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F4 ::= Ctrl E

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Anonymous
January 16, 2005 12:10:30 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

How do I assign the F4 key to become a control-E ?

Thanks,

Rick
Merrill

More about : ctrl

January 16, 2005 12:33:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

You can try at the below website (URL), it may or may not work.
Remapping your Keyboard
http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~haddock/pb.remap.html

"Rick Merrill" wrote:

> How do I assign the F4 key to become a control-E ?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Rick
> Merrill
>
Anonymous
January 16, 2005 3:50:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Byte wrote:

> You can try at the below website (URL), it may or may not work.
> Remapping your Keyboard
> http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~haddock/pb.remap.html
>
> "Rick Merrill" wrote:
>
>
>>How do I assign the F4 key to become a control-E ?
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>Rick
>>Merrill
>>

Thanks, b u t it seems to be an Apple site!?
Related resources
Can't find your answer ? Ask !
Anonymous
January 16, 2005 9:58:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Just type "keyboard remapping software" [less the quote markers] in Google
and you will drown in the results. Two I have heard of are "SharpKeys" and
"KeyTweak". Some are free, some cost money.
"Rick Merrill" <RickMerrill@comTHROW.net> wrote in message
news:%23zxIfU9%23EHA.2016@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> How do I assign the F4 key to become a control-E ?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Rick
> Merrill
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 12:22:25 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Gene K wrote:

> Just type "keyboard remapping software" [less the quote markers] in Google
> and you will drown in the results. Two I have heard of are "SharpKeys" and
> "KeyTweak". Some are free, some cost money.
> "Rick Merrill" <RickMerrill@comTHROW.net> wrote in message
> news:%23zxIfU9%23EHA.2016@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
>>How do I assign the F4 key to become a control-E ?
>>
>>Thanks,
>>
>>Rick
>>Merrill
>
>
>

Thanks for the "pointers"
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 3:12:46 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Paste the two lines into a text file and name it something.vbs. Then set a shortcut to the script and set a hotkey (F4) for the shortcut (see help) .

set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
WshShell.SendKeys "^e"

If you need to enter " use (say in - I said "that's alright")

WshShell.SendKeys "I said " & chr(34) & "that's alright" & chr(34)

& joins strings together and chr(34) is the " character. Strings using letters MUST be enclosed in quotes so we use chr(34) to replace " in the string we wish to send.

WshShell.SendKeys "%{TAB}^c%{TAB}^v"
[above sends Alt + Tab, Ctrl + C, Alt + Tab, then Ctrl + V]

Then set a shortcut to the scripts and set a hotkey for the shortcut (see help)


Windows Script Host

SendKeys Method
See Also
WshShell Object | Run Method

Sends one or more keystrokes to the active window (as if typed on the keyboard).

object.SendKeys(string)
Arguments
object
WshShell object.
string
String value indicating the keystroke(s) you want to send.
Remarks
Use the SendKeys method to send keystrokes to applications that have no automation interface. Most keyboard characters are represented by a single keystroke. Some keyboard characters are made up of combinations of keystrokes (CTRL+SHIFT+HOME, for example). To send a single keyboard character, send the character itself as the string argument. For example, to send the letter x, send the string argument "x".

Note To send a space, send the string " ".
You can use SendKeys to send more than one keystroke at a time. To do this, create a compound string argument that represents a sequence of keystrokes by appending each keystroke in the sequence to the one before it. For example, to send the keystrokes a, b, and c, you would send the string argument "abc". The SendKeys method uses some characters as modifiers of characters (instead of using their face-values). This set of special characters consists of parentheses, brackets, braces, and the:

a.. plus sign "+",
b.. caret "^",
c.. percent sign "%",
d.. and tilde "~"
Send these characters by enclosing them within braces "{}". For example, to send the plus sign, send the string argument "{+}". Brackets "[ ]" have no special meaning when used with SendKeys, but you must enclose them within braces to accommodate applications that do give them a special meaning (for dynamic data exchange (DDE) for example).

