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win2000 makes files readonly on CD

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Anonymous
March 14, 2005 12:54:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Hello!
I am puzzled by this phenomen:
When I burn under win2000 a non-readonly file on CD, the file turns out to
be readonly on CD (anyway: apparently). And, worse, copied back to hard
disk, it becomes definitely readonly.
Now the rest of the puzzle:
When I look to the very same CD in a winXP system, I see readonlies on CD,
just like under 2000. But.... copied back to harddisk the readonlies have
been disappeared!
So it seems to me that w2000 writes some code on CD, by which w2000 sees the
CD files as readonly, and which makes the file definitely readonly after
copying to hd. XP sees also the code, but leaves all readonly attributes
unchanged after copying.
People of XP say to me: I don't see all files on my CD 's as readonly.
So XP does not make this code on the CD, but it can read it.
Am I right? Thanks very much for a better explanation!
Jan
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 12:54:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

There is no magic involved. All data written to a CD is by nature read-only.
There are ways to inhibit the read-only attribute temporarily when using packet
writing software, but the data will be read-only when the disc is closed
(finalized).

All Windows versions previous to WinXP will transfer the read-only attribute
along with the file when using Windows Explorer.

If you want to transfer files without this attribute use the xcopy utility.

"Jan Janssen" <j.janssen@forget.it> wrote in message
news:%23hpsfNHKFHA.1176@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Hello!
> I am puzzled by this phenomen:
> When I burn under win2000 a non-readonly file on CD, the file turns out to
> be readonly on CD (anyway: apparently). And, worse, copied back to hard
> disk, it becomes definitely readonly.
> Now the rest of the puzzle:
> When I look to the very same CD in a winXP system, I see readonlies on CD,
> just like under 2000. But.... copied back to harddisk the readonlies have
> been disappeared!
> So it seems to me that w2000 writes some code on CD, by which w2000 sees the
> CD files as readonly, and which makes the file definitely readonly after
> copying to hd. XP sees also the code, but leaves all readonly attributes
> unchanged after copying.
> People of XP say to me: I don't see all files on my CD 's as readonly.
> So XP does not make this code on the CD, but it can read it.
> Am I right? Thanks very much for a better explanation!
> Jan
>
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 12:54:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

If you don't want it to be read only then use CD-RW disks.

Since a CD-R is a write once/read only device you are limited in options

One thing you can do to get around this, after copying a folder or lots of
folders to a hard drive just issue the DOS command

attrib +R *.* /s

in the subdirectory in which you have copied the read only files, that will
turn it off on all files as well as all subdirectories.

"Jan Janssen" wrote:

> Hello!
> I am puzzled by this phenomen:
> When I burn under win2000 a non-readonly file on CD, the file turns out to
> be readonly on CD (anyway: apparently). And, worse, copied back to hard
> disk, it becomes definitely readonly.
> Now the rest of the puzzle:
> When I look to the very same CD in a winXP system, I see readonlies on CD,
> just like under 2000. But.... copied back to harddisk the readonlies have
> been disappeared!
> So it seems to me that w2000 writes some code on CD, by which w2000 sees the
> CD files as readonly, and which makes the file definitely readonly after
> copying to hd. XP sees also the code, but leaves all readonly attributes
> unchanged after copying.
> People of XP say to me: I don't see all files on my CD 's as readonly.
> So XP does not make this code on the CD, but it can read it.
> Am I right? Thanks very much for a better explanation!
> Jan
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 2:42:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

JeffM,

Merely changing over to CD-RW discs does not help in itself. One must use packet
writing software and leave the disc open (not finalized), which then makes it
unusable on a non-burning drive until it is closed (and the files are then
read-only). The use of CD-RW discs will still yield the read-only attribute on
files when mastering software is use.

The correct command to remove the read-only attribute(s) is: attrib -r *.* /s

The +r switch will add it.

"JeffM" <jeffm@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:437062CC-32F4-4125-82CD-B871DFF43A3A@microsoft.com...
> If you don't want it to be read only then use CD-RW disks.
>
> Since a CD-R is a write once/read only device you are limited in options
>
> One thing you can do to get around this, after copying a folder or lots of
> folders to a hard drive just issue the DOS command
>
> attrib +R *.* /s
>
> in the subdirectory in which you have copied the read only files, that will
> turn it off on all files as well as all subdirectories.
>
> "Jan Janssen" wrote:
>
> > Hello!
> > I am puzzled by this phenomen:
> > When I burn under win2000 a non-readonly file on CD, the file turns out to
> > be readonly on CD (anyway: apparently). And, worse, copied back to hard
> > disk, it becomes definitely readonly.
> > Now the rest of the puzzle:
> > When I look to the very same CD in a winXP system, I see readonlies on CD,
> > just like under 2000. But.... copied back to harddisk the readonlies have
> > been disappeared!
> > So it seems to me that w2000 writes some code on CD, by which w2000 sees the
> > CD files as readonly, and which makes the file definitely readonly after
> > copying to hd. XP sees also the code, but leaves all readonly attributes
> > unchanged after copying.
> > People of XP say to me: I don't see all files on my CD 's as readonly.
> > So XP does not make this code on the CD, but it can read it.
> > Am I right? Thanks very much for a better explanation!
> > Jan
> >
> >
Anonymous
March 14, 2005 10:00:06 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

It's not Win2K, your CD burning software that does that, especially Nero.
Adaptec Direct CD/Easy CD doesn't do that, even on CDRs.

