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Firefox Security Warning

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Anonymous
a b 8 Security
January 7, 2005 3:12:21 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Seeing as how so many have switched to Firefox (including myself) I thought
this should maybe be posted here.

It it offends anyone by being considered out of place - I appologize in
advance!
Phishers catch out Firefox
Browser open to URL spoofing
Robert Jaques, vnunet.com 07 Jan 2005

link to article: http://www.vnunet.com/news/1160352

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!
January 7, 2005 3:12:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

On 1/7/2005 9:12 AM On a whim, Richard Urban pounded out on the keyboard

> Seeing as how so many have switched to Firefox (including myself) I thought
> this should maybe be posted here.
>
> It it offends anyone by being considered out of place - I appologize in
> advance!
> Phishers catch out Firefox
> Browser open to URL spoofing
> Robert Jaques, vnunet.com 07 Jan 2005
>
> link to article: http://www.vnunet.com/news/1160352
>

Herein lies the problem for most people;
"Balle urged users not to follow download links from untrusted sources."

Until people stop clicking on OK whenever it pops up without knowing
what exactly they're agreeing to, this will remain a problem on any browser.

--
Terry

***Reply Note***
Anti-spam measures are included in my email address.
Delete NOSPAM from the email address after clicking Reply.
January 7, 2005 3:12:23 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin,microsoft.public.win98.gen_discussion (More info?)

Very true, when will people ever learn. <sigh>

"Terry" <F1ComNOSPAM@pobox.com> wrote in message
news:eJ84jLO9EHA.2680@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> On 1/7/2005 9:12 AM On a whim, Richard Urban pounded out on the keyboard
>
> > Seeing as how so many have switched to Firefox (including myself) I
thought
> > this should maybe be posted here.
> >
> > It it offends anyone by being considered out of place - I appologize in
> > advance!
> > Phishers catch out Firefox
> > Browser open to URL spoofing
> > Robert Jaques, vnunet.com 07 Jan 2005
> >
> > link to article: http://www.vnunet.com/news/1160352
> >
>
> Herein lies the problem for most people;
> "Balle urged users not to follow download links from untrusted sources."
>
> Until people stop clicking on OK whenever it pops up without knowing
> what exactly they're agreeing to, this will remain a problem on any
browser.
>
> --
> Terry
>
> ***Reply Note***
> Anti-spam measures are included in my email address.
> Delete NOSPAM from the email address after clicking Reply.
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
January 7, 2005 4:43:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 12:12:21 -0500, Richard Urban
<richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote:

> Seeing as how so many have switched to Firefox (including myself) I
> thought
> this should maybe be posted here.
>
> It it offends anyone by being considered out of place - I appologize in
> advance!
> Phishers catch out Firefox
> Browser open to URL spoofing
> Robert Jaques, vnunet.com 07 Jan 2005
>
> link to article: http://www.vnunet.com/news/1160352
>

Hmm, didn't see my default browser listed there... Opera.

--
Albert Sims
West Monroe,Louisiana
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
January 8, 2005 1:12:40 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Perhaps an important question to ask is: why do they need to learn?

Why do web sites need to download software to my computer? Have we become
so addicted to, um, "flashy" interactions that we are unsatisfied with basic
delivery of reasonably-formatted text?

I'm not intending to sound curmudgeonly here (but my 39th birthday is next
month, so I'm permitted to, right?). I don't have all the answers to these
questions, but they nag me. I'm certainly a believer in using the power of
the Internet and software to make peoples' lives better and to accelerate
business, but whatever happened to simple information delivery and consumption?

</nostalgia>

Steve Riley
steriley@microsoft.com



> Very true, when will people ever learn. <sigh>
>
>> Herein lies the problem for most people;
>> "Balle urged users not to follow download links from untrusted
>> sources."
>> Until people stop clicking on OK whenever it pops up without knowing
>> what exactly they're agreeing to, this will remain a problem on any
>>
> browser.
January 8, 2005 1:29:36 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Opera has ads unless you pay for it.

