"Knowledge Management Policy"

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

To: Microsoft Corporation
From: Undersigned
Subject: Knowledge Management Policy

Dear Sirs:

Executive Brief: Author and implement a comprehensive knowledge management
policy.

Symptoms:
1. Current search engines require scanning of very large resources to find
very small resources.
2. Default directory names in Windows Operating Systems as My Documents, My
pictures are machine related, rather than informational.

Treatment: Adopt a knowledge management policy that is logical and
intelligent, and apply it all products, services, systems, and data,
especially to personal computer operating systems and storage solutions .

Result: KM policy will be implemented by user (machine and human) methods.

Meaning: A user will see information organized in a logical hierarchical
system.

Interpretation: If you want to adopt a strategy of separating applications
from data, then do it, but do it in an intelligent manner. Both the methods
of storage and the content must be logically organized. A user should know
that on any system, whether it be a document system, a storage system, or an
operating system, that a piece of information concerning an atom will be
found in a subtopic of molecule in an applied knowledge management
hierarchy.

Application: Naming storage drives a: b: c: is intelligent only if the
knowledge management system hierarchical object is naturally alphabetic. In
the application/data scenerio, why not name drives: Applications: Data:, or
better, suggest a naming strategy from Library Science such as, Humanities,
Physical Science, and Social Science? People are involved with Taxonomy, and
Microsoft should lead the charge, because it is developing the tools that
make people smarter.

Human knowledge can be logically organized. Digital systems must find and
apply algorithms that translate information into something logical,
meaningful, and useful. This incorporates the idea that the solutions
Microsoft provides should, by definition, consider and implement a baseline
knowledge management architecture that can categorize sensory or mechanical
analogs. A knowledge management policy provides the wheels for intelligent
systems.

--
Dennis D.,
http://www.dennisys.com/
18 answers Last reply
More about knowledge management policy
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    How to Contact the Microsoft Wish Program
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;114491

    Microsoft Product Enhancement Suggestions
    http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp?from=cu&fu=%2Fisapi%2Fgomscom%2Easp%3Ftarget%3D%2Fmswish%2Fthanks%2Ehtm

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User

    Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "Dennis D." wrote:

    | To: Microsoft Corporation
    | From: Undersigned
    | Subject: Knowledge Management Policy
    |
    | Dear Sirs:
    |
    | Executive Brief: Author and implement a comprehensive knowledge management
    | policy.
    |
    | Symptoms:
    | 1. Current search engines require scanning of very large resources to find
    | very small resources.
    | 2. Default directory names in Windows Operating Systems as My Documents, My
    | pictures are machine related, rather than informational.
    |
    | Treatment: Adopt a knowledge management policy that is logical and
    | intelligent, and apply it all products, services, systems, and data,
    | especially to personal computer operating systems and storage solutions .
    |
    | Result: KM policy will be implemented by user (machine and human) methods.
    |
    | Meaning: A user will see information organized in a logical hierarchical
    | system.
    |
    | Interpretation: If you want to adopt a strategy of separating applications
    | from data, then do it, but do it in an intelligent manner. Both the methods
    | of storage and the content must be logically organized. A user should know
    | that on any system, whether it be a document system, a storage system, or an
    | operating system, that a piece of information concerning an atom will be
    | found in a subtopic of molecule in an applied knowledge management
    | hierarchy.
    |
    | Application: Naming storage drives a: b: c: is intelligent only if the
    | knowledge management system hierarchical object is naturally alphabetic. In
    | the application/data scenerio, why not name drives: Applications: Data:, or
    | better, suggest a naming strategy from Library Science such as, Humanities,
    | Physical Science, and Social Science? People are involved with Taxonomy, and
    | Microsoft should lead the charge, because it is developing the tools that
    | make people smarter.
    |
    | Human knowledge can be logically organized. Digital systems must find and
    | apply algorithms that translate information into something logical,
    | meaningful, and useful. This incorporates the idea that the solutions
    | Microsoft provides should, by definition, consider and implement a baseline
    | knowledge management architecture that can categorize sensory or mechanical
    | analogs. A knowledge management policy provides the wheels for intelligent
    | systems.
    |
    | --
    | Dennis D.,
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Thanks Carey Frisch:
    This is a recommendation for a corporate policy. I expect someone in Redmond
    will read it, look at their file tree, and figure things could be better.
    Seems that after the invention of newsgroups people chucked aside the idea
    of inventing and maintaining a categorical information architecture for the
    personal computer.

    Dennis D.

    "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
    news:e1Lsmuz8EHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > How to Contact the Microsoft Wish Program
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;114491
    >
    > Microsoft Product Enhancement Suggestions
    > http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp?from=cu&fu=%2Fisapi%2Fgomscom%2Easp%3Ftarget%3D%2Fmswish%2Fthanks%2Ehtm
    >
    > --
    > Carey Frisch
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows XP - Shell/User
    >
    > Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    > http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Dennis D." wrote:
    >
    > | To: Microsoft Corporation
    > | From: Undersigned
    > | Subject: Knowledge Management Policy
    > |
    > | Dear Sirs:
    > |
    > | Executive Brief: Author and implement a comprehensive knowledge
    > management
    > | policy.
    > |
    > | Symptoms:
    > | 1. Current search engines require scanning of very large resources to
    > find
    > | very small resources.
    > | 2. Default directory names in Windows Operating Systems as My Documents,
    > My
    > | pictures are machine related, rather than informational.
    > |
    > | Treatment: Adopt a knowledge management policy that is logical and
    > | intelligent, and apply it all products, services, systems, and data,
    > | especially to personal computer operating systems and storage solutions
    > .
    > |
    > | Result: KM policy will be implemented by user (machine and human)
    > methods.
    > |
    > | Meaning: A user will see information organized in a logical hierarchical
    > | system.
    > |
    > | Interpretation: If you want to adopt a strategy of separating
    > applications
    > | from data, then do it, but do it in an intelligent manner. Both the
    > methods
    > | of storage and the content must be logically organized. A user should
    > know
    > | that on any system, whether it be a document system, a storage system,
    > or an
    > | operating system, that a piece of information concerning an atom will be
    > | found in a subtopic of molecule in an applied knowledge management
    > | hierarchy.
    > |
    > | Application: Naming storage drives a: b: c: is intelligent only if the
    > | knowledge management system hierarchical object is naturally alphabetic.
    > In
    > | the application/data scenerio, why not name drives: Applications: Data:,
    > or
    > | better, suggest a naming strategy from Library Science such as,
    > Humanities,
    > | Physical Science, and Social Science? People are involved with Taxonomy,
    > and
    > | Microsoft should lead the charge, because it is developing the tools
    > that
    > | make people smarter.
    > |
    > | Human knowledge can be logically organized. Digital systems must find
    > and
    > | apply algorithms that translate information into something logical,
    > | meaningful, and useful. This incorporates the idea that the solutions
    > | Microsoft provides should, by definition, consider and implement a
    > baseline
    > | knowledge management architecture that can categorize sensory or
    > mechanical
    > | analogs. A knowledge management policy provides the wheels for
    > intelligent
    > | systems.
    > |
    > | --
    > | Dennis D.,
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone from
    Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.

