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Core 2 Duo - where's the Cool'n'Quiet equivalent?

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December 18, 2006 8:36:35 AM

Hi guys

I've been using AMD64 processors for the last couple of years and they feature the Cool'n'Quiet technology:

Quote:
Cool 'n' Quiet is a feature in AMD Athlon 64 that reduces the working frequency and Vcore when the processor is not under heavy load in order to lower the heat dissipation.


I've found it really useful as it drops the CPU temp by about 8 degrees when idling and reduces my guilt about leaving my main workstation on 24 hours a day.

I understand that Intel processors have a similar technology called SpeedStep, however I've not found the equivalent Windows utility to activate it and show me what's going on.

A little Googleing lead me to the RightMark CPU Clock Utility (see pic), when I activated the 'Power on Demand' profile it dropped my CPU temp by 5-7 degrees and doesn't seem to have any negative impact on performance (so far as I can tell). However, I was wondering if there was an official Intel utility that does the same thing at the kernel level?

Thanks

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a b K Overclocking
December 18, 2006 9:28:24 AM

enable EIST in Bios, and then apply the laptop/portable setting in windows, using TAT (thermal Analysis tool) you should see it drop from your upper multiplier x9 for 6600 (2.4Ghz) to x6 1.6Ghz. You only need to use TAT to observe it happening and convince yourself it is real. I've not had much luck personally with rightmark on C2D so far.
a b à CPUs
a b K Overclocking
December 18, 2006 11:29:03 AM

As far as I know, it is all done from power options in the control panel.
Switch it to portable/laptop mode and it will scale your cpu bact to a 6X multiplier when you are not under load.
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December 18, 2006 12:27:59 PM

I'm with the author on this. My AMD still runs cooler than my Core 2 Duo :( 

My AMD Athlon 64 3200 NewCastle 2.2GHz S754 idles at 30C and goes as high as 41C.

My Intel Core 2 Duo E6600 idles at 33-35C and loads up to about 50C.

Also, the AMD idles at 1.000 Volts whereas the Core 2 Duo idles at the lowest ~ 1.114V.

Why couldn't AMD release an Conroe killer when Conroes came out?! :oops: 

And no, I'm not a fanboy. I've just appreciated the performance that AMD offered at the reasonable price.

I like the best bang for my buck and Intel won. But on the Cool n Quiet. AMD :oops: 
December 18, 2006 1:08:11 PM

I already had EIST enable in BIOS so I applied the laptop/portable setting in the power control panel and monitored the results.

The temperature was reduced slightly when the multiplier dropped to 6x but no where near as much as when using the RightMark utility. I assume this is because the RightMark util is reducing the clock frequency too.

I was surprised to find that Intel don't have a dedicated utility/driver to do this for you.

I did notice that GigaByte have a similar (yet absolutely awful) utility on their website called iCool
December 18, 2006 1:59:07 PM

You also have to enable speedstep. Correct me if I'm wrong, but EIST just lowers the voltage when the CPU is idled :wink:
December 18, 2006 2:39:17 PM

Quote:
You also have to enable speedstep. Correct me if I'm wrong, but EIST just lowers the voltage when the CPU is idled :wink:


Sorry I think I must be missing a brain cell, I though having EIST enabled in BIOS and setting the appropriate power profile in Control Panel was the way to enable SpeedStep. Could you fill in the gaps and tell me what I should be doing?

I guess I was fooled by the acronym, doesn’t EIST stand for Enhanced Intel SpeedStep Technology?
December 18, 2006 2:47:35 PM

ThatDude has it correct. When EIST is inabled in BIOS & power profiles, VCORE & the cpu frequency multiplier drop under low load conditions.
December 18, 2006 3:15:56 PM

Yes - EIST or SpeedStep is the Intel Cool n' Quiet.
I would select 'Minimal Power Management' setting to enable it.
'Always On' setting will quickly disable it.
On my rig my multiplier is reduced to 6x, which of course will reduce the CPU speed.
Also, and more importantly, my CPU voltage is reduced to ~1.050V.
So I'm idling @ ~28C even with a (mild) OC to 2.4GHz which gives me a new and slightly higher 'resting' speed of 1.8GHz.
Note: in Intel-land, the 4-pin CPU fan is also factored into the EIST scheme by having its speed monitored and controlled,
Regards
December 18, 2006 4:36:32 PM

Well, that's funny. My BIOS has two seperate things. One says EIST and the other says SpeedStep. This is on an ASUS P5W DH Deluxe motherboad. If I enable EIST, the VCore drops when idle, but not the frequency of the processor.

To get technical, I have TM2, EIST, C1E, and Speedstep listed in my BIOS. I'll have to double check, but last time I looked, that was how it is. Unless like the other person said, EIST and SpeedStep is the same.
December 18, 2006 4:40:01 PM

Quote:
Yes - EIST or SpeedStep is the Intel Cool n' Quiet.
I would select 'Minimal Power Management' setting to enable it.
'Always On' setting will quickly disable it.
On my rig my multiplier is reduced to 6x, which of course will reduce the CPU speed.
Also, and more importantly, my CPU voltage is reduced to ~1.050V.
So I'm idling @ ~28C even with a (mild) OC to 2.4GHz which gives me a new and slightly higher 'resting' speed of 1.8GHz.
Note: in Intel-land, the 4-pin CPU fan is also factored into the EIST scheme by having its speed monitored and controlled,
Regards


I hate you! Mine idles at 1.114V whereas my AMD idles at exactly 1.000V :evil: 

My AMD still runs cooler :oops: 
December 19, 2006 1:19:25 AM

Quote:
As far as I know, it is all done from power options in the control panel.
Switch it to portable/laptop mode and it will scale your cpu bact to a 6X multiplier when you are not under load.


Does this still work if you change the some time values for the different power saving modes. Will it work for a self created power mode?
December 19, 2006 12:08:47 PM

Don't think so. But you can choose Portable/Laptop or whatever and adjust the power management.

With Vista, I can't seem to get my C2D to throttle down :( 
December 20, 2006 8:37:18 PM

Well, i've been using CPUIdle since the 90's. It's done me well, lowering the idle temps by about 10 degrees c. However, i haven't touched intel since the PIII (still use it as my fileserver) so your mileage may vary. But, i'd put money on it lowering the temps a considerable amount.
!