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I need help! Installing a core 2 duo

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December 7, 2006 5:09:41 AM

Hey guys, I just bought all the parts for a new system and I'm putting in the cpu right now and After puting the cpu in the socket, I closed the flap and went to lower the lever to lock it into place. BUT the lever is offering a significant amount of resistance, is this normal? I made sure to line up parts h ang g as the instructions say and it appears to be in place. What do you suggest?
Thanks
Dev

More about : installing core duo

December 7, 2006 5:52:14 AM

Quote:
Hey guys, I just bought all the parts for a new system and I'm putting in the cpu right now and After puting the cpu in the socket, I closed the flap and went to lower the lever to lock it into place. BUT the lever is offering a significant amount of resistance, is this normal? I made sure to line up parts h ang g as the instructions say and it appears to be in place. What do you suggest?
Thanks
Dev

Don't force CPU cover plate :roll:

Better to take CPU out and inspect just in case :idea:

If CPU comes out with no resistance/binding in socket then all should be well.

Check socket for any manufacture flaw.

Check for damaged pins but don't touch them :oops: 

There should not be too much resistance but expect some.

Fit HSF with MB in case as instructed (Intel guidelines)

Then remove MB (if only one removable side panel in case/tower), and make sure HSF clips are through MB.

If this is not done, HSF can have reduced tension on CPU and cause OH probs as reported in some posts.
December 7, 2006 6:04:16 AM

I took the CPU our and it looks fine, there was no resistance and it seems to go into the socket perfectly as well. The socket looks good as far as i can tell. I did notice that the Cover place seems to have a slight curve to it pulling away from where the cpu would go and that the metal side bars seem to be bent in towards the cpu, so im wondering if its just a matter of bending the metal. Any others suggestions?

Edit- about how much resistance do you think ther eshould be 5 lbs? ie the weight of my arm of my hand pushing a little etc.... Thanks I havnt installed a chip since 478 and this is much more of a pain.
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December 7, 2006 6:17:44 AM

Quote:
I took the CPU our and it looks fine, there was no resistance and it seems to go into the socket perfectly as well. The socket looks good as far as i can tell. I did notice that the Cover place seems to have a slight curve to it pulling away from where the cpu would go and that the metal side bars seem to be bent in towards the cpu, so im wondering if its just a matter of bending the metal. Any others suggestions?

Edit- about how much resistance do you think ther eshould be 5 lbs? ie the weight of my arm of my hand pushing a little etc.... Thanks I havnt installed a chip since 478 and this is much more of a pain.


Remember when you closed the arm with the 478.

There should be roughly the same amount of tension.

All it needs to do is apply some contact to the pins and a shoulder in the socket base.

Do a google search of LGA775 socket Images and refer to that at what it should look like. Look at Intels images also.

If it looks like there is a fault with your MB socket, return MB. Probably won't do any good though. I bought a new AM2 MB a while ago and when I opened the box at home, saw that the MB had been used before :x - probably demo or return.

My retailer would'nt accept back. I shop elsewhere now.

I hope yours is not the same situation.
December 7, 2006 6:24:17 AM

Quote:
I bought a new AM2 MB a while ago and when I opened the box at home, saw that the MB had been used before :x - probably demo or return.


Report the SOB to your BBB. Raise as much hell as you can. Vendors should know better than to try and pull that crap on customers. I'm actually surprised that more MB and other board manufacturers don't use tamperproof seals so you can see if it's been messed with.
December 7, 2006 6:24:22 AM

Me too!

Thanks
a b à CPUs
December 7, 2006 6:25:01 AM

Don't try to bend anything or force it. That's pretty hard stainless, but no adjustment should be attempted. If it won't latch with 3-5 pounds, then there is something flawed with your socket 775, in which case you may need to seek an RMA exchange. Sorry :cry: 
December 7, 2006 6:27:39 AM

Quote:
Don't try to bend anything or force it. That's pretty hard stainless, but no adjustment should be attempted. If it won't latch with 3-5 pounds, then there is something flawed with your socket 775, in which case you may need to seek an RMA exchange. Sorry :cry: 


Nah. Just take an 8-pound sledge and hammer that sucka into the socket.