    --
    Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    http://www.fjsmjs.com
    Protect your PC
    http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx

    "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    news:OLz1D478EHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    > Thanks Carey Frisch:
    > This is a recommendation for a corporate policy. I expect someone in
    > Redmond will read it, look at their file tree, and figure things
    > could be better. Seems that after the invention of newsgroups people
    > chucked aside the idea of inventing and maintaining a categorical
    > information architecture for the personal computer.
    >
    > Dennis D.
    >
    > "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
    > news:e1Lsmuz8EHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >> How to Contact the Microsoft Wish Program
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;114491
    >>
    >> Microsoft Product Enhancement Suggestions
    >> http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp?from=cu&fu=%2Fisapi%2Fgomscom%2Easp%3Ftarget%3D%2Fmswish%2Fthanks%2Ehtm
    >>
    >> --
    >> Carey Frisch
    >> Microsoft MVP
    >> Windows XP - Shell/User
    >>
    >> Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    >> http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Thank you Frank Saunders,
    If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    d.

    "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone from
    > Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.
    >
    > --
    > Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    > Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    > http://www.fjsmjs.com
    > Protect your PC
    > http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >
    > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    > news:OLz1D478EHA.1404@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    >> Thanks Carey Frisch:
    >> This is a recommendation for a corporate policy. I expect someone in
    >> Redmond will read it, look at their file tree, and figure things
    >> could be better. Seems that after the invention of newsgroups people
    >> chucked aside the idea of inventing and maintaining a categorical
    >> information architecture for the personal computer.
    >>
    >> Dennis D.
    >>
    >> "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
    >> news:e1Lsmuz8EHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >>> How to Contact the Microsoft Wish Program
    >>> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;114491
    >>>
    >>> Microsoft Product Enhancement Suggestions
    >>> http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp?from=cu&fu=%2Fisapi%2Fgomscom%2Easp%3Ftarget%3D%2Fmswish%2Fthanks%2Ehtm
    >>>
    >>> --
    >>> Carey Frisch
    >>> Microsoft MVP
    >>> Windows XP - Shell/User
    >>>
    >>> Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    >>> http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >
    >
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Raymond J. Johnson Jr." <RayJay@nospam.org> wrote in message
    news:uoIQkuA9EHA.2112@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl
    >
    > Thanks for confirming my initial impression.

    <G>

    --
    Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    http://www.fjsmjs.com
    Protect your PC
    http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    news:uCFJIDD9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    > Thank you Frank Saunders,
    > If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    > d.
    >
    > "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    > news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >> This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone from
    >> Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.

    So you're just a troll trying to stir up arguments.

    --
    Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    http://www.fjsmjs.com
    Protect your PC
    http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    >So you're just a troll trying to stir up arguments.

    This subject began in an attempt to design config files.

    One of the things Microsoft prides itself in is the number of ways a task
    can be accomplished. This leaves a lot of latitude to the user, but the user
    is often confused by the number of choices, not understanding the
    differences between them. The remedy is to exercise discipline over the
    latitude. One way to achieve that discipline is to organize the subjects
    logically.

    The default naming structure in the file system does not favor logical
    organization. Examples are: Program Files, and My Documents. In either case,
    a search engine is the best remedy to find a utility or document when there
    are literally thousands of choices in a file tree. As we all know, sorting
    alphabetically falls short primarily due to naming of programs and
    documents. Example: I want an antivirus program. It is not named antivirus.
    It is under N for SymaNtec. The firewall not named firewall, it is under Z
    for ZoneAlarm. So goodbye "program files", hello
    science.computer.security.zonealarm.

    As PC storage and networking grow to hold terabytes of data and millions of
    files, it becomes apparent that it would be better if the information was
    organized into traditional knowledge groups, thereby shortening search times
    for the user.

    Another consideration is that with the PC, especially the home PC, there are
    multiple uses for the machine, where in business the software is limited and
    easily configured. I would tend to design for the home PC (network) where
    the most sophisticated projects can live peacefully with the more mundane
    utilities organized by a subject classification system, or more accurately,
    under a knowledge management system. That KM system should be part of the
    system design.

    D.

    "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP IE/OE" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    news:%23VehyjF9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    > news:uCFJIDD9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    >> Thank you Frank Saunders,
    >> If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    >> d.
    >>
    >> "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    >> news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >>> This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone from
    >>> Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.
    >
    > >
    > --
    > Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    > Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    > http://www.fjsmjs.com
    > Protect your PC
    > http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >
    >
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Responses in line...