a.. To send bracket characters, send the string argument "{[}" for the left bracket and "{]}" for the right one.
b.. To send brace characters, send the string argument "{{}" for the left brace and "{}}" for the right one.
Some keystrokes do not generate characters (such as ENTER and TAB). Some keystrokes represent actions (such as BACKSPACE and BREAK). To send these kinds of keystrokes, send the arguments shown in the following table:

Key Argument
BACKSPACE {BACKSPACE}, {BS}, or {BKSP}
BREAK {BREAK}
CAPS LOCK {CAPSLOCK}
DEL or DELETE {DELETE} or {DEL}
DOWN ARROW {DOWN}
END {END}
ENTER {ENTER} or ~
ESC {ESC}
HELP {HELP}
HOME {HOME}
INS or INSERT {INSERT} or {INS}
LEFT ARROW {LEFT}
NUM LOCK {NUMLOCK}
PAGE DOWN {PGDN}
PAGE UP {PGUP}
PRINT SCREEN {PRTSC}
RIGHT ARROW {RIGHT}
SCROLL LOCK {SCROLLLOCK}
TAB {TAB}
UP ARROW {UP}
F1 {F1}
F2 {F2}
F3 {F3}
F4 {F4}
F5 {F5}
F6 {F6}
F7 {F7}
F8 {F8}
F9 {F9}
F10 {F10}
F11 {F11}
F12 {F12}
F13 {F13}
F14 {F14}
F15 {F15}
F16 {F16}

To send keyboard characters that are comprised of a regular keystroke in combination with a SHIFT, CTRL, or ALT, create a compound string argument that represents the keystroke combination. You do this by preceding the regular keystroke with one or more of the following special characters:

Key Special Character
SHIFT +
CTRL ^
ALT %

Note When used this way, these special characters are not enclosed within a set of braces.
To specify that a combination of SHIFT, CTRL, and ALT should be held down while several other keys are pressed, create a compound string argument with the modified keystrokes enclosed in parentheses. For example, to send the keystroke combination that specifies that the SHIFT key is held down while:

a.. e and c are pressed, send the string argument "+(ec)".
b.. e is pressed, followed by a lone c (with no SHIFT), send the string argument "+ec".
You can use the SendKeys method to send a pattern of keystrokes that consists of a single keystroke pressed several times in a row. To do this, create a compound string argument that specifies the keystroke you want to repeat, followed by the number of times you want it repeated. You do this using a compound string argument of the form {keystroke number}. For example, to send the letter "x" ten times, you would send the string argument "{x 10}". Be sure to include a space between keystroke and number.

Note The only keystroke pattern you can send is the kind that is comprised of a single keystroke pressed several times. For example, you can send "x" ten times, but you cannot do the same for "Ctrl+x".
Note You cannot send the PRINT SCREEN key {PRTSC} to an application.
Example
The following example demonstrates the use of a single .wsf file for two jobs in different script languages (VBScript and JScript). Each job runs the Windows calculator and sends it keystrokes to execute a simple calculation.

<package>
<job id="vbs">
<script language="VBScript">
set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
WshShell.Run "calc"
WScript.Sleep 100
WshShell.AppActivate "Calculator"
WScript.Sleep 100
WshShell.SendKeys "1{+}"
WScript.Sleep 500
WshShell.SendKeys "2"
WScript.Sleep 500
WshShell.SendKeys "~"
WScript.Sleep 500
WshShell.SendKeys "*3"
WScript.Sleep 500
WshShell.SendKeys "~"
WScript.Sleep 2500
</script>
</job>

<job id="js">
<script language="JScript">
var WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell");
WshShell.Run("calc");
WScript.Sleep(100);
WshShell.AppActivate("Calculator");
WScript.Sleep(100);
WshShell.SendKeys ("1{+}");
WScript.Sleep(500);
WshShell.SendKeys("2");
WScript.Sleep(500);
WshShell.SendKeys("~");
WScript.Sleep(500);
WshShell.SendKeys("*3");
WScript.Sleep(500);
WshShell.SendKeys("~");
WScript.Sleep(2500);
</script>
</job>
</package>
See Also
WshShell Object | Run Method