JUST KIDDING! :lol: 

I figure that if the latch doesn't go down with a firm one-finger push, there is something seriously wrong.
December 7, 2006 6:32:39 AM

Ya it definately seems to be defective! YAY! lol its requireing alot more force then the last one. I think the cover plate is bent the wrong way.
a b à CPUs
December 7, 2006 6:35:05 AM

RMA
December 7, 2006 6:35:05 AM

Quote:
I bought a new AM2 MB a while ago and when I opened the box at home, saw that the MB had been used before :x - probably demo or return.


Report the SOB to your BBB. Raise as much hell as you can. Vendors should know better than to try and pull that crap on customers. I'm actually surprised that more MB and other board manufacturers don't use tamperproof seals so you can see if it's been messed with.
Yes I agree!

Previous ASUS MB boxs I have bought had a seal on box and antistatic bag.

But for some reason, ASUS has stopped this on the products I have bought recently.

As a result, the only way you can check to see now if MB has been removed from box is the way it has been packed.

Manufacturers pack well where stores just quickly repack.

Good idea if no seal on box when you purchase it, is too open it at the store and have a quick visual look.

If not neat and tidy, ask for another one and check.

No harm done as all you are doing is visually checking it. No need to remove from box to do this.
December 7, 2006 6:35:52 AM

Quote:
Ya it definately seems to be defective! YAY! lol its requireing alot more force then the last one. I think the cover plate is bent the wrong way.


Gimme an R!

Gimme an M!

Gimme an A!

Whaddyagot?

R M A !
December 7, 2006 6:39:10 AM

Quote:
I bought a new AM2 MB a while ago and when I opened the box at home, saw that the MB had been used before :x - probably demo or return.


Report the SOB to your BBB. Raise as much hell as you can. Vendors should know better than to try and pull that crap on customers. I'm actually surprised that more MB and other board manufacturers don't use tamperproof seals so you can see if it's been messed with.
Yes I agree!

Previous ASUS MB boxs I have bought had a seal on box and antistatic bag.

But for some reason, ASUS has stopped this on the products I have bought recently.

As a result, the only way you can check to see now if MB has been removed from box is the way it has been packed.

Manufacturers pack well where stores just quickly repack.

Good idea if no seal on box when you purchase it, is too open it at the store and have a quick visual look.

If not neat and tidy, ask for another one and check.

No harm done as all you are doing is visually checking it. No need to remove from box to do this.

I know a guy in LA who is a total hw freak. He orders two or three components a week. Lives on cutrate beer and stale peanuts as he plumbs every dime into hw. He has a procedure that I think we would all be wise to adopt. When the UPS man comes to the door, he insists that he wait for just a minute while he opens the box in his view. A quick check to make sure that all the seals are unmessed-with and worse still that the box isn't full of rocks, and everybody's happy.
a b à CPUs
December 7, 2006 6:42:21 AM

Quote:
When the UPS man comes to the door, he insists that he wait for just a minute while he opens the box in his view. A quick check to make sure that all the seals are unmessed-with and worse still that the box isn't full of rocks, and everybody's happy.


Just what I always say! "How can Brown let you down?"
December 7, 2006 6:42:25 AM

Quote:
Ya it definately seems to be defective! YAY! lol its requireing alot more force then the last one. I think the cover plate is bent the wrong way.

I hope you did not damage the CPU.

Now check the CPU for damage - twist/out of form,etc.
December 7, 2006 6:58:27 AM

Ok after further inspection of the socket without the cpu in it, there is about 1 mm of space or less from the pins to the cover and the space is not equi distant along the entire socket. It almost looks like someone pushed down on it. Ill try to get a picture tomorrow, but i need to get some sleep tonight.

Edit - I ended up just sending it back.
December 7, 2006 7:57:08 AM

Quote:
Ok after further inspection of the socket without the cpu in it, there is about 1 mm of space or less from the pins to the cover and the space is not equi distant along the entire socket. It almost looks like someone pushed down on it. Ill try to get a picture tomorrow, but i need to get some sleep tonight.