    "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    news:OhOaSaM9EHA.2900@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    | >So you're just a troll trying to stir up arguments.
    |
    | This subject began in an attempt to design config files.
    |
    | One of the things Microsoft prides itself in is the number of ways a task
    | can be accomplished. This leaves a lot of latitude to the user, but the
    user
    | is often confused by the number of choices, not understanding the
    | differences between them. The remedy is to exercise discipline over the
    | latitude.

    "Discipline the latitude" is Newspeak for "dumb the system down."

    |One way to achieve that discipline is to organize the subjects
    | logically.

    Thus removing the "latitude" for the user to decide what's logical within a
    given context.

    | The default naming structure in the file system does not favor logical
    | organization. Examples are: Program Files, and My Documents. In either
    case,
    | a search engine is the best remedy to find a utility or document when
    there
    | are literally thousands of choices in a file tree. As we all know, sorting
    | alphabetically falls short primarily due to naming of programs and
    | documents. Example: I want an antivirus program. It is not named
    antivirus.
    | It is under N for SymaNtec. The firewall not named firewall, it is under Z
    | for ZoneAlarm. So goodbye "program files", hello
    | science.computer.security.zonealarm.

    Where did "science" come from? What good is "computer"? Isn't it bloody
    obvious? What prevents a user from using his "latitude" to create the
    directory structure you suggest, if that's what works best for him?

    | As PC storage and networking grow to hold terabytes of data and millions
    of
    | files, it becomes apparent that it would be better if the information was
    | organized into traditional knowledge groups, thereby shortening search
    times
    | for the user.

    There's no such thing as a "traditional knowledge group" except in the minds
    of people like you who want to dumb everything down to their own level, and
    to hell with anyone who has the temerity to think for himself.

    | Another consideration is that with the PC, especially the home PC, there
    are
    | multiple uses for the machine, where in business the software is limited
    and
    | easily configured. I would tend to design for the home PC (network) where
    | the most sophisticated projects can live peacefully with the more mundane
    | utilities organized by a subject classification system, or more
    accurately,
    | under a knowledge management system. That KM system should be part of the
    | system design.

    And by making a "knowledge management system" part of the system design,
    what you're proposing is imposing your myopic and intellectually lazy view
    of organization on the world at large. Go ahead and configure your own
    computer to a level of simplicity commensurate with your own intellectual
    deficit, and leave mine alone.


    | D.
    |
    | "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP IE/OE" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    | news:%23VehyjF9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    | > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    | > news:uCFJIDD9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    | >> Thank you Frank Saunders,
    | >> If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    | >> d.
    | >>
    | >> "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    | >> news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    | >>> This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone from
    | >>> Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.
    | >
    | > >
    | > --
    | > Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    | > Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    | > http://www.fjsmjs.com
    | > Protect your PC
    | > http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    | >
    | >
    |
    |
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    The Dewey decimal system in a library does not dumb down the library. It
    makes it more functional.
    Yes it is an imposed strategy, but the application of it is planned and
    dynamic. If you think about it, schools, hospitals, and government offices
    are constituted under some undefined organized naming system. KM gives a
    name to the method of organization, and specifies a plan for implementation.

    That is no where more important than in information processing, especially
    in intelligent systems. Microsoft could, and should, be a leader in the
    field. IBM has already accepted the challenge, and produces product
    specifically to help with KM in the workplace. Neither corporation seems to
    have a KM policy at the corporate level, or at least I have been unable to
    find one, and that is where it should exist.

    Could be that it is a difficult process, a challenge, to create a (any)
    policy with such a broad spectrum, and the idea of creating a somewhat
    restrictive policy on information systems is not in line with things as they
    are now (the status quo). All the more reason to pursue it I say.

    D.

    "Raymond J. Johnson Jr." <RayJay@nospam.org> wrote in message
    news:eN47A6M9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > Responses in line...
    >
    > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    > news:OhOaSaM9EHA.2900@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > | >So you're just a troll trying to stir up arguments.
    > |
    > | This subject began in an attempt to design config files.
    > |
    > | One of the things Microsoft prides itself in is the number of ways a
    > task
    > | can be accomplished. This leaves a lot of latitude to the user, but the
    > user
    > | is often confused by the number of choices, not understanding the
    > | differences between them. The remedy is to exercise discipline over the
    > | latitude.
    >
    > "Discipline the latitude" is Newspeak for "dumb the system down."
    >
    > |One way to achieve that discipline is to organize the subjects
    > | logically.
    >
    > Thus removing the "latitude" for the user to decide what's logical within
    > a
    > given context.
    >
    > | The default naming structure in the file system does not favor logical
    > | organization. Examples are: Program Files, and My Documents. In either
    > case,
    > | a search engine is the best remedy to find a utility or document when
    > there
    > | are literally thousands of choices in a file tree. As we all know,
    > sorting
    > | alphabetically falls short primarily due to naming of programs and
    > | documents. Example: I want an antivirus program. It is not named
    > antivirus.
    > | It is under N for SymaNtec. The firewall not named firewall, it is under
    > Z
    > | for ZoneAlarm. So goodbye "program files", hello
    > | science.computer.security.zonealarm.
    >
    > Where did "science" come from? What good is "computer"? Isn't it bloody
    > obvious? What prevents a user from using his "latitude" to create the
    > directory structure you suggest, if that's what works best for him?
    >
    > | As PC storage and networking grow to hold terabytes of data and millions
    > of
    > | files, it becomes apparent that it would be better if the information
    > was
    > | organized into traditional knowledge groups, thereby shortening search
    > times
    > | for the user.
    >
    > There's no such thing as a "traditional knowledge group" except in the
    > minds
    > of people like you who want to dumb everything down to their own level,
    > and
    > to hell with anyone who has the temerity to think for himself.
    >
    > | Another consideration is that with the PC, especially the home PC, there
    > are
    > | multiple uses for the machine, where in business the software is limited
    > and
    > | easily configured. I would tend to design for the home PC (network)
    > where
    > | the most sophisticated projects can live peacefully with the more
    > mundane
    > | utilities organized by a subject classification system, or more
    > accurately,
    > | under a knowledge management system. That KM system should be part of
    > the
    > | system design.
    >
    > And by making a "knowledge management system" part of the system design,
    > what you're proposing is imposing your myopic and intellectually lazy view
    > of organization on the world at large. Go ahead and configure your own
    > computer to a level of simplicity commensurate with your own intellectual
    > deficit, and leave mine alone.
    >
    >
    > | D.
    > |
    > | "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP IE/OE" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    > | news:%23VehyjF9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > | > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    > | > news:uCFJIDD9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    > | >> Thank you Frank Saunders,
    > | >> If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    > | >> d.
    > | >>
    > | >> "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    > | >> news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > | >>> This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone from
    > | >>> Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.
    > | >
    > | > >
    > | > --
    > | > Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    > | > Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    > | > http://www.fjsmjs.com
    > | > Protect your PC
    > | > http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    > | >
    > | >
    > |
    > |
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    I add that books organize information. What remains is to organize the
    books, and then the libraries.

