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Amd 65 nm CPU's launched

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December 5, 2006 3:34:24 AM

I'm was very confused, these posts are popping up all over the web right now, yet no one has the press release cited, or where they got he information. If anyone can please find the AMD released notes about this, that would be a big help.
http://www.eetimes.com/news/latest/showArticle.jhtml?ar...
Notice when this was posted. (12/05/2006 12:01 AM EST)
Right when 12:00 came along! and here:
http://www.tgdaily.com/2006/12/05/amd_intros_65nm_cpus/
Posted : December 5, 2006 00:03
Right after Midnight! I see everyone saying it, but no one is citing any source. So where is a source? Could everyone just have posted based on speculation?

EDIT *
*Looked On the amd website...*
www.amd.com

More about : amd cpu launched

December 5, 2006 3:41:51 AM

Bah... all 65nm is going to do is increase capacity for AMD. Don't expect any performance gains or anything else useful. Overclockability may be better though...
December 5, 2006 3:44:43 AM

Quote:
Bah... all 65nm is going to do is increase capacity for AMD. Don't expect any performance gains or anything else useful. Overclockability may be better though...


Thanks... -_- because I didn't understand that(sarcasm).
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December 5, 2006 5:36:51 AM

Where can I buy one?
December 5, 2006 5:41:05 AM

yeah, ive been waiting for the new amd's so i can order my new computer
December 5, 2006 5:49:02 AM

In fact, I am a little bit disappointed with the transition.

AMD should transit all the x2's production to 65nm fabrication process now.
December 5, 2006 6:03:29 AM

Power, my friend.
And cost.
December 5, 2006 10:23:26 AM

PAPER LAUNCH ALERT
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=5222

Quote:
While AMD has announced its Brisbane core 65nm processors, the processors only available in limited quantities. Expect mass availability in Q1’2007.

PAPER LAUNCH ALERT
December 5, 2006 10:40:41 AM

Quote:
PAPER LAUNCH ALERT
http://www.dailytech.com/article.aspx?newsid=5222

While AMD has announced its Brisbane core 65nm processors, the processors only available in limited quantities. Expect mass availability in Q1’2007.

PAPER LAUNCH ALERT

And AMD fanboys have the nerve to call the Core 2 launch a "paper" launch.
December 5, 2006 11:17:52 AM

According to AMD, the new chips will draw 30% less power than the 90nm parts. That is a huge advantage.

Quote:
AMD chips made on the 65-nanometer process will consume about 30 percent less energy than the same chips produced on the 90-nanometer process when running at the same speed. In the first chips shipped on this process, virtually all of the benefit comes in reduced power consumption, said Nick Kepler, vice president of logic technology development at AMD.

LINK (via c|net)

We will find out soon enough if this is true.
December 5, 2006 11:41:32 AM

Quote:
It looks like to me that the Inq cannot do math, because 12x of 183 is roughly 0.7 (or 70%), 0.7 is a natural scaling factor to go 65 nm but the die size should be 90 mm^2 + change for a 65 nm straight up shrink....

We shall see. The Inq article is less enthusiastic and more skeptical than I expected. It's also unsigned. Apparently Mr. Valich no longer has ownership of the story after his recent screw-up. :) 
December 5, 2006 12:29:21 PM

Meh... Inquirer...

AMD is just trying to get people to pay attention to it again especially with their spectacular failure of a 4x4 launch... well, not really failure, but there was little to no enthusiasm at all. They're just saying one thing after another hoping that something will whip the mass into a frenzy, and the Barcelona news was somewhat succesful...

This however, is expected, and kinda boring... we know they were planning to go 65nm, and the day doesn't really matter that much since it still probably won't make up for the performance difference with the C2D.

Still waiting for more quad-core news...
December 5, 2006 12:45:17 PM

The usual PR trick of releasing a product before it´s finished to keep the consumer from buying the competitors products. Nice.
December 5, 2006 12:53:35 PM

The thing is, most consumers don't keep up with tech news at all, or only the mainstream versions, so I'm not too certain what this "release" is supposed to do... Consumers and Servers is where the money is, and consumers just buy from Tier 1 integrators so this "release" is useless for them, and servers have their own contracts with same Tier 1 integrators, so yet again, this "release" has no bearing...