--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Rick Merrill" <RickMerrill@comTHROW.net> wrote in message news:%23lJYkP$%23EHA.3376@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> Byte wrote:
>
>> You can try at the below website (URL), it may or may not work.
>> Remapping your Keyboard
>> http://www.lifesci.ucsb.edu/~haddock/pb.remap.html
>>
>> "Rick Merrill" wrote:
>>
>>
>>>How do I assign the F4 key to become a control-E ?
>>>
>>>Thanks,
>>>
>>>Rick
>>>Merrill
>>>
>
> Thanks, b u t it seems to be an Apple site!?
Anonymous
January 17, 2005 3:12:47 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Thanks for the tutorial!!
Anonymous
January 18, 2005 9:04:20 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

David Candy wrote:
> Paste the two lines into a text file and name it something.vbs. Then set a shortcut to the script and set a hotkey (F4) for the shortcut (see help) .
>
> set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
> WshShell.SendKeys "^e"

I don't understand how the computer knows to use "something.vbs" nor
where it is supposed to be.

-- RM


> If you need to enter " use (say in - I said "that's alright")
>
> WshShell.SendKeys "I said " & chr(34) & "that's alright" & chr(34)
>
> & joins strings together and chr(34) is the " character. Strings using letters MUST be enclosed in quotes so we use chr(34) to replace " in the string we wish to send.
>
> WshShell.SendKeys "%{TAB}^c%{TAB}^v"
> [above sends Alt + Tab, Ctrl + C, Alt + Tab, then Ctrl + V]
>
> Then set a shortcut to the scripts and set a hotkey for the shortcut (see help)
>
>
> Windows Script Host
>
> SendKeys Method
> See Also
> WshShell Object | Run Method
>
> Sends one or more keystrokes to the active window (as if typed on the keyboard).
>
> object.SendKeys(string)
> Arguments
> object
> WshShell object.
> string
> String value indicating the keystroke(s) you want to send.
> Remarks
> Use the SendKeys method to send keystrokes to applications that have no automation interface. Most keyboard characters are represented by a single keystroke. Some keyboard characters are made up of combinations of keystrokes (CTRL+SHIFT+HOME, for example). To send a single keyboard character, send the character itself as the string argument. For example, to send the letter x, send the string argument "x".
>
> Note To send a space, send the string " ".
> You can use SendKeys to send more than one keystroke at a time. To do this, create a compound string argument that represents a sequence of keystrokes by appending each keystroke in the sequence to the one before it. For example, to send the keystrokes a, b, and c, you would send the string argument "abc". The SendKeys method uses some characters as modifiers of characters (instead of using their face-values). This set of special characters consists of parentheses, brackets, braces, and the:
>
> a.. plus sign "+",
> b.. caret "^",
> c.. percent sign "%",
> d.. and tilde "~"
> Send these characters by enclosing them within braces "{}". For example, to send the plus sign, send the string argument "{+}". Brackets "[ ]" have no special meaning when used with SendKeys, but you must enclose them within braces to accommodate applications that do give them a special meaning (for dynamic data exchange (DDE) for example).
>
> a.. To send bracket characters, send the string argument "{[}" for the left bracket and "{]}" for the right one.
> b.. To send brace characters, send the string argument "{{}" for the left brace and "{}}" for the right one.
> Some keystrokes do not generate characters (such as ENTER and TAB). Some keystrokes represent actions (such as BACKSPACE and BREAK). To send these kinds of keystrokes, send the arguments shown in the following table:
>
> Key Argument
> BACKSPACE {BACKSPACE}, {BS}, or {BKSP}
> BREAK {BREAK}
> CAPS LOCK {CAPSLOCK}
> DEL or DELETE {DELETE} or {DEL}
> DOWN ARROW {DOWN}
> END {END}
> ENTER {ENTER} or ~
> ESC {ESC}
> HELP {HELP}
> HOME {HOME}
> INS or INSERT {INSERT} or {INS}
> LEFT ARROW {LEFT}
> NUM LOCK {NUMLOCK}
> PAGE DOWN {PGDN}
> PAGE UP {PGUP}
> PRINT SCREEN {PRTSC}
> RIGHT ARROW {RIGHT}
> SCROLL LOCK {SCROLLLOCK}
> TAB {TAB}
> UP ARROW {UP}
> F1 {F1}
> F2 {F2}
> F3 {F3}
> F4 {F4}
> F5 {F5}
> F6 {F6}
> F7 {F7}
> F8 {F8}
> F9 {F9}
> F10 {F10}
> F11 {F11}
> F12 {F12}
> F13 {F13}
> F14 {F14}
> F15 {F15}
> F16 {F16}
>
> To send keyboard characters that are comprised of a regular keystroke in combination with a SHIFT, CTRL, or ALT, create a compound string argument that represents the keystroke combination. You do this by preceding the regular keystroke with one or more of the following special characters:
>
> Key Special Character
> SHIFT +
> CTRL ^
> ALT %
>
> Note When used this way, these special characters are not enclosed within a set of braces.
