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Change COM port

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Anonymous
January 13, 2005 11:04:24 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

My SmithMicro HotFax software doesn't find the COM
port any more, since I upgraded to SP2. I'd like to
try changing port. Please give me a sequence.

More about : change port

Anonymous
January 14, 2005 2:14:39 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Version 6 of that program adapts to the modem so presumably you are using an
older version.. is there nowhere in the program that allows you to change
the com port being used?

--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/user



"William B. Lurie" <billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
news:%23613DUd%23EHA.2316@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> My SmithMicro HotFax software doesn't find the COM
> port any more, since I upgraded to SP2. I'd like to
> try changing port. Please give me a sequence.
>
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 9:32:42 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Mike Hall wrote:
> Version 6 of that program adapts to the modem so presumably you are using an
> older version.. is there nowhere in the program that allows you to change
> the com port being used?
>
No, Mike, I recently bought their upgraded HFMC. I fully
uninstalled Version 6, and now I am waiting for them to
tell me how to change the COM port being used. In the same
vein, is there no way in XP/SP2 to change the COM port
being used?
Related resources
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 10:03:47 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Should it not be set for the same com port that the modem is operating
under?

That can be found in device manager/modem/advanced settings. See if they are
the same.

--
Regards,

Richard Urban

aka Crusty (-: Old B@stard :-)

If you knew as much as you thought you know,
You would realize that you don't know what you thought you knew!


"William B. Lurie" <billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
news:%23613DUd%23EHA.2316@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> My SmithMicro HotFax software doesn't find the COM
> port any more, since I upgraded to SP2. I'd like to
> try changing port. Please give me a sequence.
>
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 11:27:21 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Richard Urban wrote:
> Should it not be set for the same com port that the modem is operating
> under?
>
> That can be found in device manager/modem/advanced settings. See if they are
> the same.
>
I do have the warning yellow triangle and ! telling me that
there is a problem under device manager, Ports>>Communication
Port (COM1)
Device mgr>modem>advanced tab>advanced port settings>>>COM Port 3 for
the modem is what shows.....
If I were to change it, I see that COM1 is marked as (in use).
I presume that to be the mouse.
But Control Panel>>Mouse>>hardware>>properties, etcetera, doesn't
tell me what port the PS2 mouse is on, so I can't tell me
if they are the same. In olden days' systems, there used
to be a table of COM and IRQ to tell what was on each.


--
William B. Lurie
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 1:09:16 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Bill

Traditionally, COM 1 was indeed the 'mouse' port.. serial mice worked better
on COM 1 than COM 2, sometimes because COM 2 was of the 25 pin D type (not
always though.. it is not unusual to see two 9 pin connections), and mice
were 9 pin.. also, external modems of the day (they still are) were fitted
with 25 pin D type connectors.. other devices could also be connected to COM
2, serial printers etc.. Direct Cable Connection also brought about a use
for the 25 pin serial port known as COM 2.. but that was then and this is
now.. serial port connections for most home users are a thing of the past,
at least the physical ports found on the back of most computers.. they are
there mainly for compatibility with older devices..

The mouse that you have connected is a PS2 mouse, so called because it is
connected to the (IBM) PS2 port (IRQ 12) allocated for mouse use.. there is
absolutely no physical connection to COM 1..

Internal modem installation programs select COM 3 for obvious reasons.. it
is generally the first free COM port after the two physical ports on the
backplate.. even if there is only one COM port there, the installation will
attempt to use COM 3.. if COM 3 is in use, it will select the next up..

So your modem is sitting on COM 3, and the Fax/Voice software should either
automatically find the modem, or you should be able to tell the software
which modem is in use.. most software of this type scans the COM ports
looking for a valid modem, finds it on COM 3, and then finalizes set up.. it
should work..

The fact that COM 1 seems to have a problem could be down to two things at
least.. the first is that there is a physical problem with it (unlikely), or
that the operator has attempted to force settings to make a device use COM
1.. what you might try doing is removing COM 1 from the configuration,
rebooting to let XP sort the problem for you..

Even if COM 1 has a problem, the modem and Fax software should work ok..

Re a table of IRQ allocations, I really can't see this of being any help to
you, especially as XP and modern systems are quite capable of sorting all
of these things without the any user interference..

