Where did my administrator go?

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

After installing XP pro, installing all software, all settings, address
books, bookmarks, documents, blahblah, I was advised (here) to set up a
user account, which I did.

After again installing all my address books, preferences, documents,
blahblah to make this new user work, the administrator disappeared. It
still shows in explorer, but it is not in start/logoff/switch user or in
control panel/user accounts.

I want my administrator back!

tia
m
5 answers Last reply
More about where administrator
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "mike gray" <omgray@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:ka%Fd.7798$S11.1891@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > After installing XP pro, installing all software, all settings,
    > address books, bookmarks, documents, blahblah, I was advised (here) to
    > set up a user account, which I did.
    >
    > After again installing all my address books, preferences, documents,
    > blahblah to make this new user work, the administrator disappeared. It
    > still shows in explorer, but it is not in start/logoff/switch user or
    > in control panel/user accounts.
    >
    > I want my administrator back!
    >
    > tia
    > m


    Once you create another admin-level account, the default Administrator
    account gets hidden. Presumably you are using the Fisher-Price "Welcome
    Screen" to login, so the Administrator account will disappear once you
    have another admin account. Hit Ctrl-Alt-Del twice to get the classic
    login screen (http://www.jsiinc.com/SUBI/tip4400/rh4485.htm), or disable
    the Fisher-Price login screen and revert back to the classical login
    screen (plus you might want to alter local security policies to require
    hitting Ctrl-Alt-Del to login). I don't care to use two different login
    screens depending on whether I'm at home or work
    (http://support.microsoft.com/?id=303594) so I reverted to the classic
    login screen (http://support.microsoft.com/?id=291559; I used secpol.msc
    to change the interactive login setting instead of the registry hack).

    Instead of using the User Passwords applet in Control Panel, use the
    advanced applet for user passwords by running "control userpasswords2".
    You can also use the Computer Management MMC (compmgmt.msc) to look at
    accounts.

    --
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  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    mike gray wrote:
    > After installing XP pro, installing all software, all settings, address
    > books, bookmarks, documents, blahblah, I was advised (here) to set up a
    > user account, which I did.
    >
    > After again installing all my address books, preferences, documents,
    > blahblah to make this new user work, the administrator disappeared. It
    > still shows in explorer, but it is not in start/logoff/switch user or in
    > control panel/user accounts.
    >
    > I want my administrator back!
    >
    > tia
    > m


    As you've learned, once any additional user accounts have been
    created, the Administrator account will no longer be displayed on the
    Welcome Screen. This is a default security feature. By design, the
    only way to log into the Administrator account of WinXP Home is to
    reboot into Safe Mode. For WinXP Pro, pressing CTRL+ALT+DEL twice at
    the Welcome Screen will produce the standard login dialog box.

    The built-in Administrator account really isn't intended to be
    used for day-to-day normal use. The standard security practice is to
    set a strong password on it and use it only to create another account
    for regular use, reserving the Administrator account as a "back door"
    in case something corrupts your regular account(s).

    A wiser course of action would be to create another user account
    for your daily use, as you say you've done, and copy desired the files
    and settings from the Administrator account to this newly created user
    profile.

    HOW TO Create and Configure User Accounts in Windows XP
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;279783

    How to Copy User Data to a New User Profile
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=kb;en-us;811151


    --

    Bruce Chambers

    Help us help you:
    http://dts-l.org/goodpost.htm
    http://www.catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html

    You can have peace. Or you can have freedom. Don't ever count on having
    both at once. - RAH
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    (snip)

    Thanks to both of you.

    Wish there was a simple way to create a new account with all the
    preferences etc. of the administrator. It's really a pita to find and
    transfer stuff like email settings, bookmarks, address books, and such
    for a non-tech type like meself.

    Why not a "transfer all" function, maybe with a menu showing delete options?

    m
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    "mike gray" <omgray@worldnet.att.net> wrote in message
    news:a5gGd.25057$w62.10563@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
    > (snip)
    >
    > Thanks to both of you.
    >
    > Wish there was a simple way to create a new account with all the
    > preferences etc. of the administrator. It's really a pita to find and
    > transfer stuff like email settings, bookmarks, address books, and such
    > for a non-tech type like meself.
    >
    > Why not a "transfer all" function, maybe with a menu showing delete
    > options?
    >
    > m


    Well, there is if the method I mention is what you are looking for. I
    have the Administrator account which I never touch (except as noted
    below when copying profiles). I have an AdminBackup account as a backup
    admin-level account and also needed as the 3rd account required in the
    copy method mentioned below. I have my own account (which happens to be
    an admin-level account) and is the one I always use for login.