    D.
    http://www.dennisys.com/

    "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    news:emva7FQ9EHA.1452@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > The Dewey decimal system in a library does not dumb down the library. It
    > makes it more functional.
    > Yes it is an imposed strategy, but the application of it is planned and
    > dynamic. If you think about it, schools, hospitals, and government offices
    > are constituted under some undefined organized naming system. KM gives a
    > name to the method of organization, and specifies a plan for
    > implementation.
    >
    > That is no where more important than in information processing, especially
    > in intelligent systems. Microsoft could, and should, be a leader in the
    > field. IBM has already accepted the challenge, and produces product
    > specifically to help with KM in the workplace. Neither corporation seems
    > to have a KM policy at the corporate level, or at least I have been unable
    > to find one, and that is where it should exist.
    >
    > Could be that it is a difficult process, a challenge, to create a (any)
    > policy with such a broad spectrum, and the idea of creating a somewhat
    > restrictive policy on information systems is not in line with things as
    > they are now (the status quo). All the more reason to pursue it I say.
    >
    > D.
    >
    > "Raymond J. Johnson Jr." <RayJay@nospam.org> wrote in message
    > news:eN47A6M9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >> Responses in line...
    >>
    >> "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >> news:OhOaSaM9EHA.2900@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >> | >So you're just a troll trying to stir up arguments.
    >> |
    >> | This subject began in an attempt to design config files.
    >> |
    >> | One of the things Microsoft prides itself in is the number of ways a
    >> task
    >> | can be accomplished. This leaves a lot of latitude to the user, but the
    >> user
    >> | is often confused by the number of choices, not understanding the
    >> | differences between them. The remedy is to exercise discipline over the
    >> | latitude.
    >>
    >> "Discipline the latitude" is Newspeak for "dumb the system down."
    >>
    >> |One way to achieve that discipline is to organize the subjects
    >> | logically.
    >>
    >> Thus removing the "latitude" for the user to decide what's logical within
    >> a
    >> given context.
    >>
    >> | The default naming structure in the file system does not favor logical
    >> | organization. Examples are: Program Files, and My Documents. In either
    >> case,
    >> | a search engine is the best remedy to find a utility or document when
    >> there
    >> | are literally thousands of choices in a file tree. As we all know,
    >> sorting
    >> | alphabetically falls short primarily due to naming of programs and
    >> | documents. Example: I want an antivirus program. It is not named
    >> antivirus.
    >> | It is under N for SymaNtec. The firewall not named firewall, it is
    >> under Z
    >> | for ZoneAlarm. So goodbye "program files", hello
    >> | science.computer.security.zonealarm.
    >>
    >> Where did "science" come from? What good is "computer"? Isn't it bloody
    >> obvious? What prevents a user from using his "latitude" to create the
    >> directory structure you suggest, if that's what works best for him?
    >>
    >> | As PC storage and networking grow to hold terabytes of data and
    >> millions
    >> of
    >> | files, it becomes apparent that it would be better if the information
    >> was
    >> | organized into traditional knowledge groups, thereby shortening search
    >> times
    >> | for the user.
    >>
    >> There's no such thing as a "traditional knowledge group" except in the
    >> minds
    >> of people like you who want to dumb everything down to their own level,
    >> and
    >> to hell with anyone who has the temerity to think for himself.
    >>
    >> | Another consideration is that with the PC, especially the home PC,
    >> there
    >> are
    >> | multiple uses for the machine, where in business the software is
    >> limited
    >> and
    >> | easily configured. I would tend to design for the home PC (network)
    >> where
    >> | the most sophisticated projects can live peacefully with the more
    >> mundane
    >> | utilities organized by a subject classification system, or more
    >> accurately,
    >> | under a knowledge management system. That KM system should be part of
    >> the
    >> | system design.
    >>
    >> And by making a "knowledge management system" part of the system design,
    >> what you're proposing is imposing your myopic and intellectually lazy
    >> view
    >> of organization on the world at large. Go ahead and configure your own
    >> computer to a level of simplicity commensurate with your own intellectual
    >> deficit, and leave mine alone.
    >>
    >>
    >> | D.
    >> |
    >> | "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP IE/OE" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in
    >> message
    >> | news:%23VehyjF9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >> | > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >> | > news:uCFJIDD9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    >> | >> Thank you Frank Saunders,
    >> | >> If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    >> | >> d.
    >> | >>
    >> | >> "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    >> | >> news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >> | >>> This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone from
    >> | >>> Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.
    >> | >
    >> | > >
    >> | > --
    >> | > Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    >> | > Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    >> | > http://www.fjsmjs.com
    >> | > Protect your PC
    >> | > http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >> | >
    >> | >
    >> |
    >> |
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Dennis D. wrote:
    > The Dewey decimal system in a library does not dumb down the library. It
    > makes it more functional.
    > Yes it is an imposed strategy, but the application of it is planned and
    > dynamic. If you think about it, schools, hospitals, and government offices
    > are constituted under some undefined organized naming system. KM gives a
    > name to the method of organization, and specifies a plan for implementation.
    >
    > That is no where more important than in information processing, especially
    > in intelligent systems. Microsoft could, and should, be a leader in the
    > field. IBM has already accepted the challenge, and produces product
    > specifically to help with KM in the workplace. Neither corporation seems to
    > have a KM policy at the corporate level, or at least I have been unable to
    > find one, and that is where it should exist.
    >
    > Could be that it is a difficult process, a challenge, to create a (any)
    > policy with such a broad spectrum, and the idea of creating a somewhat
    > restrictive policy on information systems is not in line with things as they
    > are now (the status quo). All the more reason to pursue it I say.
    >
    > D.