IRQ 0 Timer channel 0 (May mean "no interrupt".)
IRQ 1 Keyboard
IRQ 2 Cascade for controller 2
IRQ 3 Serial port 2
IRQ 4 Serial port 1
IRQ 5 Parallel port 2, Sound card
IRQ 6 Floppy diskette
IRQ 7 Parallel port 1
IRQ 8 Real-time clock
IRQ 9 Redirected to IRQ2
IRQ 10 not assigned
IRQ 11 not assigned
IRQ 12 not assigned
IRQ 13 Math coprocessor
IRQ 14 Hard disk controller 1
IRQ 15 Hard disk controller 2




--
Mike Hall
MVP - Windows Shell/user



<billurie@nospam.org> wrote in message
news:eBzbMzj%23EHA.3592@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Richard Urban wrote:
>> Should it not be set for the same com port that the modem is operating
>> under?
>>
>> That can be found in device manager/modem/advanced settings. See if they
>> are the same.
>>
> I do have the warning yellow triangle and ! telling me that
> there is a problem under device manager, Ports>>Communication
> Port (COM1)
> Device mgr>modem>advanced tab>advanced port settings>>>COM Port 3 for
> the modem is what shows.....
> If I were to change it, I see that COM1 is marked as (in use).
> I presume that to be the mouse.
> But Control Panel>>Mouse>>hardware>>properties, etcetera, doesn't
> tell me what port the PS2 mouse is on, so I can't tell me
> if they are the same. In olden days' systems, there used
> to be a table of COM and IRQ to tell what was on each.
>
>
> --
> William B. Lurie
Anonymous
January 14, 2005 1:45:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Mike, other readers and of course I, do appreciate the complete
historical account of the COM ports. I remember the days going
back to DOS 6.22, when in connecting up a modem, it had to
be set, and sometimes jumpered, for appropriate COM port.

I interpret your advice to be saying that COM3 is assigned to the modem,
and the FAX software should find it automatically. Unfortunately,
HotFax does not come with a manual and their on-board Help doesn't
provide a way to solve the problem. I'm waiting for help from them
now.

It isn't impossible that some sort of anti-virus or firewall is
really what the problem is, but I've tried it with everything that
I can turn off, disabled, to no avail. So I'm on hold for now.
Thanks for your help.
WBL

Mike Hall wrote:
> Bill
>
> Traditionally, COM 1 was indeed the 'mouse' port.. serial mice worked better
> on COM 1 than COM 2, sometimes because COM 2 was of the 25 pin D type (not
> always though.. it is not unusual to see two 9 pin connections), and mice
> were 9 pin.. also, external modems of the day (they still are) were fitted
> with 25 pin D type connectors.. other devices could also be connected to COM
> 2, serial printers etc.. Direct Cable Connection also brought about a use
> for the 25 pin serial port known as COM 2.. but that was then and this is
> now.. serial port connections for most home users are a thing of the past,
> at least the physical ports found on the back of most computers.. they are
> there mainly for compatibility with older devices..
>
> The mouse that you have connected is a PS2 mouse, so called because it is
> connected to the (IBM) PS2 port (IRQ 12) allocated for mouse use.. there is
> absolutely no physical connection to COM 1..
>
> Internal modem installation programs select COM 3 for obvious reasons.. it
> is generally the first free COM port after the two physical ports on the
> backplate.. even if there is only one COM port there, the installation will
> attempt to use COM 3.. if COM 3 is in use, it will select the next up..
>
> So your modem is sitting on COM 3, and the Fax/Voice software should either
> automatically find the modem, or you should be able to tell the software
> which modem is in use.. most software of this type scans the COM ports
> looking for a valid modem, finds it on COM 3, and then finalizes set up.. it
> should work..
>
> The fact that COM 1 seems to have a problem could be down to two things at
> least.. the first is that there is a physical problem with it (unlikely), or
> that the operator has attempted to force settings to make a device use COM
> 1.. what you might try doing is removing COM 1 from the configuration,
> rebooting to let XP sort the problem for you..
>
> Even if COM 1 has a problem, the modem and Fax software should work ok..
>
> Re a table of IRQ allocations, I really can't see this of being any help to
> you, especially as XP and modern systems are quite capable of sorting all
> of these things without the any user interference..
>
> IRQ 0 Timer channel 0 (May mean "no interrupt".)
> IRQ 1 Keyboard
> IRQ 2 Cascade for controller 2
> IRQ 3 Serial port 2
> IRQ 4 Serial port 1
> IRQ 5 Parallel port 2, Sound card
> IRQ 6 Floppy diskette
> IRQ 7 Parallel port 1
> IRQ 8 Real-time clock
> IRQ 9 Redirected to IRQ2
> IRQ 10 not assigned
> IRQ 11 not assigned
> IRQ 12 not assigned
> IRQ 13 Math coprocessor
> IRQ 14 Hard disk controller 1
> IRQ 15 Hard disk controller 2
>
>
>
>
!