XP and Windows SE dual boot

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on setting up
a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I should know about
before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.

Thanks
7 answers Last reply
More about windows dual boot
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Each operating system needs to be installed on its own
    individual partition.

    Multibooting with Windows XP: Introduction
    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/setup/learnmore/multiboot.mspx

    HOW TO: Create a Multiple-Boot System in Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;306559&Product=winxp

    How do I install Windows 98/Me after I've installed XP?
    http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_repair_9x.htm

    A good third-party partitioning program is Partition Magic 8.
    http://www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic/

    --
    Carey Frisch
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows XP - Shell/User

    Be Smart! Protect Your PC!
    http://www.microsoft.com/athome/security/protect/default.aspx

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    "The Truth" wrote:

    | Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on setting up
    | a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I should know about
    | before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.
    |
    | Thanks
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    The Truth wrote:
    > Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on setting up
    > a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I should know about
    > before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >


    The simplest way I've found to dual boot between Win9x/Me and WinXP
    would be to partition your drive(s) roughly as follows:

    C: Primary FAT32 Win9x/Me/Legacy Apps
    D: Extended NTFS WinXP/Modern Apps

    Adjust the partition sizes according to your actual hard drive(s)
    size and the amount of space you'd like to allocate to each OS and its
    applications.

    Create the partitions using Win9x's FDISK so you can enable large
    disk support (FAT32). (No need for 3rd party partitioning
    utilities/boot managers and their frequent complications.)

    Install Win9x/Me first, being sure to select "C:\Windows" (or
    D:\Windows, if you prefer) when asked for the default Windows
    directory. When you subsequently install WinXP, be sure to specify
    "D:\Winnt" (or "D:\Windows," "C:\Winnt" as referred/applicable) when
    asked for the default Windows directory, to place it in the other
    partition. The WinXP installation routine will automatically set up a
    Multi-boot menu for you. The default settings for this menu can be
    readily edited from within WinXP. NOTE: If you elect to place
    Win9x/Me on the "D:" drive, you'll _have_ to leave the "C:" drive as
    FAT32.

    This method can be adapted to using 2 physical hard drives by
    placing the boot partition (C:, which still must be FAT32) and either
    of the operating systems on the Primary Master hard drive, and the
    second operating system on the second hard drive.

    It is also possible to have a 3rd partition for shared
    applications, but it would be necessary for such a partition to be
    formatted in the common file format (FAT32). The applications would
    also have to be installed into each OS (to ensure proper system file
    placement and registry updates), one at a time, but the bulk of the
    program files could be located on this common partition. I do not,
    however, actually recommend doing this as, if you were to uninstall
    such an application from one OS, you may not be able to gracefully
    uninstall it from the second OS, having already deleted crucial
    installation data during the first uninstall action.

    Just about everything you need to know (URLs may wrap):

    http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q217/2/10.ASP

    http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/pro/using/howto/gettingstarted/multiboot.asp


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Dual boot can be unstable and when something goes wrong it is very
    frustrating to fix. Back ups of both partitions are essential.

    Another approach would be Microsoft Virtual PC 2004. It was written to do
    away with the need for dual booting or separate hardware.

    VPC will run on XP Home but is not supported by Microsoft (phone help, etc).
    Nevertheless, under VPC you could run a Win98 computer in a window on your
    XP desktop. You can download a trial version of VPC and try it out before
    committing, since if the Win98 apps don't run to your satisfaction, you can
    simply delete the Win98 computer like you would any other file. You should
    be running at least 384MB ram in order to allow 128mb or more for the Win98
    guest computer.

    A real plus is that you could do the same thing with Linux and other Windows
    versions, all on the same computer. I presently have several dozen virtual
    machines available on my XP Pro system. Since I have lots of memory and a
    fast processor I sometimes run several at the some time. It is nice to stay
    in XP and Win98 at the same time instead of having to reboot.


    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    "The Truth" <truth@Elkestr.com> wrote in message
    news:eGP5eGb9EHA.2540@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on setting
    > up
    > a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I should know about
    > before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Hi, Truth.