    You can't even organize your own thinking, let alone a "knowledge
    management system." Your Dewey Decimal System analogy is irrelevant. You
    want to manage *my* library. I don't think so. And you don't think.
  12. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    I'm old fashioned. To me what remains is simply to read the books. :)

    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    news:OndsDVQ9EHA.3700@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >I add that books organize information. What remains is to organize the
    >books, and then the libraries.
    >
    > D.
    > http://www.dennisys.com/
    >
    > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    > news:emva7FQ9EHA.1452@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >> The Dewey decimal system in a library does not dumb down the library. It
    >> makes it more functional.
    >> Yes it is an imposed strategy, but the application of it is planned and
    >> dynamic. If you think about it, schools, hospitals, and government
    >> offices are constituted under some undefined organized naming system. KM
    >> gives a name to the method of organization, and specifies a plan for
    >> implementation.
    >>
    >> That is no where more important than in information processing,
    >> especially in intelligent systems. Microsoft could, and should, be a
    >> leader in the field. IBM has already accepted the challenge, and produces
    >> product specifically to help with KM in the workplace. Neither
    >> corporation seems to have a KM policy at the corporate level, or at least
    >> I have been unable to find one, and that is where it should exist.
    >>
    >> Could be that it is a difficult process, a challenge, to create a (any)
    >> policy with such a broad spectrum, and the idea of creating a somewhat
    >> restrictive policy on information systems is not in line with things as
    >> they are now (the status quo). All the more reason to pursue it I say.
    >>
    >> D.
    >>
    >> "Raymond J. Johnson Jr." <RayJay@nospam.org> wrote in message
    >> news:eN47A6M9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >>> Responses in line...
    >>>
    >>> "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >>> news:OhOaSaM9EHA.2900@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >>> | >So you're just a troll trying to stir up arguments.
    >>> |
    >>> | This subject began in an attempt to design config files.
    >>> |
    >>> | One of the things Microsoft prides itself in is the number of ways a
    >>> task
    >>> | can be accomplished. This leaves a lot of latitude to the user, but
    >>> the
    >>> user
    >>> | is often confused by the number of choices, not understanding the
    >>> | differences between them. The remedy is to exercise discipline over
    >>> the
    >>> | latitude.
    >>>
    >>> "Discipline the latitude" is Newspeak for "dumb the system down."
    >>>
    >>> |One way to achieve that discipline is to organize the subjects
    >>> | logically.
    >>>
    >>> Thus removing the "latitude" for the user to decide what's logical
    >>> within a
    >>> given context.
    >>>
    >>> | The default naming structure in the file system does not favor logical
    >>> | organization. Examples are: Program Files, and My Documents. In either
    >>> case,
    >>> | a search engine is the best remedy to find a utility or document when
    >>> there
    >>> | are literally thousands of choices in a file tree. As we all know,
    >>> sorting
    >>> | alphabetically falls short primarily due to naming of programs and
    >>> | documents. Example: I want an antivirus program. It is not named
    >>> antivirus.
    >>> | It is under N for SymaNtec. The firewall not named firewall, it is
    >>> under Z
    >>> | for ZoneAlarm. So goodbye "program files", hello
    >>> | science.computer.security.zonealarm.
    >>>
    >>> Where did "science" come from? What good is "computer"? Isn't it bloody
    >>> obvious? What prevents a user from using his "latitude" to create the
    >>> directory structure you suggest, if that's what works best for him?
    >>>
    >>> | As PC storage and networking grow to hold terabytes of data and
    >>> millions
    >>> of
    >>> | files, it becomes apparent that it would be better if the information
    >>> was
    >>> | organized into traditional knowledge groups, thereby shortening search
    >>> times
    >>> | for the user.
    >>>
    >>> There's no such thing as a "traditional knowledge group" except in the
    >>> minds
    >>> of people like you who want to dumb everything down to their own level,
    >>> and
    >>> to hell with anyone who has the temerity to think for himself.
    >>>
    >>> | Another consideration is that with the PC, especially the home PC,
    >>> there
    >>> are
    >>> | multiple uses for the machine, where in business the software is
    >>> limited
    >>> and
    >>> | easily configured. I would tend to design for the home PC (network)
    >>> where
    >>> | the most sophisticated projects can live peacefully with the more
    >>> mundane
    >>> | utilities organized by a subject classification system, or more
    >>> accurately,
    >>> | under a knowledge management system. That KM system should be part of
    >>> the
    >>> | system design.
    >>>
    >>> And by making a "knowledge management system" part of the system design,
    >>> what you're proposing is imposing your myopic and intellectually lazy
    >>> view
    >>> of organization on the world at large. Go ahead and configure your own
    >>> computer to a level of simplicity commensurate with your own
    >>> intellectual
    >>> deficit, and leave mine alone.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> | D.
    >>> |
    >>> | "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP IE/OE" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in
    >>> message
    >>> | news:%23VehyjF9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >>> | > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >>> | > news:uCFJIDD9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    >>> | >> Thank you Frank Saunders,
    >>> | >> If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    >>> | >> d.
    >>> | >>
    >>> | >> "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    >>> | >> news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >>> | >>> This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone
    >>> from
    >>> | >>> Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.
    >>> | >
    >>> | > >
    >>> | > --
    >>> | > Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    >>> | > Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    >>> | > http://www.fjsmjs.com
    >>> | > Protect your PC
    >>> | > http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >>> | >
    >>> | >
    >>> |
    >>> |
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  13. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Thank you for your feedback Ray J. Johnson Jr.