"Albert Sims" <alsims65@nospamhotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o psj8zqnb0sjn1bj@your-pa86z1i3g7...
> On Fri, 7 Jan 2005 12:12:21 -0500, Richard Urban
> <richardurbanREMOVETHIS@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
> > Seeing as how so many have switched to Firefox (including myself) I
> > thought
> > this should maybe be posted here.
> >
> > It it offends anyone by being considered out of place - I appologize in
> > advance!
> > Phishers catch out Firefox
> > Browser open to URL spoofing
> > Robert Jaques, vnunet.com 07 Jan 2005
> >
> > link to article: http://www.vnunet.com/news/1160352
> >
>
> Hmm, didn't see my default browser listed there... Opera.
>
> --
> Albert Sims
> West Monroe,Louisiana
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
January 8, 2005 5:20:34 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

Steve

There was a time when you could buy a vcr that only recorded on the day..
but that wasn't enough.. you wanted to set record a week in advance in case
you forgot something.. then a month.. but it was awkward to do from the
front panel, so you asked for a remote.. but that was still awkward because
the panel on the front was difficult to read from the couch.. enter the lcd
display.. oh.. and picture in picture so you could watch the recorded movie
and still keep up with the game.. or maybe the other way around.. and don't
forget the surround sound link from the stereo and a remote that does it
all, TV, VCR, Stereo.. getting a little complex eh.. not a problem.. add a
bar code reader.. now you just scan the programme guide.. whoa up, Granny
can't work the remote.. maybe you should have a second one with just basic
controls, because she'll never get the hang of the full color lcd display
and all of the sliding covers..

Awww nuts.. lets get a DVD player,, did ya see the one that allows you to go
forwards and backwards through the movie you are recording, while you watch
three other channels, all interactive.. it is even loaded with the latest MS
software codenamed Wedaf.. 'Windows for Excessive Domestic Appliance
Features.. that should be easy enough to configure.. at least until the kids
find out that by pressing a few keys, they can programme a wash cycle where
once the football game used to be, and lock you out of the program..

When life was simple, we were bored.. so we set in motion the monster that
is progress when we asked for more.. what we forgot along the way was how
difficult it was to understand the instructions for recording on the day..
or even tuning the vcr to the TV..

...And I'm allowed because it is was my birthday yesterday, and I still can't
work the vcr.. the manual is like 'War and Peace' in pictures, printed in
seven languages, six of which I have no clue.. what happened to the little
red button that you could press and know that you would get a recording
while you go out to fix a computer system where an innocent operator is
claiming that they did nothing prior to the deletion of an entire Unix OS
that saw an end to the entire RAID structure while they replaced a tape in
the Magstar drive that has mysteriously jammed because they didn't put it in
the wrong way.. :) ))

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/user



"Steve Riley [MSFT]" <steriley@microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:40636632407327567235072@news.microsoft.com...
> Perhaps an important question to ask is: why do they need to learn?
>
> Why do web sites need to download software to my computer? Have we become
> so addicted to, um, "flashy" interactions that we are unsatisfied with
> basic delivery of reasonably-formatted text?
>
> I'm not intending to sound curmudgeonly here (but my 39th birthday is next
> month, so I'm permitted to, right?). I don't have all the answers to these
> questions, but they nag me. I'm certainly a believer in using the power of
> the Internet and software to make peoples' lives better and to accelerate
> business, but whatever happened to simple information delivery and
> consumption?
>
> </nostalgia>
>
> Steve Riley
> steriley@microsoft.com
>
>
>
>> Very true, when will people ever learn. <sigh>
>>
>>> Herein lies the problem for most people;
>>> "Balle urged users not to follow download links from untrusted
>>> sources."
>>> Until people stop clicking on OK whenever it pops up without knowing
>>> what exactly they're agreeing to, this will remain a problem on any
>>>
>> browser.
>
>
January 8, 2005 9:53:09 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

<snipped because it is getting way too long>

Linux has the same problem that all the other responders to this post have
pointed out. I had a co-worker that was trying Linux and found his hard
drive was out of disk space. Get this! The Red Hat installation he used
came with a CD that enabled the NFS and anonymouse FTP servers by DEFAULT!
In my former zeal of spreading Linux to the masses, I gave a friend a copy
of Debian GNU/Linux for Dummies as a gift. Guess what? NFS and FTP server
running in the DEFAULT installation!

So, I like open source software and have even written a few little
application myself. However, I made them open source and freely available
because I never want to be responsible for addressing problems that may or
may not exist in the software! All I'm saying is that much of the Open
Source community is the same way. As a business owner, I would rather have
a known cost for a known level of service, good or bad, just not
indifferent.

carl

The thing that I wonder about is how can one make sure that open source is
safe. I mean that I use and like Mozilla Firefox and use it exclusively
except where IE is required such as accesssing Windows Update. I personally
have not downloaded and installed the plugins or extensions except for one
because of the possibility that they may have malicious code attached to
them. My question is how can the open source community prevent malicious
creators of the plugins or extensions from attaching malicious code?
January 8, 2005 2:43:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