First, if you've ever used Adaptec on your PC, use the CleanPack cleaner
from the Nero website to get rid of all traces of eg Adaptec drivers esp.
CDRal.dll and CDRalW2k.dll
Reboot.

To take Read Only off a whole batch of Files open a Command Prompt window,
(Start/Programs/Accessories)
To get to the correct drive type eg
D:
at the command prompt to get to the D drive
To get to the folder that has your ReadOnly files, type eg
cd MyFolder
(To move up a level type cd..)
When you get to the folder type
Attrib -r /s *.*

This will take the Read Only off all files in the folder and its subfolders
except for Hidden files (like Windows system files).



Evi










"Jan Janssen" <j.janssen@forget.it> wrote in message
news:%23hpsfNHKFHA.1176@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Hello!
> I am puzzled by this phenomen:
> When I burn under win2000 a non-readonly file on CD, the file turns out to
> be readonly on CD (anyway: apparently). And, worse, copied back to hard
> disk, it becomes definitely readonly.
> Now the rest of the puzzle:
> When I look to the very same CD in a winXP system, I see readonlies on CD,
> just like under 2000. But.... copied back to harddisk the reado.nlies have
> been disappeared!
> So it seems to me that w2000 writes some code on CD, by which w2000 sees
the
> CD files as readonly, and which makes the file definitely readonly after
> copying to hd. XP sees also the code, but leaves all readonly attributes
> unchanged after copying.
> People of XP say to me: I don't see all files on my CD 's as readonly.
> So XP does not make this code on the CD, but it can read it.
> Am I right? Thanks very much for a better explanation!
> Jan
>
Anonymous
March 15, 2005 1:53:06 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

> It's not Win2K, your CD burning software that does that, especially Nero.
> Adaptec Direct CD/Easy CD doesn't do that, even on CDRs.
>
> First, if you've ever used Adaptec on your PC, use the CleanPack cleaner
> from the Nero website to get rid of all traces of eg Adaptec drivers esp.
> CDRal.dll and CDRalW2k.dll
> Reboot.
>
> To take Read Only off a whole batch of Files open a Command Prompt window,
> (Start/Programs/Accessories)
> To get to the correct drive type eg
> D:
> at the command prompt to get to the D drive
> To get to the folder that has your ReadOnly files, type eg
> cd MyFolder
> (To move up a level type cd..)
> When you get to the folder type
> Attrib -r /s *.*
>
> This will take the Read Only off all files in the folder and its
subfolders
> except for Hidden files (like Windows system files).
>
>
>
> Evi

Hi everybody,
I am glad with your reactions, but I 'm afraid my question was not clear.
I know how to remove read-onlies. The problem is that I do not understand
the mechanism.
I burn files (with NO read-only) to a CD with Nero on a win2k machine.
After that it _seems_ that all files have definitely become read-only.
So, we think in 2000: files on this CD are read-only, and we can "prove"
that by copying them to harddisk. Read-only there.

Now: I put the _very same CD_ in a XP machine, and copy to harddisk, and
what do you see? No read-only. So now I "prove" that the file was NOT
read-only.
So I am confused now!
Rgds,
Jan

> > Hello!
> > I am puzzled by this phenomen:
> > When I burn under win2000 a non-readonly file on CD, the file turns out
to
> > be readonly on CD (anyway: apparently). And, worse, copied back to hard
> > disk, it becomes definitely readonly.
> > Now the rest of the puzzle:
> > When I look to the very same CD in a winXP system, I see readonlies on
CD,
> > just like under 2000. But.... copied back to harddisk the reado.nlies
have
> > been disappeared!
> > So it seems to me that w2000 writes some code on CD, by which w2000 sees
> the
> > CD files as readonly, and which makes the file definitely readonly after
> > copying to hd. XP sees also the code, but leaves all readonly attributes
> > unchanged after copying.
> > People of XP say to me: I don't see all files on my CD 's as readonly.
> > So XP does not make this code on the CD, but it can read it.
> > Am I right? Thanks very much for a better explanation!
> > Jan
> >
>
>
Anonymous
March 18, 2005 10:37:26 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

"Jan Janssen" <j.janssen@forget.it> wrote in
news:o Lix2AOKFHA.4032@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl:

> I burn files (with NO read-only) to a CD with Nero on a win2k machine.
> After that it _seems_ that all files have definitely become read-only.
> So, we think in 2000: files on this CD are read-only, and we can
> "prove" that by copying them to harddisk. Read-only there.
>
> Now: I put the _very same CD_ in a XP machine, and copy to harddisk,
> and what do you see? No read-only. So now I "prove" that the file was
> NOT read-only.

