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Virtual memory settings

Last response: in Windows 8
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February 19, 2012 7:57:50 AM

Hello,
what does mean by virtual memory size?
a b * Windows 8
February 19, 2012 7:59:37 AM

If you need to ask that question, you really shouldn't be using the developer preview build...
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a b * Windows 8
February 19, 2012 12:32:12 PM

The_Prophecy said:
If you need to ask that question, you really shouldn't be using the developer preview build...



Hi :) 

That was a GREAT answer lolllllllllll

All the best Brett :) 
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February 20, 2012 4:31:31 PM

Leave it on system managed if you need to ask that question.

Seriously, barring a dataset thats measures around 16GB or so, there is VERY little reason anyone should touch the virtual memory settings within windows anymore.
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a b * Windows 8
February 20, 2012 4:49:05 PM

set your VM size to 1.5 the actual size of the physical ram you have. ALWAYS!.
so if you have 4 gigs of ram your vm ram should be no bigger than 6gig no smaller than 5.9
virtual memory is a hard drive allocated memory block. where part of the HDD is set aside to help store commonly used data that needs more memory than you have... say you have a render thats 6gigs (not impossible with 3ds max) and you only have 4gig of physical ram. so the picture is stored on the hdd. any changes you make are written directly to the picture just like in memory. all be it at a much slower rate, due to the hdd having tiny bandwidth compared to actual memory. this is where quicksync on the new sandy bridge comes in. it acts in a similar way but is much faster.
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February 20, 2012 5:06:41 PM

If you are having to resort to increasing the size of your system's virtual memory it's time to go get more RAM. The stuff is dirt cheap at the moment and the pain that I have experienced personally having to wait for an application to process datasets that didn't fit in physical memory make a RAM upgrade more than worth while.
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February 20, 2012 5:26:37 PM

Thanks for the helpful answer Hex, I've always been curious about this too, but not curious enough to waste wikipedia time on it :) .
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March 6, 2012 5:06:48 PM

Virtual Memory is physical memory + page file(swap). The reason for this is your can page in/out data from memory. If you only have 1GB of ram and your program needs 2gb to run, the OS will page out some memory to the HD to make it look like you have more memory.

From an application's stand point, it only ever sees the virtual memory. If you have 4GB of ram and 4GB of page file, the OS will pretend you have 8GB of total memory. Aka, virtual memory. One could also say your total "logical" memory.
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March 14, 2012 11:39:11 PM

HEXiT said:
set your VM size to 1.5 the actual size of the physical ram you have. ALWAYS!.
so if you have 4 gigs of ram your vm ram should be no bigger than 6gig no smaller than 5.9
virtual memory is a hard drive allocated memory block. where part of the HDD is set aside to help store commonly used data that needs more memory than you have... say you have a render thats 6gigs (not impossible with 3ds max) and you only have 4gig of physical ram. so the picture is stored on the hdd. any changes you make are written directly to the picture just like in memory. all be it at a much slower rate, due to the hdd having tiny bandwidth compared to actual memory. this is where quicksync on the new sandy bridge comes in. it acts in a similar way but is much faster.



There are virtual memory operating systems that do not page or have paging space. Virtual memory is most commonly used for protection between processes and to allow the apparently (virtually) sequential allocation of discontinuous blocks of physical memory. "virtual memory is a hard drive allocated memory block." is close but not correct. Do read wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virtual_memory

"... due to the hdd having tiny bandwidth compared to actual memory. this is where quicksync on the new sandy bridge comes in. " Quicksync has nothing at all to do with disk or virtual memory. Transcoding is very CPU intensive. Intel built new instructions in Sandybridge to increase the speed of transcoding. Again see good old wikipedia. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quick_Sync
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