    D.

    "Raymond J. Johnson Jr." <RayJ@nospam.net> wrote in message
    news:348jphF47j6hlU1@individual.net...
    > Dennis D. wrote:
    >> The Dewey decimal system in a library does not dumb down the library. It
    >> makes it more functional.
    >> Yes it is an imposed strategy, but the application of it is planned and
    >> dynamic. If you think about it, schools, hospitals, and government
    >> offices are constituted under some undefined organized naming system. KM
    >> gives a name to the method of organization, and specifies a plan for
    >> implementation.
    >>
    >> That is no where more important than in information processing,
    >> especially in intelligent systems. Microsoft could, and should, be a
    >> leader in the field. IBM has already accepted the challenge, and produces
    >> product specifically to help with KM in the workplace. Neither
    >> corporation seems to have a KM policy at the corporate level, or at least
    >> I have been unable to find one, and that is where it should exist.
    >>
    >> Could be that it is a difficult process, a challenge, to create a (any)
    >> policy with such a broad spectrum, and the idea of creating a somewhat
    >> restrictive policy on information systems is not in line with things as
    >> they are now (the status quo). All the more reason to pursue it I say.
    >>
    >> D.
    >
    >
    > You can't even organize your own thinking, let alone a "knowledge
    > management system." Your Dewey Decimal System analogy is irrelevant. You
    > want to manage *my* library. I don't think so. And you don't think.
  14. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Thank you Colin Barnhorst.
    People under-estimate the power of newsgroups, especially this one.

    Respectfully,
    D.

    "Colin Barnhorst" <colinbarharst(nojunk)@msn.com> wrote in message
    news:%234cZyxS9EHA.4004@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > I'm old fashioned. To me what remains is simply to read the books. :)
    >
    > --
    > Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    > news:OndsDVQ9EHA.3700@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >>I add that books organize information. What remains is to organize the
    >>books, and then the libraries.
    >>
    >> D.
    >> http://www.dennisys.com/
    >>
    >> "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >> news:emva7FQ9EHA.1452@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >>> The Dewey decimal system in a library does not dumb down the library. It
    >>> makes it more functional.
    >>> Yes it is an imposed strategy, but the application of it is planned and
    >>> dynamic. If you think about it, schools, hospitals, and government
    >>> offices are constituted under some undefined organized naming system. KM
    >>> gives a name to the method of organization, and specifies a plan for
    >>> implementation.
    >>>
    >>> That is no where more important than in information processing,
    >>> especially in intelligent systems. Microsoft could, and should, be a
    >>> leader in the field. IBM has already accepted the challenge, and
    >>> produces product specifically to help with KM in the workplace. Neither
    >>> corporation seems to have a KM policy at the corporate level, or at
    >>> least I have been unable to find one, and that is where it should exist.
    >>>
    >>> Could be that it is a difficult process, a challenge, to create a (any)
    >>> policy with such a broad spectrum, and the idea of creating a somewhat
    >>> restrictive policy on information systems is not in line with things as
    >>> they are now (the status quo). All the more reason to pursue it I say.
    >>>
    >>> D.
    >>>
    >>> "Raymond J. Johnson Jr." <RayJay@nospam.org> wrote in message
    >>> news:eN47A6M9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >>>> Responses in line...
    >>>>
    >>>> "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >>>> news:OhOaSaM9EHA.2900@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >>>> | >So you're just a troll trying to stir up arguments.
    >>>> |
    >>>> | This subject began in an attempt to design config files.
    >>>> |
    >>>> | One of the things Microsoft prides itself in is the number of ways a
    >>>> task
    >>>> | can be accomplished. This leaves a lot of latitude to the user, but
    >>>> the
    >>>> user
    >>>> | is often confused by the number of choices, not understanding the
    >>>> | differences between them. The remedy is to exercise discipline over
    >>>> the
    >>>> | latitude.
    >>>>
    >>>> "Discipline the latitude" is Newspeak for "dumb the system down."
    >>>>
    >>>> |One way to achieve that discipline is to organize the subjects
    >>>> | logically.
    >>>>
    >>>> Thus removing the "latitude" for the user to decide what's logical
    >>>> within a
    >>>> given context.
    >>>>
    >>>> | The default naming structure in the file system does not favor
    >>>> logical
    >>>> | organization. Examples are: Program Files, and My Documents. In
    >>>> either
    >>>> case,
    >>>> | a search engine is the best remedy to find a utility or document when
    >>>> there
    >>>> | are literally thousands of choices in a file tree. As we all know,
    >>>> sorting
    >>>> | alphabetically falls short primarily due to naming of programs and
    >>>> | documents. Example: I want an antivirus program. It is not named
    >>>> antivirus.
    >>>> | It is under N for SymaNtec. The firewall not named firewall, it is
    >>>> under Z
    >>>> | for ZoneAlarm. So goodbye "program files", hello
    >>>> | science.computer.security.zonealarm.
    >>>>
    >>>> Where did "science" come from? What good is "computer"? Isn't it
    >>>> bloody
    >>>> obvious? What prevents a user from using his "latitude" to create the
    >>>> directory structure you suggest, if that's what works best for him?
    >>>>
    >>>> | As PC storage and networking grow to hold terabytes of data and
    >>>> millions
    >>>> of
    >>>> | files, it becomes apparent that it would be better if the information
    >>>> was
    >>>> | organized into traditional knowledge groups, thereby shortening
    >>>> search
    >>>> times
    >>>> | for the user.
    >>>>
    >>>> There's no such thing as a "traditional knowledge group" except in the
    >>>> minds
    >>>> of people like you who want to dumb everything down to their own level,
    >>>> and
    >>>> to hell with anyone who has the temerity to think for himself.
    >>>>
    >>>> | Another consideration is that with the PC, especially the home PC,
    >>>> there
    >>>> are
    >>>> | multiple uses for the machine, where in business the software is
    >>>> limited
    >>>> and
    >>>> | easily configured. I would tend to design for the home PC (network)
    >>>> where
    >>>> | the most sophisticated projects can live peacefully with the more
    >>>> mundane
    >>>> | utilities organized by a subject classification system, or more
    >>>> accurately,
    >>>> | under a knowledge management system. That KM system should be part of
    >>>> the
    >>>> | system design.
    >>>>
    >>>> And by making a "knowledge management system" part of the system
    >>>> design,
    >>>> what you're proposing is imposing your myopic and intellectually lazy
    >>>> view
    >>>> of organization on the world at large. Go ahead and configure your own
    >>>> computer to a level of simplicity commensurate with your own
    >>>> intellectual
    >>>> deficit, and leave mine alone.
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> | D.
    >>>> |
    >>>> | "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP IE/OE" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in
    >>>> message
    >>>> | news:%23VehyjF9EHA.3336@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    >>>> | > "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >>>> | > news:uCFJIDD9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl
    >>>> | >> Thank you Frank Saunders,
    >>>> | >> If it were necessary, then it would be useless.
    >>>> | >> d.
    >>>> | >>
    >>>> | >> "Frank Saunders, MS-MVP" <franksaunders@mvps.org> wrote in message
    >>>> | >> news:%23L1r6pA9EHA.1228@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    >>>> | >>> This is a peer to peer support newsgroup. If you want someone
    >>>> from
    >>>> | >>> Microsoft to read your tome follow Carey's advice.
    >>>> | >
    >>>> | > >
    >>>> | > --
    >>>> | > Frank Saunders, MS-MVP, IE/OE
    >>>> | > Please respond in Newsgroup only. Do not send email
    >>>> | > http://www.fjsmjs.com
    >>>> | > Protect your PC
    >>>> | > http://www.microsoft.com./athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >>>> | >
    >>>> | >
    >>>> |
    >>>> |
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>
    >>
    >
    >
  15. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Carey Frisch: I made some minor edits and submitted it to the wish program,
    but never received an acknowledgment or reply. Probably forwarded to the big
    Chinese bit basket.