    No need for a whole article, really. It's quite simple, when you are
    starting from scratch.

    Step 1: Install Win9x/ME.

    Step 2: Install WinXP into a second partition.

    Done! WinXP Setup will have detected the existing Win9x/ME and created all
    you need for dual-booting. :<)

    But, if you are not starting from scratch, or if you are installing non-MS
    operating systems (such as Linux), then it can get a lot more complicated.
    :>( Or, it may be only slightly more difficult than starting from scratch,
    IF your existing Drive C: is formatted FATxx.

    Remember that Win9x/ME can't read, write, boot from or even SEE an NTFS
    volume. From this basic fact, several other rules naturally follow: The
    System Partition (the Active partition on the first physical HD, almost
    always Drive C:) must be FAT, otherwise Win9x/ME can't boot at all, no
    matter which volume you try to install it into. Win9x/ME's boot volume must
    be FAT. Any volume holding files that you want to access from Win9x/ME must
    be FAT.

    Since you already have only WinXP installed, your Drive C: probably is
    formatted NTFS. To install Win98, you will need to convert Drive C: to FAT.
    But Microsoft provides no way to do this. Convert.exe is a one-way street:
    It converts FAT to NTFS, but not vice-versa. That leaves you with only two
    choices:
    1. Invest your time: backup; reformat; restore, or
    2. Invest your money: buy Partition Magic or some similar program which
    will convert NTFS to FAT

    If Drive C: is FAT, then you may be able to simply install Win98 into any
    FAT volume in your computer that does not already hold WinXP. This will
    leave you able to boot into Win98, but unable to boot into WinXP. That's
    easily fixed, though, by booting from the WinXP CD-ROM and running the
    Recovery Console's FixBoot and BootCfg commands.

    To recap: To install dual-boot into a new computer is easy. To add
    Win9x/ME to a computer that has WinXP already installed usually is possible,
    but it can be a real headache.

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX
    rc@corridor.net
    Microsoft Windows MVP

    "The Truth" <truth@Elkestr.com> wrote in message
    news:eGP5eGb9EHA.2540@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    > Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on setting
    > up
    > a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I should know about
    > before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.
    >
    > Thanks
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Do NOT attempt to install Win98 if XP is already in place. You should
    install the earlier operating system first and then the newer one.

    --
    Colin Barnhorst [MVP Windows - Virtual Machine]
    "R. C. White" <rc@corridor.net> wrote in message
    news:ONjaHwd9EHA.3820@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
    > Hi, Truth.
    >
    > No need for a whole article, really. It's quite simple, when you are
    > starting from scratch.
    >
    > Step 1: Install Win9x/ME.
    >
    > Step 2: Install WinXP into a second partition.
    >
    > Done! WinXP Setup will have detected the existing Win9x/ME and created
    > all you need for dual-booting. :<)
    >
    > But, if you are not starting from scratch, or if you are installing non-MS
    > operating systems (such as Linux), then it can get a lot more complicated.
    > :>( Or, it may be only slightly more difficult than starting from
    > scratch, IF your existing Drive C: is formatted FATxx.
    >
    > Remember that Win9x/ME can't read, write, boot from or even SEE an NTFS
    > volume. From this basic fact, several other rules naturally follow: The
    > System Partition (the Active partition on the first physical HD, almost
    > always Drive C:) must be FAT, otherwise Win9x/ME can't boot at all, no
    > matter which volume you try to install it into. Win9x/ME's boot volume
    > must be FAT. Any volume holding files that you want to access from
    > Win9x/ME must be FAT.
    >
    > Since you already have only WinXP installed, your Drive C: probably is
    > formatted NTFS. To install Win98, you will need to convert Drive C: to
    > FAT. But Microsoft provides no way to do this. Convert.exe is a one-way
    > street: It converts FAT to NTFS, but not vice-versa. That leaves you with
    > only two choices:
    > 1. Invest your time: backup; reformat; restore, or
    > 2. Invest your money: buy Partition Magic or some similar program which
    > will convert NTFS to FAT
    >
    > If Drive C: is FAT, then you may be able to simply install Win98 into any
    > FAT volume in your computer that does not already hold WinXP. This will
    > leave you able to boot into Win98, but unable to boot into WinXP. That's
    > easily fixed, though, by booting from the WinXP CD-ROM and running the
    > Recovery Console's FixBoot and BootCfg commands.
    >
    > To recap: To install dual-boot into a new computer is easy. To add
    > Win9x/ME to a computer that has WinXP already installed usually is
    > possible, but it can be a real headache.
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    > rc@corridor.net
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    >
    > "The Truth" <truth@Elkestr.com> wrote in message
    > news:eGP5eGb9EHA.2540@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
    >> Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on setting
    >> up
    >> a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I should know about
    >> before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.
    >>
    >> Thanks
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    The Truth wrote:
    > Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on
    > setting up a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I
    > should know about before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.