    1. Logout of your account (which I'm presuming is an admin account).
    2. Login under the AdminBackup account. This is required so that none
    of the files under either the source or target profile are inuse,
    including the registry .dat files. (See
    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=291555.)
    3. Now copy the profile for your normal login (admin) account over the
    Administrator account:
    - Right-click on My Computer, Properties, Advanced, User Profiles.
    - Select your own admin account (as the source profile).
    - Click "Copy To".
    - Browse to the profile path for the Administrator.
    - Make sure the Administrator account has permissions to its new
    overwritten profile:
    o Click the Change button (under the "Permitted to Use" section).
    o Click Advanced.
    o Click Find Now.
    o Select the "Administrator" account. Click Ok.
    o Click Ok. Should be back to the "Copy To" dialog.
    4. Click OK to copy the source profile over the target profile. Besides
    copying over the profile, the permissions get changed from those for the
    source profile to the account you specified above.

    Now when you login under the Administrator profile, you get the same
    Start menu, the same application data, same My Documents (which you may
    not really want a duplicate of), and so forth. Basically I do this so
    the Administrator profile is a duplicate of my normal login admin
    account. If my normal profile gets corrupted, the Administrator profile
    is just like it.

    Before I do the above step, I usually change the path to My Documents.
    I really don't want a copy of all my documents under one profile to get
    duplicated under another profile. Right-click on the My Computer
    desktop icon, Properties, and change its path. Then check the
    permissions on that path allow your account access to that new path (and
    no one else other than Administrators and System have full access). I
    move My Documents under D:\Users\<profilename>. Only Administrators and
    System have any access to D:\Users and I add the user to their own
    profile underneath there. If I ever have to reformat my C: drive
    containing Windows, my data remains intact over on D: (and I just have
    to change My Documents to point over there again). When I copy
    profiles, I don't end up duplicating the My Documents under one profile
    under another profile. Maybe you want the duplication but remember that
    the duplicated docs under the target profile won't be kept in sync with
    those under your profile.

    It sounds like a lot of work but after you move the My Documents path
    (and make sure permissions are valid) then the only action you have to
    take occasionally is to use the Copy To for user profiles mentioned
    above. Obviously you want to copy the profile when everything seems to
    be running properly for awhile. I tend to toggle between copying to
    Administrator and to AdminBackup so that I have one profile back I can
    revert beyond the last time that I copied my own profile. The above
    looks complicated until you realize the skinny procedure is:

    - Log into an intermediary account (with admin privileges).
    - Select the source profile path.
    - Select the target profile path.
    - Make sure permissions are correct so the target account can access the
    overwritten profile.
    - Copy.
    - (And you'll probably want to test the target profile still works
    okay.)

    There is a way using the registry to actually have multiple accounts
    point at the same profile path. I had that working for awhile but
    decided to disconnect them. If the profile got corrupted then the same
    profile was corrupted for all the accounts sharing that same profile.
    Also, you might modify the above and NEVER copy over the Administrator
    profile and just copy over the AdminBackup profile (the names for
    whatever backup accounts/profiles you want to use may vary).

    I probably got some of the above from articles like
    http://support.microsoft.com/?id=168475 but some I just figured out,
    like changing the path to My Documents so copying the profile didn't
    take so long making duplicates of my documents that I didn't want
    duplicated anyway.

    There is one fly in the soup regarding copying of profiles. I noticed
    there were times that I would login under Profile C but the Copy To
    button was disable when I attempted to select Profile B (to copy over
    Profile A). http://support.microsoft.com/?id=291555 indicates that you
    can't be logged in under the target account (so it's profile isn't
    inuse) but you also must not be logged in under the source account (so
    none of its profile is inuse). However, when I logged off Profile B to
    login under Profile C, Profile B could not be copied. It turns out
    Microsoft screwed up a bit perhaps because of their fast switch user
    mode (which I don't use, anyway). I discovered that the ntuser.dat was
    from Profile B still had a handle on it from SYSTEM when I was logged in
    under Profile C (I used the oh.exe tool from the W2K Resource Kit to
    list open file handles). Since I was logged in under a completely
    different account and should be using its own ntuser.dat (for that
    account's registry settings), the ntuser.dat for the account that I was
    no longer logged in under should have been free. Not always, and the
    only way around that I've found so far is to reboot and login straight
    away into the intermediary account so I can copy over my normal
    account's profile into the other account's profile. I haven't a clue
    why SYSTEM still needs an open file handle on an account's ntuser.dat
    file when NOT logged under that account.

    --
    _________________________________________________________________
    Post your replies to the newsgroup. Share with others.
    E-mail: vanguard_help AT yahoo.com (append "#NEWS#" to Subject)
    _________________________________________________________________
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

    mike gray <omgray@worldnet.att.net> wrote in
    news:a5gGd.25057$w62.10563@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net:

    > (snip)
    >
    > Thanks to both of you.
    >
    > Wish there was a simple way to create a new account with all the
    > preferences etc. of the administrator. It's really a pita to find and
    > transfer stuff like email settings, bookmarks, address books, and such
    > for a non-tech type like meself.
    >
    > Why not a "transfer all" function, maybe with a menu showing delete
    > options?
    >
    > m
    >

    As of today I can sympathise with you. after hours of tech support help
    I just deleted the darn account and went back to just one. If I find an
    easier way i'll post it here.
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