Hmmmmm, then again, I'm not a marketing major.
December 5, 2006 1:34:51 PM

try not to be a fanboy yourself and turn this thread into a flame war.

wes
December 5, 2006 1:39:03 PM

Well, might be useless for end user, but might be that we won't see them, rather they are shipping all available to box makers.... and such. But who knows.

wes
December 5, 2006 1:47:09 PM

Meh, I would think they would at least have some for review sites at least, they can't be leaving the enthusiast market totally out in the cold...
December 5, 2006 1:49:23 PM

Quote:
Meh, I would think they would at least have some for review sites at least, they can't be leaving the enthusiast market totally out in the cold...


I guess the rules have changed for AMD these days. Maybe it's hard for them to adjust to playing 2nd fiddle, like too much ego damage or something like that.
December 5, 2006 1:55:05 PM

I understand your point, but, we are a small market in comparison to the companies like Dell and HP. I am sure that since AMD just aquired them, they want to keep them as happy as possible. The reason I think this, is because we are a small market, and Dell is advertising for them, while paying to use there CPU's. I have seen more AMD ads on TV since Dell, thn I have probably ever seen in the past. It just makes sense to send the cpu's out to those who are paying the bills, then we get to have them. As much I have want to play with one myself, I can't blame them for possibly doing what I think they are. Also, didn't Intel do this, to a lesser extent with Core 2? Thought I remember people talking about buying low end Dell's and such, so they could get there hands on one.

wes
December 5, 2006 2:07:01 PM

Quote:
Bah... all 65nm is going to do is increase capacity for AMD. Don't expect any performance gains or anything else useful. Overclockability may be better though...


I think they'll get a little headroom for higher clock speeds, but I but they're binning the hell out of them and perhaps saving the better ones for the next model number.

So sad to see my Socket 939 slowly disappearing from retail!
December 5, 2006 2:10:51 PM

If these chips are any good at overclocking I think AMD would have at lest sent some to a few review sites. It seems the e-SiGe process slowed them down too much and now they have to use a more simple one. 90nm is still the better process. I know Anandtech reported that the first 65nm FX will be K8L.
December 5, 2006 2:28:36 PM

Hmmm.. AMD is already having a shortage of proc's now that I think about it, so I wouldn't be surprised if a large number of these were going to the system integrators... but I can't see these same integrators specifically asking for the 65nm chips, since they're bound to cost a bit more than the older ones since AMD would most likely want to get rid of it's stock on hand... meh...

We just might see a bump in speed across the board with a bit lower TDP, but again, nothing drastic or earthshattering.
December 5, 2006 2:34:03 PM

Other than original cost, wouldnt' they cost less for AMD to produce? Therefore, possibly costing less for the box makers, or costing the same with AMD making a larger profit? All speculation, I am just throwing this out for comments, not making any claims....

wes
December 5, 2006 2:34:34 PM

Quote:
The thing is, most consumers don't keep up with tech news at all, or only the mainstream versions, so I'm not too certain what this "release" is supposed to do... Consumers and Servers is where the money is, and consumers just buy from Tier 1 integrators so this "release" is useless for them, and servers have their own contracts with same Tier 1 integrators, so yet again, this "release" has no bearing...

Hmmmmm, then again, I'm not a marketing major.


You are assuming AMD is only fishing for the biggest groups. As you mentioned, servers won´t be affected since companies that build them are pretty good informed on what´s happening on the market. The second group are OEM system builders that get their dirty little fingers on the new hardware anyway and that are probably bound by contracts with the manufacturer to boot.

I assume AMD is a) fishing for people like us, that know what they buy and b) looking to get some positive PR going.
While enthusiasts and gamers might not be the biggest target group, they are still paying customers and they are the high profile group. If only a few hundred gamers decide to wait for a 65nm AMD Processor, the whole paper launch was worth it.
December 5, 2006 3:21:31 PM

They'll all be in the OEM supply chain for a few weeks. Like someone mentioned, Dell and HP get priority over the retail guys. Makes perfect sense, too.

They cost less for AMD to produce, but they also have loans to pay off. They won't decrease the price right away. When they're selling tons of these things to big companies and to people wanting to put together low-heat/noise media center PCs, they don't really need to knock down the price.

These things supposedly also absolutely sip energy when idle, somewhere between 7 and 8 watts. Pretty impressive, I guess.