On 1/8/2005 5:53 AM On a whim, Dan pounded out on the keyboard

> <snipped because it is getting way too long>
>
> Linux has the same problem that all the other responders to this post have
> pointed out. I had a co-worker that was trying Linux and found his hard
> drive was out of disk space. Get this! The Red Hat installation he used
> came with a CD that enabled the NFS and anonymouse FTP servers by DEFAULT!
> In my former zeal of spreading Linux to the masses, I gave a friend a copy
> of Debian GNU/Linux for Dummies as a gift. Guess what? NFS and FTP server
> running in the DEFAULT installation!
>
> So, I like open source software and have even written a few little
> application myself. However, I made them open source and freely available
> because I never want to be responsible for addressing problems that may or
> may not exist in the software! All I'm saying is that much of the Open
> Source community is the same way. As a business owner, I would rather have
> a known cost for a known level of service, good or bad, just not
> indifferent.
>
> carl
>
> The thing that I wonder about is how can one make sure that open source is
> safe. I mean that I use and like Mozilla Firefox and use it exclusively
> except where IE is required such as accesssing Windows Update. I personally
> have not downloaded and installed the plugins or extensions except for one
> because of the possibility that they may have malicious code attached to
> them. My question is how can the open source community prevent malicious
> creators of the plugins or extensions from attaching malicious code?
>
>

As FF states when you install a Theme/Extension/Plugin, you are
accepting what you are installing. It comes down to the user. At least
that way you can't blame anyone but yourself. But with ActiveX and all
the other convenient features IE implemented, it would install just
about anything without your knowledge. Of course that is slowly being
fixed but I'm sure we will see many of the "features" that caused IE to
gain user share to be eliminated because of the security risks.


--
Terry

***Reply Note***
Anti-spam measures are included in my email address.
Delete NOSPAM from the email address after clicking Reply.
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
January 8, 2005 4:59:45 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

In article <40636632407327567235072@news.microsoft.com>,
steriley@microsoft.com says...
> Perhaps an important question to ask is: why do they need to learn?
>
> Why do web sites need to download software to my computer? Have we become
> so addicted to, um, "flashy" interactions that we are unsatisfied with basic
> delivery of reasonably-formatted text?
>
> I'm not intending to sound curmudgeonly here (but my 39th birthday is next
> month, so I'm permitted to, right?). I don't have all the answers to these
> questions, but they nag me. I'm certainly a believer in using the power of
> the Internet and software to make peoples' lives better and to accelerate
> business, but whatever happened to simple information delivery and consumption?

I suppose you didn't learn how to drive? I suppose you never read a
warning label on any product, or paid attention to any threat to your
security. I suppose you leave your bank-book on a bench outside your
house or your house unlocked when you leave?

It's about the same - they are tons of NASTY people out there, and the
internet brings them to your home if you are not careful. If people were
to just follow standard procedures for secure browsing and safe
computing, much like driving through unknown/hazardous areas, or
anything else that exposes them to harm, there would be a lot less
problems.

--
--
spamfree999@rrohio.com
(Remove 999 to reply to me)
Anonymous
a b 8 Security
January 9, 2005 2:27:44 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.security_admin (More info?)

What disturbs me is how fashionable it's become to blame the victim. Computers
have gotten very powerful, they can do a lot -- but most people use them
only for a little. The Internet is arguably the most complex thing (perhaps
aside from the space station) ever built by humans. The intersection of a
powerful thing with a complex environment leads to, well, chaos, and I'm
not sure that typical analogies like driving cars (which is a popular one,
no slam against your reply intended) really help to understand or frame the
problem.

Like I said, I don't have many answers, but it's something I think about
because right now my gut tells me that ordinary users have to know waaaaay
too much about the bowels of their computers and the Internet to keep themselves
protected.

Steve Riley
steriley@microsoft.com



> In article <40636632407327567235072@news.microsoft.com>,
> steriley@microsoft.com says...
>
>> Perhaps an important question to ask is: why do they need to learn?
>>
>> Why do web sites need to download software to my computer? Have we
>> become so addicted to, um, "flashy" interactions that we are
>> unsatisfied with basic delivery of reasonably-formatted text?
>>
>> I'm not intending to sound curmudgeonly here (but my 39th birthday is
>> next month, so I'm permitted to, right?). I don't have all the
>> answers to these questions, but they nag me. I'm certainly a believer
>> in using the power of the Internet and software to make peoples'
>> lives better and to accelerate business, but whatever happened to
>> simple information delivery and consumption?
>>
> I suppose you didn't learn how to drive? I suppose you never read a
> warning label on any product, or paid attention to any threat to your
> security. I suppose you leave your bank-book on a bench outside your
> house or your house unlocked when you leave?
>
> It's about the same - they are tons of NASTY people out there, and the
> internet brings them to your home if you are not careful. If people
> were to just follow standard procedures for secure browsing and safe
> computing, much like driving through unknown/hazardous areas, or
> anything else that exposes them to harm, there would be a lot less
> problems.
>
!