Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in
Your question

[Make Sticky]: The lowest PSUs I recommend enthusiasts use:

Last response: in Components
Share
December 9, 2006 6:36:14 PM

The lowest PSUs I recommend enthusiasts use:

Assuming you may want to SLI 2 x GeForce 8800 GTS, or Crossfire 2 x Radeon X1900 XT (or other equal 'power consumption wise', even better performing cards released in the future) at any stage using your original purchase PSU (and perhaps Video Card) then read on:

The goal of this is to buy one PSU, and keep it for 2-3 years, if not 5+ years without it failing and having it last many upgrades (so it is more cost effective - over time - than several PSU purcahses).

* - And very cost effective if it saves you from a damaged mainboard, video card and/or RAM after the warranty has expired on the part.

PSUs lose about 20% to 30% of their efficiency over 3-5 years, which can really play havoc with the 12V lines.

It is often too low wattage on the 12V lines which is why "550+ watt PSUs" are 'generally' recommended.
Above are the two key reasons why many recommend just "a decent 550+ watt PSU".

However, to serve as a more specific "a decent PSU, that is cost effective",
The lowest PSUs I recommend people use follow:
- Antec TruePower Trio 650 Watt,
- HEC GroupSigma 650 Watt
- Seasonic S12 Energy Plus 650 Watt
- Coolmax CW-650T
- Hiper HPU-4M670 (670W)
- Mushkin XP-650
- Seasonic SS-650HT 650W
- Thermaltake PurePower 680W (W0049RU)
- Any SLI or Crossfire Certified CWT PSU of at least 620W
These PSUs are either on the nVidia SLI Certified list, or ATI Crossfire Certified list - or both lists - meaning they are very good PSUs for the price with good 12V outputs and should last at least 3 years without problems.

[Made it short, so people will read it]

Any others that are SLI and/or Crossfire (or both) Certified, and at least 620 Watts (sustained, not peak - so generally 650 watts) should be added to this list over time.

Please do not add PSUs that are not SLI Certified, and/or Crossfire Certified.

PSUs that are both SLI Certified and Crossfire Certified should be marked as such, pref in bold and dark blue.
December 9, 2006 7:47:37 PM

Quote:


The goal of this is to buy one PSU, and keep it for 2-3 years, if not 5+ years without it failing and having it last many upgrades (so it is more cost effective - over time - than several PSU purcahses).

* - And very cost effective if it saves you from a damaged mainboard, video card and/or RAM after the warranty has expired on the part.

[ - Any SLI or Crossfire Certified CWT PSU of at least 620W


Personally, I'd go for a minimum of 750wts for the upcoming DX10 systems, especially since I like a psu to last a long time without having to replace it. I get tired of people who want to recommend the smallest psu around that will technically power a system without any consideration to future upgrades, wear on the capacitators, overclocking, and anything else that might require higher power.

So someone saves $20.00-50.00 on the smaller psu, and maybe 50 cents a month buying a minimal psu. Have to replace the $150.00 psu after the new graphics card has been put in with a psu that costs $200.00 and how much money has really been saved? Not to mention the time spent putting the new psu into the machine. OK, so I'm a bit lazy. I like to do something once and then forget about it.

That's not mentioning the other possible costs, as you siad, like the mobo, ram, etc that might bite it if and when a psu fails. Just not worth it to me.
December 9, 2006 8:05:32 PM

Links:
http://www.slizone.com/object/slizone_build_psu.html#ce...
http://ati.amd.com/technology/crossfire/buildyourown2.h...
http://users.on.net/~darkpeace/psu/List_of_Recommended_...

Stick to the certified lists above, and you'll make the perfect choice, first time, every time. If not go one level (+41.43%) higher wattage than you think you need, it'll last you through more upgrades and reduce chances of problems when the PSU is 3+ years old.

I fully agree with going even higher, my personal estimates are around 880 watts, and beyond that we'll get more efficient designs at the same wattage. There are very few configurations that'll need 880 watt PSUs (of today, aged by 5 years), in 5 years time.

To me there are 4 main classes of PSU
- To weak PSUs, that will fail within 3 years
- Quality 450 watt PSUs
- Quality 620+ watt PSUs
- High Quality 880 watt PSUs
December 9, 2006 10:25:20 PM

If it doesn't get sticky, no loss. Just no 'ultimate gain' either.

Need to build it over time, and add up to date manufacturer URLs, and rough prices, etc
December 10, 2006 2:53:57 AM

And what exactly qualifies you of all people to be the forum's PSU expert?
December 10, 2006 4:09:56 AM

Quote:
And what exactly qualifies you of all people to be the forum's PSU expert?


he is pretty salty on powersupplies.

in other words he knows what he is talking about.
December 10, 2006 4:51:47 AM

Umm you don't get to chose if it gets stickied or not, the mods do.

SLI DX9 cards(excluding the 7950GX2) or a single DX10 card needs at least 600 watts or more and SLI DX10 (and 7950GX2) needs at least 750watts or more.
December 10, 2006 6:04:46 AM

A 650 watt power supply? Perhaps if everyone in the world using a computer was a gamer with more money than sensibility it would be a good idea. How 'bout for enthusiasts who don't game, but still have hig performance CPUs, ram, and mobos, but just middle ofthe road graphics cards (you know, the video guys)? As for my K6-2, I think I'll stick with the 145 watt unit.
!