> To specify that a combination of SHIFT, CTRL, and ALT should be held down while several other keys are pressed, create a compound string argument with the modified keystrokes enclosed in parentheses. For example, to send the keystroke combination that specifies that the SHIFT key is held down while:
>
> a.. e and c are pressed, send the string argument "+(ec)".
> b.. e is pressed, followed by a lone c (with no SHIFT), send the string argument "+ec".
> You can use the SendKeys method to send a pattern of keystrokes that consists of a single keystroke pressed several times in a row. To do this, create a compound string argument that specifies the keystroke you want to repeat, followed by the number of times you want it repeated. You do this using a compound string argument of the form {keystroke number}. For example, to send the letter "x" ten times, you would send the string argument "{x 10}". Be sure to include a space between keystroke and number.
>
> Note The only keystroke pattern you can send is the kind that is comprised of a single keystroke pressed several times. For example, you can send "x" ten times, but you cannot do the same for "Ctrl+x".
> Note You cannot send the PRINT SCREEN key {PRTSC} to an application.
> Example
> The following example demonstrates the use of a single .wsf file for two jobs in different script languages (VBScript and JScript). Each job runs the Windows calculator and sends it keystrokes to execute a simple calculation.
>
> <package>
> <job id="vbs">
> <script language="VBScript">
> set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
> WshShell.Run "calc"
> WScript.Sleep 100
> WshShell.AppActivate "Calculator"
> WScript.Sleep 100
> WshShell.SendKeys "1{+}"
> WScript.Sleep 500
> WshShell.SendKeys "2"
> WScript.Sleep 500
> WshShell.SendKeys "~"
> WScript.Sleep 500
> WshShell.SendKeys "*3"
> WScript.Sleep 500
> WshShell.SendKeys "~"
> WScript.Sleep 2500
> </script>
> </job>
>
> <job id="js">
> <script language="JScript">
> var WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell");
> WshShell.Run("calc");
> WScript.Sleep(100);
> WshShell.AppActivate("Calculator");
> WScript.Sleep(100);
> WshShell.SendKeys ("1{+}");
> WScript.Sleep(500);
> WshShell.SendKeys("2");
> WScript.Sleep(500);
> WshShell.SendKeys("~");
> WScript.Sleep(500);
> WshShell.SendKeys("*3");
> WScript.Sleep(500);
> WshShell.SendKeys("~");
> WScript.Sleep(2500);
> </script>
> </job>
> </package>
> See Also
> WshShell Object | Run Method
>
>
>
>
>
>
Anonymous
January 19, 2005 3:20:09 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Put the file anywhere you want. Create a shortcut to it either on the desktop or on the start menu. Assign F4 key in the properties of the shortcut.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Rick Merrill" <RickMerrill@comTHROW.net> wrote in message news:%23cZ6FIb$EHA.1400@TK2MSFTNGP11.phx.gbl...
> David Candy wrote:
>> Paste the two lines into a text file and name it something.vbs. Then set a shortcut to the script and set a hotkey (F4) for the shortcut (see help) .
>>
>> set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
>> WshShell.SendKeys "^e"
>
> I don't understand how the computer knows to use "something.vbs" nor
> where it is supposed to be.
>
> -- RM
>
>
>> If you need to enter " use (say in - I said "that's alright")
>>
>> WshShell.SendKeys "I said " & chr(34) & "that's alright" & chr(34)
>>
>> & joins strings together and chr(34) is the " character. Strings using letters MUST be enclosed in quotes so we use chr(34) to replace " in the string we wish to send.
>>
>> WshShell.SendKeys "%{TAB}^c%{TAB}^v"
>> [above sends Alt + Tab, Ctrl + C, Alt + Tab, then Ctrl + V]
>>
>> Then set a shortcut to the scripts and set a hotkey for the shortcut (see help)
>>
>>
>> Windows Script Host
>>
>> SendKeys Method
>> See Also
>> WshShell Object | Run Method
>>
>> Sends one or more keystrokes to the active window (as if typed on the keyboard).
>>
>> object.SendKeys(string)
>> Arguments
>> object
>> WshShell object.
>> string
>> String value indicating the keystroke(s) you want to send.
>> Remarks
>> Use the SendKeys method to send keystrokes to applications that have no automation interface. Most keyboard characters are represented by a single keystroke. Some keyboard characters are made up of combinations of keystrokes (CTRL+SHIFT+HOME, for example). To send a single keyboard character, send the character itself as the string argument. For example, to send the letter x, send the string argument "x".
>>
>> Note To send a space, send the string " ".
>> You can use SendKeys to send more than one keystroke at a time. To do this, create a compound string argument that represents a sequence of keystrokes by appending each keystroke in the sequence to the one before it. For example, to send the keystrokes a, b, and c, you would send the string argument "abc". The SendKeys method uses some characters as modifiers of characters (instead of using their face-values). This set of special characters consists of parentheses, brackets, braces, and the:
>>
>> a.. plus sign "+",
>> b.. caret "^",
>> c.. percent sign "%",
>> d.. and tilde "~"
>> Send these characters by enclosing them within braces "{}". For example, to send the plus sign, send the string argument "{+}". Brackets "[ ]" have no special meaning when used with SendKeys, but you must enclose them within braces to accommodate applications that do give them a special meaning (for dynamic data exchange (DDE) for example).
>>
>> a.. To send bracket characters, send the string argument "{[}" for the left bracket and "{]}" for the right one.
>> b.. To send brace characters, send the string argument "{{}" for the left brace and "{}}" for the right one.
>> Some keystrokes do not generate characters (such as ENTER and TAB). Some keystrokes represent actions (such as BACKSPACE and BREAK). To send these kinds of keystrokes, send the arguments shown in the following table:
>>
>> Key Argument
>> BACKSPACE {BACKSPACE}, {BS}, or {BKSP}
>> BREAK {BREAK}
>> CAPS LOCK {CAPSLOCK}
>> DEL or DELETE {DELETE} or {DEL}
>> DOWN ARROW {DOWN}
>> END {END}
>> ENTER {ENTER} or ~
>> ESC {ESC}
>> HELP {HELP}
>> HOME {HOME}
>> INS or INSERT {INSERT} or {INS}
>> LEFT ARROW {LEFT}
>> NUM LOCK {NUMLOCK}
>> PAGE DOWN {PGDN}
>> PAGE UP {PGUP}
>> PRINT SCREEN {PRTSC}
>> RIGHT ARROW {RIGHT}
>> SCROLL LOCK {SCROLLLOCK}
>> TAB {TAB}
>> UP ARROW {UP}
>> F1 {F1}
>> F2 {F2}
>> F3 {F3}
>> F4 {F4}
>> F5 {F5}
>> F6 {F6}
>> F7 {F7}
>> F8 {F8}
>> F9 {F9}
>> F10 {F10}
>> F11 {F11}
>> F12 {F12}
>> F13 {F13}
>> F14 {F14}
>> F15 {F15}
>> F16 {F16}
>>
>> To send keyboard characters that are comprised of a regular keystroke in combination with a SHIFT, CTRL, or ALT, create a compound string argument that represents the keystroke combination. You do this by preceding the regular keystroke with one or more of the following special characters:
>>
>> Key Special Character
>> SHIFT +
>> CTRL ^
>> ALT %
>>
>> Note When used this way, these special characters are not enclosed within a set of braces.
>> To specify that a combination of SHIFT, CTRL, and ALT should be held down while several other keys are pressed, create a compound string argument with the modified keystrokes enclosed in parentheses. For example, to send the keystroke combination that specifies that the SHIFT key is held down while:
>>
>> a.. e and c are pressed, send the string argument "+(ec)".
>> b.. e is pressed, followed by a lone c (with no SHIFT), send the string argument "+ec".
>> You can use the SendKeys method to send a pattern of keystrokes that consists of a single keystroke pressed several times in a row. To do this, create a compound string argument that specifies the keystroke you want to repeat, followed by the number of times you want it repeated. You do this using a compound string argument of the form {keystroke number}. For example, to send the letter "x" ten times, you would send the string argument "{x 10}". Be sure to include a space between keystroke and number.
>>
>> Note The only keystroke pattern you can send is the kind that is comprised of a single keystroke pressed several times. For example, you can send "x" ten times, but you cannot do the same for "Ctrl+x".
>> Note You cannot send the PRINT SCREEN key {PRTSC} to an application.
>> Example
>> The following example demonstrates the use of a single .wsf file for two jobs in different script languages (VBScript and JScript). Each job runs the Windows calculator and sends it keystrokes to execute a simple calculation.
>>
>> <package>
>> <job id="vbs">
>> <script language="VBScript">
>> set WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
>> WshShell.Run "calc"
>> WScript.Sleep 100
>> WshShell.AppActivate "Calculator"
>> WScript.Sleep 100
>> WshShell.SendKeys "1{+}"
>> WScript.Sleep 500
>> WshShell.SendKeys "2"
>> WScript.Sleep 500
>> WshShell.SendKeys "~"
>> WScript.Sleep 500
>> WshShell.SendKeys "*3"
>> WScript.Sleep 500
>> WshShell.SendKeys "~"
>> WScript.Sleep 2500
>> </script>
>> </job>
>>
>> <job id="js">
>> <script language="JScript">
>> var WshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell");
>> WshShell.Run("calc");
>> WScript.Sleep(100);
>> WshShell.AppActivate("Calculator");
>> WScript.Sleep(100);
>> WshShell.SendKeys ("1{+}");
>> WScript.Sleep(500);
>> WshShell.SendKeys("2");
>> WScript.Sleep(500);
>> WshShell.SendKeys("~");
>> WScript.Sleep(500);
>> WshShell.SendKeys("*3");
>> WScript.Sleep(500);
>> WshShell.SendKeys("~");
>> WScript.Sleep(2500);
>> </script>
>> </job>
>> </package>
>> See Also
>> WshShell Object | Run Method
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
Anonymous
January 19, 2005 11:38:56 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