If the energy, thermal, and overclocking prove to be at least decent in this generation of chips, that bodes very well for Kuma and Barcelona.
December 5, 2006 6:03:14 PM

Wasn't AMD the one that used to be so proud of its hard launches?
December 5, 2006 6:05:49 PM

Didn't you know? AMD and Intel swapped places... :D 
December 5, 2006 6:35:32 PM

Quote:
I assume AMD is a) fishing for people like us, that know what they buy and b) looking to get some positive PR going.
While enthusiasts and gamers might not be the biggest target group, they are still paying customers and they are the high profile group. If only a few hundred gamers decide to wait for a 65nm AMD Processor, the whole paper launch was worth it.


If you are a gamer or any other power user, then these chips definitely aren't for you. They are strictly for low priced desktops. Thats why most are going to OEMs. Expect to see the 65nm AMD chips in HP machines in Bestbuy, Walmart and the like. There the greater yields (because of smaller die size) will help AMD meet the pricepoint needed to compete with Intel. These chips are NOT for people who build their own systems nor gamers. They can't compete on performance and their price in small lots are not competitive (though HP and Dell probably get quite a good deal).
December 5, 2006 6:37:31 PM

What about the overclockers?
December 5, 2006 6:42:16 PM

Quote:
What about the overclockers?
C2
December 5, 2006 6:44:17 PM

C2, pssh... we already know how far it will go. I'd still want to play around with a 65nm AMD64 just to see how far it would go.
December 5, 2006 6:46:54 PM

Quote:
What about the overclockers?

In theory, if you shrink the transistor size, you should be able to raise the clock. It is a surprise for me, that they didn't raise the clock speeds with at least 400MHz, when they introduced the 65nm process. Maybe, the architecture is holding them back or there are some other problems with the process. Or maybe it is marketing - what HP and Dell want urgently are cheap chips to undercut their Core2 offerings, and they are not interested in chips occuping the same price point as the cheaper Core2's while performing almost the same. If that is the case, they should be wonderful for overclockers, but we need to wait for independent benchmarking.
December 5, 2006 6:49:45 PM

Quote:
Maybe, the architecture is holding them back or there are some other problems with the process.

Bingo.

AMD 65nm is VERY immature right now. It'd be interesting to see how much better AMD 65nm is at the end of its lifespan.
December 5, 2006 7:11:53 PM

Quote:

If you are a gamer or any other power user, then these chips definitely aren't for you. They are strictly for low priced desktops. Thats why most are going to OEMs. Expect to see the 65nm AMD chips in HP machines in Bestbuy, Walmart and the like. There the greater yields (because of smaller die size) will help AMD meet the pricepoint needed to compete with Intel. These chips are NOT for people who build their own systems nor gamers. They can't compete on performance and their price in small lots are not competitive (though HP and Dell probably get quite a good deal).


You may be right. That would make the announcement just a regular press reslease. Difficult to believe but plausible.
December 5, 2006 7:17:56 PM

Like I say... AMD is screwing the enthusiast market right now and concentrating on where the money is... Server and consumers...
December 5, 2006 8:03:29 PM

Quote:
Maybe, the architecture is holding them back or there are some other problems with the process.

Bingo.

AMD 65nm is VERY immature right now. It'd be interesting to see how much better AMD 65nm is at the end of its lifespan.

No company EVER launches it's high end on it's new process for a number of possible reasons(this is spoken through history, not my opinion).
First off they don't want to ruin the old process that is already being used, 90nm in this case, if they completely switch over to the high and and work there way down for 65 nm then they will have extreme trouble getting rid of the 90 nm(and considering they are still producing 90nm while they sell 65 nm).
And bugs, bugs, bugs, there may be some bugs that aren't quite worked out in the first generation that need to be changed before the chips move soundly into the high end.
December 5, 2006 9:44:15 PM

Really. What products did INtel introduce at launchof 65 nano. Their high end desktop and Core Duos for the notebook. Both were imediately shipped at launch and were imediately their high end products in those spaces.
Typically the cannibalization of older products is less of an issue because the products launched on the new process are usually the new high end. The other products continue to sell at lower price points until your entire manufacturing has been converted. This has to a first in which new generation manufacturing does not create a higher end product.
In response to "currently immature process", I thought Amd would only switch when 65 nano was mature. Also why does it appear that AMD does not get a 50% shrink from this new manufacturing. Not only is late, not really here but not really 65 nano either.
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