Sounds like someone's used it to pry the hubcaps off their 1929 Reo Flatbed. :lol: 
December 7, 2006 6:12:19 PM

Mine was a little tough closing as well. Read the install guide (dunno if it was the one that came with the cpu or mobo), it suggested applying pressure with one finger on the cpu, then closing the latch. Worked like a charm.
December 7, 2006 6:49:38 PM

It takes a fairly firm push to get the arm under the latch.
December 7, 2006 9:09:01 PM

Quote:
it suggested applying pressure with one finger on the cpu, then closing the latch.

I think you meant one finger on the cover plate! 8O

Oops! :oops:  Yes I did!

Quote:
It takes a fairly firm push to get the arm under the latch.

And that too! You shouldn't force it, but you do have to apply a little pressure.
December 8, 2006 8:59:48 PM

Quote:
it suggested applying pressure with one finger on the cpu, then closing the latch.

I think you meant one finger on the cover plate! 8O

Oops! :oops:  Yes I did!

Quote:
It takes a fairly firm push to get the arm under the latch.

And that too! You shouldn't force it, but you do have to apply a little pressure.

I'm having this exact same problem with my Core 2 Duo and a Gigabyte DS3 mobo. I aligned the CPU as the instructions show with the gold triangle pointing to the lever. It doesn't sink down at all though, and I don't see how it could. The instructions say to make sure the pins all align with the CPU, but the bottom of the cpu only has gold plated contacts, and not receivers for the pins.

The cover plate is also slightly bent as the guy above said, and when I close the plate (pushing down on the processor with one finger), the CPU doesn't sink at all, and the cover plate rests on top of the CPU a noticeable amount above where it should rest. Pulling the arm lever up doesn't help seat it any more either.

I tried taking the CPU out and reseating it a bunch of times, and it always sits the same. Am I having the same problem as this guy, or should the CPU be sinking into the socket more than I'm seeing (and if so should it sink in pretty easily?).

Another side question, the packaging all of my parts came in had styrofoam peanuts in it which were all pretty staticy. I haven't worked inside a computer for a long time, so I checked online about how to avoid static discharge, and tell me if I'm doing this right. I touched a metal sink facuet initially to ground myself, then installed the CPU into the case and plugged it in. While working on sensitive parts I'm keeping one hand touching the PSU. Am I going about this wrong or what should I be doing (I don't have a static wristband as I've seen recommend).
December 8, 2006 9:01:42 PM

Quote:
it suggested applying pressure with one finger on the cpu, then closing the latch.

I think you meant one finger on the cover plate! 8O

Oops! :oops:  Yes I did!

Quote:
It takes a fairly firm push to get the arm under the latch.

And that too! You shouldn't force it, but you do have to apply a little pressure.

I'm having this exact same problem with my Core 2 Duo and a Gigabyte DS3 mobo. I aligned the CPU as the instructions show with the gold triangle pointing to the lever. It doesn't sink down at all though, and I don't see how it could. The instructions say to make sure the pins all align with the CPU, but the bottom of the cpu only has gold plated contacts, and not receivers for the pins.

The cover plate is also slightly bent as the guy above said, and when I close the plate (pushing down on the processor with one finger), the CPU doesn't sink at all, and the cover plate rests on top of the CPU a noticeable amount above where it should rest. Pulling the arm lever up doesn't help seat it any more either.

I tried taking the CPU out and reseating it a bunch of times, and it always sits the same. Am I having the same problem as this guy, or should the CPU be sinking into the socket more than I'm seeing (and if so should it sink in pretty easily?).

Another side question, the packaging all of my parts came in had styrofoam peanuts in it which were all pretty staticy. I haven't worked inside a computer for a long time, so I checked online about how to avoid static discharge, and tell me if I'm doing this right. I touched a metal sink facuet initially to ground myself, then installed the CPU into the case and plugged it in. While working on sensitive parts I'm keeping one hand touching the PSU. Am I going about this wrong or what should I be doing (I don't have a static wristband as I've seen recommend).