David Candy wrote:

> Put the file anywhere you want.
>Create a shortcut to it either on the desktop or on the start menu.
> Assign F4 key in the properties of the shortcut.

Win XP Pro sp2 ... won't let me change the "shortcut: None"
How do I assign the F4 key in the properties? This tool sounds
like it could be very valuable and better than just changeing scan
codes. Thanks. - RM
Anonymous
January 19, 2005 11:41:34 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

David Candy wrote:

> Put the file anywhere you want. Create a shortcut to it either on the desktop or on the start menu. Assign F4 key in the properties of the shortcut.
>

Nevermind: I got it !!!! Thanks again!!!
Anonymous
January 19, 2005 11:44:38 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

David Candy wrote:

> Put the file anywhere you want. Create a shortcut to it either on the desktop or on the start menu. Assign F4 key in the properties of the shortcut.
>


mmmm, Now I'm getting unexpected "end of statement"
Anonymous
January 22, 2005 9:47:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.windowsxp.basics (More info?)

Well it's two lines. So check carefully.

--
----------------------------------------------------------
http://www.uscricket.com
"Rick Merrill" <RickMerrill@comTHROW.net> wrote in message news:%23$bVUGp$EHA.1604@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> David Candy wrote:
>
>> Put the file anywhere you want. Create a shortcut to it either on the desktop or on the start menu. Assign F4 key in the properties of the shortcut.
>>
>
>
> mmmm, Now I'm getting unexpected "end of statement"
!