back up or you will LOSE IT ALL!!!
Related resources
December 4, 2006 3:55:56 AM

Quote:

For your storage drives I would definately not go for RAID0 as Vicente Fox said.


lol, never been called the President of Mexico before, gracias senor.
December 4, 2006 1:01:25 PM

I got 7 external drives, 5 Seagate, 1 WD, and 1 Maxtor...
Internal I got a bit more, but too lazy to go into that either...

Meh, I find back-ups marginally useful, I've had 2 HDD's die on me, and I was able to retrieve most of my data off of them easily with external enclosures and GetDataBack... at most back-up important documents i.e. tax records, work and such, but everything else would most likely be a waste of space.

Drive wise... depends on if you really care about performance or you really care about storage... I like storage and price per gig more important, so I would neve touch a raptor, but if you want speed and only speed, get two raptors in raid 0 and you're fairly set. But they're loud, hot, and noisy, so quick word of warning. Keep them properly cooled and they shouldn't die on you, at least not for a long time.
December 4, 2006 8:56:20 PM

I think the probability of physical drive failure is so small that there is no real harm in RAID0. If you're going to lose data chances are that it's for another reason.
December 4, 2006 9:18:16 PM

Quote:
I think the probability of physical drive failure is so small that there is no real harm in RAID0. If you're going to lose data chances are that it's for another reason.


Thats exactly right. Often its the file system. Fat32 has been the culprit in my case. I don't know how it did it, but after a few months of having a 136gb partition in fat32 (linux/windows compatibility), i had 40% fragmentation, and when I ran chkdsk 3 times it fixed errors every time, and apparently there were hundreds of "lost" files. Many were icons and others were the music that I keep on there. I dislike fat32. Fortunately, everyone uses NTFS and noone has to deal with that sort of problem as much anymore.
December 6, 2006 7:39:36 PM

Hey guys thanks for so much response. I have another Question if you all dont mind.

Im trying to give my old computer enough juice so I can pass it down.

This computer is a

Intel Pentium IIIE, 1000 Mhs

Mobo - Tyan Tomcat I815T

Right now my major concern is to upgrade it slightly. It has heart :D  So I dont really dispose it, would be a DAMN waste.

After doing some research I think the maximum RAM it can handle is a 512 MB

It's a 168-pin PC133. I found two good ones, and one was even recommended by the manufacturers website

What I was aiming was this

Kingston KVR133X64C3 which has three capacities.

128/256/512

Would buying a 128 and a 256 added it to my existing 128 (different brand probably) work? Or should I just get two 256?

Another question is regarding the harddrive. currently I have a very SLOW Maxtor 33073H4/28GB @ 5400 rpm.. uber slow.

My Mobo I think accepts ATA-100 HDs.

I found a good one for a cheap price - Western Digital Caviar SE WD1600JB 160GB 7200 RPM 8MB Cache IDE Ultra ATA100 Hard Drive

I was wondering if that HD would work on my system. I mean I know my system is OLD but Im definitely sure its not ancient yet.
December 6, 2006 9:25:49 PM

About the ram, if you can find it for cheap, get as much as the system can handle. Mismatched ram will work, but buying two 256's would possibly be nearly the same price as one of each, and then you'd have two brand new modules of ram working together finely. I recommend going with modules from this list:

http://www.tyan.com/support/html/memory_s2080.html

About the hard disk, the system will handle it, make sure its the PATA version of the hard drive rather than the SATA. Seems a bit overkill as far as capacity goes for such an old system, but depending on the usage model of it now, it could fit perfectly. Just remember to set the jumpers on the back correctly, as chances are it doesn't accept cable select very well.

It's been a while since I've seen 6 PCI slots all together...
December 6, 2006 10:14:25 PM

Quote:
I got 7 external drives, 5 Seagate, 1 WD, and 1 Maxtor...
Internal I got a bit more, but too lazy to go into that either...

Meh, I find back-ups marginally useful, I've had 2 HDD's die on me, and I was able to retrieve most of my data off of them easily with external enclosures and GetDataBack... at most back-up important documents i.e. tax records, work and such, but everything else would most likely be a waste of space.

Drive wise... depends on if you really care about performance or you really care about storage... I like storage and price per gig more important, so I would neve touch a raptor, but if you want speed and only speed, get two raptors in raid 0 and you're fairly set. But they're loud, hot, and noisy, so quick word of warning. Keep them properly cooled and they shouldn't die on you, at least not for a long time.


man you're like the storage king =/ 1.8 TB of stuff
(aside from servers)
December 6, 2006 10:22:51 PM

Quote:
I think the probability of physical drive failure is so small that there is no real harm in RAID0. If you're going to lose data chances are that it's for another reason.


In the time I've had PCs, hard disks have died on me more often than anything else. If a HD dies you *may* lose your data.

As others have said, RAID 1 protects against physical drive failure to a large degree, but does not protect against other ways of losing data (e.g. accidentally deleting it).

It depends how much you care about your data - if you really don't want to lose it, you must back it up. If it doesn't matter so much, don't bother.
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