The processor just sits in the socket - there's no force involved. Its when you throw the little arm that you have to lean into it.
December 8, 2006 9:14:22 PM

Quote:
it suggested applying pressure with one finger on the cpu, then closing the latch.

I think you meant one finger on the cover plate! 8O

Oops! :oops:  Yes I did!

Quote:
It takes a fairly firm push to get the arm under the latch.

And that too! You shouldn't force it, but you do have to apply a little pressure.

I'm having this exact same problem with my Core 2 Duo and a Gigabyte DS3 mobo. I aligned the CPU as the instructions show with the gold triangle pointing to the lever. It doesn't sink down at all though, and I don't see how it could. The instructions say to make sure the pins all align with the CPU, but the bottom of the cpu only has gold plated contacts, and not receivers for the pins.

The cover plate is also slightly bent as the guy above said, and when I close the plate (pushing down on the processor with one finger), the CPU doesn't sink at all, and the cover plate rests on top of the CPU a noticeable amount above where it should rest. Pulling the arm lever up doesn't help seat it any more either.

I tried taking the CPU out and reseating it a bunch of times, and it always sits the same. Am I having the same problem as this guy, or should the CPU be sinking into the socket more than I'm seeing (and if so should it sink in pretty easily?).

Another side question, the packaging all of my parts came in had styrofoam peanuts in it which were all pretty staticy. I haven't worked inside a computer for a long time, so I checked online about how to avoid static discharge, and tell me if I'm doing this right. I touched a metal sink facuet initially to ground myself, then installed the CPU into the case and plugged it in. While working on sensitive parts I'm keeping one hand touching the PSU. Am I going about this wrong or what should I be doing (I don't have a static wristband as I've seen recommend).

The processor just sits in the socket - there's no force involved. Its when you throw the little arm that you have to lean into it.

Ok, when I push down on the level (and the cpu at the same time) it still doesn't budge at all. The sides of the hatch rest just above the rim of the socket (3-4mm above where it should be?). Is there a defect in the mobo socket and I need to return it? :( 

Also the instructions say to apply some heatsink lube to the top of the processor. I have arctic silver 5 for a zalman cooler I got, is this what I put there?
December 8, 2006 10:02:15 PM

Quote:
it suggested applying pressure with one finger on the cpu, then closing the latch.

I think you meant one finger on the cover plate! 8O

Oops! :oops:  Yes I did!

Quote:
It takes a fairly firm push to get the arm under the latch.

And that too! You shouldn't force it, but you do have to apply a little pressure.

I'm having this exact same problem with my Core 2 Duo and a Gigabyte DS3 mobo. I aligned the CPU as the instructions show with the gold triangle pointing to the lever. It doesn't sink down at all though, and I don't see how it could. The instructions say to make sure the pins all align with the CPU, but the bottom of the cpu only has gold plated contacts, and not receivers for the pins.

The cover plate is also slightly bent as the guy above said, and when I close the plate (pushing down on the processor with one finger), the CPU doesn't sink at all, and the cover plate rests on top of the CPU a noticeable amount above where it should rest. Pulling the arm lever up doesn't help seat it any more either.

I tried taking the CPU out and reseating it a bunch of times, and it always sits the same. Am I having the same problem as this guy, or should the CPU be sinking into the socket more than I'm seeing (and if so should it sink in pretty easily?).

Another side question, the packaging all of my parts came in had styrofoam peanuts in it which were all pretty staticy. I haven't worked inside a computer for a long time, so I checked online about how to avoid static discharge, and tell me if I'm doing this right. I touched a metal sink facuet initially to ground myself, then installed the CPU into the case and plugged it in. While working on sensitive parts I'm keeping one hand touching the PSU. Am I going about this wrong or what should I be doing (I don't have a static wristband as I've seen recommend).

The processor just sits in the socket - there's no force involved. Its when you throw the little arm that you have to lean into it.

Ok, when I push down on the level (and the cpu at the same time) it still doesn't budge at all. The sides of the hatch rest just above the rim of the socket (3-4mm above where it should be?). Is there a defect in the mobo socket and I need to return it? :( 

Also the instructions say to apply some heatsink lube to the top of the processor. I have arctic silver 5 for a zalman cooler I got, is this what I put there?