    As others have mentioned, installing 98SE after XP can cause problems. But
    it should be doable. The major pitfalls are (in order): Repartitioning,
    which can cause havoc on your system if you do not know what you are doing
    and/or if you are unlucky (remember backups!), and boot loaders.

    Windows 98 SE needs its own FAT32 partition. So you will need to have some
    free space on one of your hard drives. This partition also needs to be a
    primary partition rather than a logical partition, and it will also have to
    be set to bootable from a suitable partition editor. If you can delete any
    of your current partitions, or if you have free space, then this should be
    no problem. If you need to resize any of your current partitions you will
    need third party software, such as Partition Magic or Ghost.

    The 98SE installer requires that the hard drive it is going to be installed
    to is your primary master. This means that if your drive is _not_ then you
    will have to physically rewire your drives during installation. Also, to
    actually be able to run 98SE from anything but the primary master you will
    need a boot loader that can logically swap the internal drives. LILO can do
    this, other boot loaders I can not vouch for.

    Even if you only wish to use the normal NT boot loader (which should be fine
    for most cases), remember that the 98SE installation will overwrite any MBR
    with it's own. To correct this you can use the XP installation CD, enter the
    recovery console and type the command 'fixmbr'. Then you should alter your
    c:\boot.ini to include your Windows 98SE installation. Of course, you can
    use any other boot loader if you wish.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    Thanks to all for the info., and suggestions. You've make my decision much
    easier.

    Truth\

    "André Gulliksen" <andre.gulliksen@start.no> wrote in message
    news:34dcdcF49q8cvU1@individual.net...
    > The Truth wrote:
    > > Can anyone point me in the right direction of a how-to article on
    > > setting up a XP/W98se dual boot? Also, are there any pitfalls I
    > > should know about before hand. My current OS is the XP Home Edition.
    >
    > As others have mentioned, installing 98SE after XP can cause problems. But
    > it should be doable. The major pitfalls are (in order): Repartitioning,
    > which can cause havoc on your system if you do not know what you are doing
    > and/or if you are unlucky (remember backups!), and boot loaders.
    >
    > Windows 98 SE needs its own FAT32 partition. So you will need to have some
    > free space on one of your hard drives. This partition also needs to be a
    > primary partition rather than a logical partition, and it will also have
    to
    > be set to bootable from a suitable partition editor. If you can delete any
    > of your current partitions, or if you have free space, then this should be
    > no problem. If you need to resize any of your current partitions you will
    > need third party software, such as Partition Magic or Ghost.
    >
    > The 98SE installer requires that the hard drive it is going to be
    installed
    > to is your primary master. This means that if your drive is _not_ then you
    > will have to physically rewire your drives during installation. Also, to
    > actually be able to run 98SE from anything but the primary master you will
    > need a boot loader that can logically swap the internal drives. LILO can
    do
    > this, other boot loaders I can not vouch for.
    >
    > Even if you only wish to use the normal NT boot loader (which should be
    fine
    > for most cases), remember that the 98SE installation will overwrite any
    MBR
    > with it's own. To correct this you can use the XP installation CD, enter
    the
    > recovery console and type the command 'fixmbr'. Then you should alter your
    > c:\boot.ini to include your Windows 98SE installation. Of course, you can
    > use any other boot loader if you wish.
    >
    >
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