I was under the (mistaken?) impression that under Win2K when you copied
files off of a CD-ROM they were marked as RO since they're technically RO
on the CD. (i.e. You can't write to a fixed media.) And I thought they
changed that behaviour under WinXP, since users were constantly wondering
why they couldn't save a new version of a document they copied off a CD.

So it has nothing to do with how you're burning the CD, it's that you're
copying from a CD that marks the resultant files as RO.

But I may be delusional. :) 
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 1:30:57 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

> > I burn files (with NO read-only) to a CD with Nero on a win2k machine.
> > After that it _seems_ that all files have definitely become read-only.
> > So, we think in 2000: files on this CD are read-only, and we can
> > "prove" that by copying them to harddisk. Read-only there.
> >
> > Now: I put the _very same CD_ in a XP machine, and copy to harddisk,
> > and what do you see? No read-only. So now I "prove" that the file was
> > NOT read-only.
>
> I was under the (mistaken?) impression that under Win2K when you copied
> files off of a CD-ROM they were marked as RO since they're technically RO
> on the CD. (i.e. You can't write to a fixed media.) And I thought they
> changed that behaviour under WinXP, since users were constantly wondering
> why they couldn't save a new version of a document they copied off a CD.
>
> So it has nothing to do with how you're burning the CD, it's that you're
> copying from a CD that marks the resultant files as RO.
>
> But I may be delusional. :) 

I think we do agree.
It must be the copying process from CD to hard disk, which is different in
XP from all previous versions.
In the XP copying process the file is left intact, but in win2k and previous
the readonly attribute is apparently hard coded into the file header.
What on earth made the microsoft boys to arrange it this way, that's what me
puzzles. You too?
Rgds,
Jan
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 1:30:58 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

You must have missed my initial response where I cited WinXP's behavior.
Actually, I'm told that this was a fix in the SP2 update for WinXP.

As I stated previously, if you use xcopy to transfer the files, the read-only
attribute is removed in the process.

"Jan Janssen" <j.janssen@forget.it> wrote in message
news:uNnoEjfLFHA.1396@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > > I burn files (with NO read-only) to a CD with Nero on a win2k machine.
> > > After that it _seems_ that all files have definitely become read-only.
> > > So, we think in 2000: files on this CD are read-only, and we can
> > > "prove" that by copying them to harddisk. Read-only there.
> > >
> > > Now: I put the _very same CD_ in a XP machine, and copy to harddisk,
> > > and what do you see? No read-only. So now I "prove" that the file was
> > > NOT read-only.
> >
> > I was under the (mistaken?) impression that under Win2K when you copied
> > files off of a CD-ROM they were marked as RO since they're technically RO
> > on the CD. (i.e. You can't write to a fixed media.) And I thought they
> > changed that behaviour under WinXP, since users were constantly wondering
> > why they couldn't save a new version of a document they copied off a CD.
> >
> > So it has nothing to do with how you're burning the CD, it's that you're
> > copying from a CD that marks the resultant files as RO.
> >
> > But I may be delusional. :) 
>
> I think we do agree.
> It must be the copying process from CD to hard disk, which is different in
> XP from all previous versions.
> In the XP copying process the file is left intact, but in win2k and previous
> the readonly attribute is apparently hard coded into the file header.
> What on earth made the microsoft boys to arrange it this way, that's what me
> puzzles. You too?
> Rgds,
> Jan
>
Anonymous
March 21, 2005 6:26:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

> You must have missed my initial response where I cited WinXP's behavior.
> Actually, I'm told that this was a fix in the SP2 update for WinXP.
>
> As I stated previously, if you use xcopy to transfer the files, the
read-only
> attribute is removed in the process.
>
Thank you, I got it!
Jan

> "Jan Janssen" <j.janssen@forget.it> wrote in message
> news:uNnoEjfLFHA.1396@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> > > > I burn files (with NO read-only) to a CD with Nero on a win2k
machine.
> > > > After that it _seems_ that all files have definitely become
read-only.
> > > > So, we think in 2000: files on this CD are read-only, and we can
> > > > "prove" that by copying them to harddisk. Read-only there.
> > > >
> > > > Now: I put the _very same CD_ in a XP machine, and copy to harddisk,
> > > > and what do you see? No read-only. So now I "prove" that the file
was
> > > > NOT read-only.
> > >
> > > I was under the (mistaken?) impression that under Win2K when you
copied
> > > files off of a CD-ROM they were marked as RO since they're technically
RO
> > > on the CD. (i.e. You can't write to a fixed media.) And I thought
they
> > > changed that behaviour under WinXP, since users were constantly
wondering
> > > why they couldn't save a new version of a document they copied off a
CD.
> > >
> > > So it has nothing to do with how you're burning the CD, it's that
you're
> > > copying from a CD that marks the resultant files as RO.
> > >
> > > But I may be delusional. :) 
> >
> > I think we do agree.
> > It must be the copying process from CD to hard disk, which is different
in
> > XP from all previous versions.
> > In the XP copying process the file is left intact, but in win2k and
previous
> > the readonly attribute is apparently hard coded into the file header.
> > What on earth made the microsoft boys to arrange it this way, that's
what me
> > puzzles. You too?
> > Rgds,
> > Jan
> >
>
>
!