The processor will not sink into the socket at all - it just sits on it. If you're able to latch the arm at all, its probably in right.

And you apply whatever thermal paste you have to the top of the processor after you get it mounted in the socket.
December 8, 2006 10:12:32 PM

Quote:
Ok, when I push down on the level (and the cpu at the same time) it still doesn't budge at all.

Reread the above posts. I incorrectly stated to put pressure on the cpu. Apply pressure to the cover plate with one finger, then close the latch. It does take a little pressure, but you shouldn't have to force it.
December 8, 2006 10:34:09 PM

Quote:
Ok, when I push down on the level (and the cpu at the same time) it still doesn't budge at all.

Reread the above posts. I incorrectly stated to put pressure on the cpu. Apply pressure to the cover plate with one finger, then close the latch. It does take a little pressure, but you shouldn't have to force it.

Well, it seemed obvious to me that the hatch was bent, so I took it off and hammered the curve of it out so that it didn't curve upwards. It then came almost all the way down to cover the CPU, but took more than a little bit of pressure to lift the cover arm into place. There was a slight scrunching noise from the socket as I pushed the arm into place. Any chance I hurt anything, or that the CPU wasn't situated properly? We'll find out I guess.
December 8, 2006 11:38:47 PM

Quote:
Ok, when I push down on the level (and the cpu at the same time) it still doesn't budge at all.

Reread the above posts. I incorrectly stated to put pressure on the cpu. Apply pressure to the cover plate with one finger, then close the latch. It does take a little pressure, but you shouldn't have to force it.

Well, it seemed obvious to me that the hatch was bent, so I took it off and hammered the curve of it out so that it didn't curve upwards. It then came almost all the way down to cover the CPU, but took more than a little bit of pressure to lift the cover arm into place. There was a slight scrunching noise from the socket as I pushed the arm into place. Any chance I hurt anything, or that the CPU wasn't situated properly? We'll find out I guess.

Sounds like you munged it. Better luck with your new motherboard.
December 9, 2006 12:07:15 AM

Quote:
it suggested applying pressure with one finger on the cpu, then closing the latch.

I think you meant one finger on the cover plate! 8O

Oops! :oops:  Yes I did!

Quote:
It takes a fairly firm push to get the arm under the latch.

And that too! You shouldn't force it, but you do have to apply a little pressure.

I'm having this exact same problem with my Core 2 Duo and a Gigabyte DS3 mobo. I aligned the CPU as the instructions show with the gold triangle pointing to the lever. It doesn't sink down at all though, and I don't see how it could. The instructions say to make sure the pins all align with the CPU, but the bottom of the cpu only has gold plated contacts, and not receivers for the pins.

The cover plate is also slightly bent as the guy above said, and when I close the plate (pushing down on the processor with one finger), the CPU doesn't sink at all, and the cover plate rests on top of the CPU a noticeable amount above where it should rest. Pulling the arm lever up doesn't help seat it any more either.

I tried taking the CPU out and reseating it a bunch of times, and it always sits the same. Am I having the same problem as this guy, or should the CPU be sinking into the socket more than I'm seeing (and if so should it sink in pretty easily?).

Another side question, the packaging all of my parts came in had styrofoam peanuts in it which were all pretty staticy. I haven't worked inside a computer for a long time, so I checked online about how to avoid static discharge, and tell me if I'm doing this right. I touched a metal sink facuet initially to ground myself, then installed the CPU into the case and plugged it in. While working on sensitive parts I'm keeping one hand touching the PSU. Am I going about this wrong or what should I be doing (I don't have a static wristband as I've seen recommend).
Never seen styrofoam used for packaging sensitive PC parts before. Mainboard should be OK though.

I don't like the LGA sockets as they are vulnerable, wher'as the AM2 type sockets are well protected. But LGA is the way of the future as more pins/contacts are required.

Bent parts - this is what you get when they mass produce.

If plate is only slightly bent, it should be OK and straighten out when closed on CPU for a time.
!