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Security Descriptors?

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  • Security
  • Microsoft
  • Windows XP
Last response: in Windows XP
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January 15, 2005 12:55:53 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Could someone please explain in simple terms what these are and how
important they are? Reason I ask is that Norton Disk Doctor found errors
here and fixed them after a re-boot.
Have Googled the term but didn't really understand the things I was reading.

--

Kenny

More about : security descriptors

Anonymous
a b 8 Security
January 15, 2005 12:55:54 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Hi Kenny,

<Snip from the article below>

Phase 3: Checking security descriptors
During its third pass, CHKDSK displays a message that tells you that
CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors and, for the third time,
displays "percent completed," counting from 0 to 100 percent. During
this phase, CHKDSK examines each security descriptor that is
associated with files or directories that are on the volume.

Security descriptors contain information about ownership of a file or
directory, about NTFS permissions for the file or directory, and about
auditing for the file or directory. The "percent completed" that
CHKDSK displays during this phase is the percentage of the volume's
files and directories that have been checked. CHKDSK verifies that
each security descriptor structure is well formed and is internally
consistent. CHKDSK does not verify the actual existence of the users
or groups that are listed or the appropriateness of the permissions
that are granted.

An explanation of the new /C and /I Switches that are available to use
with Chkdsk.exe
http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;314835

You can also search for more information here:
Symantec Search
http://www.symantec.com/search/

--
Regards,
Bert Kinney [MS-MVP DTS]
http://dts-l.org/


Kenny wrote:
> Could someone please explain in simple terms what these
> are and how important they are? Reason I ask is that
> Norton Disk Doctor found errors here and fixed them after
> a re-boot.
> Have Googled the term but didn't really understand the
> things I was reading.
January 15, 2005 2:35:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks Bert for the reply.

--

Kenny



"Bert Kinney" <bert@NSmvps.org> wrote in message
news:#qYiIno#EHA.2568@TK2MSFTNGP10.phx.gbl...
> Hi Kenny,
>
> <Snip from the article below>
>
> Phase 3: Checking security descriptors
> During its third pass, CHKDSK displays a message that tells you that
> CHKDSK is verifying security descriptors and, for the third time,
> displays "percent completed," counting from 0 to 100 percent. During
> this phase, CHKDSK examines each security descriptor that is
> associated with files or directories that are on the volume.
>
> Security descriptors contain information about ownership of a file or
> directory, about NTFS permissions for the file or directory, and about
> auditing for the file or directory. The "percent completed" that
> CHKDSK displays during this phase is the percentage of the volume's
> files and directories that have been checked. CHKDSK verifies that
> each security descriptor structure is well formed and is internally
> consistent. CHKDSK does not verify the actual existence of the users
> or groups that are listed or the appropriateness of the permissions
> that are granted.
>
> An explanation of the new /C and /I Switches that are available to use
> with Chkdsk.exe
> http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;314835
>
> You can also search for more information here:
> Symantec Search
> http://www.symantec.com/search/
>
> --
> Regards,
> Bert Kinney [MS-MVP DTS]
> http://dts-l.org/
>
>
> Kenny wrote:
> > Could someone please explain in simple terms what these
> > are and how important they are? Reason I ask is that
> > Norton Disk Doctor found errors here and fixed them after
> > a re-boot.
> > Have Googled the term but didn't really understand the
> > things I was reading.
>
>
!