    Will Microsoft, Intel, and AMD begin selling off their stuff to China, which
    won't need to hire tech support from India, while US techs will be required
    to minor in Manderin?

    Thank you for the suggestion.

    "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
    news:e1Lsmuz8EHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    > How to Contact the Microsoft Wish Program
    > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;114491
    >
    > Microsoft Product Enhancement Suggestions
    > http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp?from=cu&fu=%2Fisapi%2Fgomscom%2Easp%3Ftarget%3D%2Fmswish%2Fthanks%2Ehtm
    >
    > --
    > Carey Frisch
    > Microsoft MVP
    > Windows XP - Shell/User
    >
    > Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    > http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >
    > ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    >
    > "Dennis D." wrote:
    >
    > | To: Microsoft Corporation
    > | From: Undersigned
    > | Subject: Knowledge Management Policy
    > |
    > | Dear Sirs:
    > |
    > | Executive Brief: Author and implement a comprehensive knowledge
    > management
    > | policy.
    > |
    > | Symptoms:
    > | 1. Current search engines require scanning of very large resources to
    > find
    > | very small resources.
    > | 2. Default directory names in Windows Operating Systems as My Documents,
    > My
    > | pictures are machine related, rather than informational.
    > |
    > | Treatment: Adopt a knowledge management policy that is logical and
    > | intelligent, and apply it all products, services, systems, and data,
    > | especially to personal computer operating systems and storage solutions
    > .
    > |
    > | Result: KM policy will be implemented by user (machine and human)
    > methods.
    > |
    > | Meaning: A user will see information organized in a logical hierarchical
    > | system.
    > |
    > | Interpretation: If you want to adopt a strategy of separating
    > applications
    > | from data, then do it, but do it in an intelligent manner. Both the
    > methods
    > | of storage and the content must be logically organized. A user should
    > know
    > | that on any system, whether it be a document system, a storage system,
    > or an
    > | operating system, that a piece of information concerning an atom will be
    > | found in a subtopic of molecule in an applied knowledge management
    > | hierarchy.
    > |
    > | Application: Naming storage drives a: b: c: is intelligent only if the
    > | knowledge management system hierarchical object is naturally alphabetic.
    > In
    > | the application/data scenerio, why not name drives: Applications: Data:,
    > or
    > | better, suggest a naming strategy from Library Science such as,
    > Humanities,
    > | Physical Science, and Social Science? People are involved with Taxonomy,
    > and
    > | Microsoft should lead the charge, because it is developing the tools
    > that
    > | make people smarter.
    > |
    > | Human knowledge can be logically organized. Digital systems must find
    > and
    > | apply algorithms that translate information into something logical,
    > | meaningful, and useful. This incorporates the idea that the solutions
    > | Microsoft provides should, by definition, consider and implement a
    > baseline
    > | knowledge management architecture that can categorize sensory or
    > mechanical
    > | analogs. A knowledge management policy provides the wheels for
    > intelligent
    > | systems.
    > |
    > | --
    > | Dennis D.,
    >
  16. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    news:OkNgMarCFHA.444@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    | Carey Frisch: I made some minor edits and submitted it to the wish
    program,
    | but never received an acknowledgment or reply. Probably forwarded to the
    big | Chinese bit basket.

    Wow, there's a big surprise. I bet they didn't can it before passing it
    around and having a good laugh, though.

    | Will Microsoft, Intel, and AMD begin selling off their stuff to China,
    which
    | won't need to hire tech support from India, while US techs will be
    required
    | to minor in Manderin?

    Do you mean "Mandarin"? Looks like you'd better do a little work on English
    before tackling Chinese.

    |
    | Thank you for the suggestion.
    |
    | "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
    | news:e1Lsmuz8EHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    | > How to Contact the Microsoft Wish Program
    | > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;114491
    | >
    | > Microsoft Product Enhancement Suggestions
    | >
    http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp?from=cu&fu=%2Fisapi%2Fgo
    mscom%2Easp%3Ftarget%3D%2Fmswish%2Fthanks%2Ehtm
    | >
    | > --
    | > Carey Frisch
    | > Microsoft MVP
    | > Windows XP - Shell/User
    | >
    | > Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    | > http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    | >
    |
    > --------------------------------------------------------------------------
    --
    | >
    | > "Dennis D." wrote:
    | >
    | > | To: Microsoft Corporation
    | > | From: Undersigned
    | > | Subject: Knowledge Management Policy
    | > |
    | > | Dear Sirs:
    | > |
    | > | Executive Brief: Author and implement a comprehensive knowledge
    | > management
    | > | policy.
    | > |
    | > | Symptoms:
    | > | 1. Current search engines require scanning of very large resources to
    | > find
    | > | very small resources.
    | > | 2. Default directory names in Windows Operating Systems as My
    Documents,
    | > My
    | > | pictures are machine related, rather than informational.
    | > |
    | > | Treatment: Adopt a knowledge management policy that is logical and
    | > | intelligent, and apply it all products, services, systems, and data,
    | > | especially to personal computer operating systems and storage
    solutions
    | > .
    | > |
    | > | Result: KM policy will be implemented by user (machine and human)
    | > methods.
    | > |
    | > | Meaning: A user will see information organized in a logical
    hierarchical
    | > | system.
    | > |
    | > | Interpretation: If you want to adopt a strategy of separating
    | > applications
    | > | from data, then do it, but do it in an intelligent manner. Both the
    | > methods
    | > | of storage and the content must be logically organized. A user should
    | > know
    | > | that on any system, whether it be a document system, a storage system,
    | > or an
    | > | operating system, that a piece of information concerning an atom will
    be
    | > | found in a subtopic of molecule in an applied knowledge management
    | > | hierarchy.
    | > |
    | > | Application: Naming storage drives a: b: c: is intelligent only if the
    | > | knowledge management system hierarchical object is naturally
    alphabetic.
    | > In
    | > | the application/data scenerio, why not name drives: Applications:
    Data:,
    | > or
    | > | better, suggest a naming strategy from Library Science such as,
    | > Humanities,
    | > | Physical Science, and Social Science? People are involved with
    Taxonomy,
    | > and
    | > | Microsoft should lead the charge, because it is developing the tools
    | > that
    | > | make people smarter.
    | > |
    | > | Human knowledge can be logically organized. Digital systems must find
    | > and
    | > | apply algorithms that translate information into something logical,
    | > | meaningful, and useful. This incorporates the idea that the solutions
    | > | Microsoft provides should, by definition, consider and implement a
    | > baseline
    | > | knowledge management architecture that can categorize sensory or
    | > mechanical
    | > | analogs. A knowledge management policy provides the wheels for
    | > intelligent
    | > | systems.
    | > |
    | > | --
    | > | Dennis D.,
    | >
    |
    |
  17. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    >>Carey Frisch: I made some minor edits and submitted it to
    the wish program, but never received an acknowledgment
    or reply. Probably forwarded to the Chinese bit basket.
    >>
    > Wow, there's a big surprise. I bet they didn't can it before
    > passing it around and having a good laugh, though.

    I don't envy anyone with a headache.
    >
    >>Will Microsoft, Intel, and AMD begin selling off their stuff
    >> to China, which won't need to hire tech support from India,
    >> while US techs will be required to minor in Manderin?
    >
    > Do you mean "Mandarin"? Looks like you'd better do
    > a little work on English before tackling Chinese.

    Guess that pinpoints your opinion on that subject!
  18. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    On Fri, 4 Feb 2005 07:51:40 -0600, "Raymond J. Johnson Jr."
    <RayJay@nospam.org> wrote:

    >
    >"Dennis D." <tech@dennisys.com> wrote in message
    >news:OkNgMarCFHA.444@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >| Carey Frisch: I made some minor edits and submitted it to the wish
    >program,
    >| but never received an acknowledgment or reply. Probably forwarded to the
    >big | Chinese bit basket.
    >
    >Wow, there's a big surprise. I bet they didn't can it before passing it
    >around and having a good laugh, though.
    >
    >| Will Microsoft, Intel, and AMD begin selling off their stuff to China,
    >which
    >| won't need to hire tech support from India, while US techs will be
    >required
    >| to minor in Manderin?
    >
    >Do you mean "Mandarin"? Looks like you'd better do a little work on English
    >before tackling Chinese.
    >
    >|
    >| Thank you for the suggestion.
    >|
    >| "Carey Frisch [MVP]" <cnfrisch@nospamgmail.com> wrote in message
    >| news:e1Lsmuz8EHA.3596@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
    >| > How to Contact the Microsoft Wish Program
    >| > http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;114491
    >| >
    >| > Microsoft Product Enhancement Suggestions
    >| >
    >http://register.microsoft.com/mswish/suggestion.asp?from=cu&fu=%2Fisapi%2Fgo
    >mscom%2Easp%3Ftarget%3D%2Fmswish%2Fthanks%2Ehtm
    >| >
    >| > --
    >| > Carey Frisch
    >| > Microsoft MVP
    >| > Windows XP - Shell/User
    >| >
    >| > Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    >| > http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx
    >| >
    >|
    >> --------------------------------------------------------------------------

    I think he refers to Mandy (Jones Crusher) Rhein,
    mistress of exotic dance in Hamburg, circa 1871
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