Copying system to new drive - pagefile problem

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I'm trying to move my installation over to a new, higher-capacity drive. So I:

Put the new drive in as a slave drive on the same IDE channel.
Partitioned the drive using Disk Manager in the old system.
Assigned drive letters to the new partitions
Booted into a second, bare-bones Win2K installation on the old drive.
Copied over the boot partition of the main Win2K installation on the old drive
onto the corresponding partition on the new drive.
Ran Win2K install to create the MBR on the new drive (I didn't install Win2K
itself over the copied Win2K installation.

Here's the problem. The copied Win2K installation boots, but at login it claims
that I have too small of a pagefile and then unceremoniously logs me
immediately out again. Looking at previous threads, the suggestion is that this
is generally caused by not giving system all rights to the %systemroot% drive.
I therefore made very sure to assign it explicit permissions, recopied, and
tried again. Still no luck.

Meanwhile the bare-bones Win2K system on the old drive I also managed to copy
onto the new drive and it boots without problems. So there's something else not
right with the main Win2K copy. Can anyone tell me what else might be wrong?
What do I need to do to get the main copy over successfully and boot?
Reinstalling the operating system is not an option.

--
Alex Rast
ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com
(remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
2 answers Last reply
More about copying system drive pagefile problem
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    "Alex Rast" <ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
    news:96354316adrastnwnotlinkcom@216.168.3.44...
    > I'm trying to move my installation over to a new, higher-capacity drive.
    So I:
    >
    > Put the new drive in as a slave drive on the same IDE channel.
    > Partitioned the drive using Disk Manager in the old system.
    > Assigned drive letters to the new partitions
    > Booted into a second, bare-bones Win2K installation on the old drive.
    > Copied over the boot partition of the main Win2K installation on the old
    drive
    > onto the corresponding partition on the new drive.
    > Ran Win2K install to create the MBR on the new drive (I didn't install
    Win2K
    > itself over the copied Win2K installation.
    >
    > Here's the problem. The copied Win2K installation boots, but at login it
    claims
    > that I have too small of a pagefile and then unceremoniously logs me
    > immediately out again. Looking at previous threads, the suggestion is that
    this
    > is generally caused by not giving system all rights to the %systemroot%
    drive.
    > I therefore made very sure to assign it explicit permissions, recopied,
    and
    > tried again. Still no luck.
    >
    > Meanwhile the bare-bones Win2K system on the old drive I also managed to
    copy
    > onto the new drive and it boots without problems. So there's something
    else not
    > right with the main Win2K copy. Can anyone tell me what else might be
    wrong?
    > What do I need to do to get the main copy over successfully and boot?
    > Reinstalling the operating system is not an option.
    >
    > --
    > Alex Rast
    > ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com
    > (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)

    The cause of your problem is quite simple: When you moved
    Windows to the new disk, your drive letters got jumbled up.
    Windows is now running off drive E: (for example) when
    it really should run off drive C:.

    The cure depends on your facilities:
    - Is the problem machine networked?
    - Can you temporarily install the problem disk as a slave
    disk in some other Win2000/XP PC?

    About "reinstalling the system" not being an option: If this
    is the case then you should seriously consider purchasing
    an imaging product (Acronis, PQMagic) and take a snapshot
    of your system. If you don't protect your investment then
    you'll lose it sooner or later.
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    at Mon, 11 Apr 2005 09:45:33 GMT in
    <#GAs7snPFHA.3988@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl>, I.can@fly.com (Pegasus (MVP))
    wrote :

    >
    >"Alex Rast" <ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com> wrote in message
    >news:96354316adrastnwnotlinkcom@216.168.3.44...
    >> I'm trying to move my installation over to a new, higher-capacity
    >> drive.
    ....
    >>
    >> Here's the problem. The copied Win2K installation boots, but at login
    >> it claims that I have too small of a pagefile and then unceremoniously
    >> logs me immediately out again. Looking at previous threads, the
    >> suggestion is that this is generally caused by not giving system all
    >> rights to the %systemroot% drive.
    >> I therefore made very sure to assign it explicit permissions,
    >> recopied, and tried again. Still no luck.
    >>
    >> What do I need to do to get the main copy over successfully and boot?
    >> Reinstalling the operating system is not an option.
    >>
    >> --
    >> Alex Rast
    >> ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com
    >> (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
    >
    >The cause of your problem is quite simple: When you moved
    >Windows to the new disk, your drive letters got jumbled up.
    >Windows is now running off drive E: (for example) when
    >it really should run off drive C:.

    Yes, I determined that last night. Even at the time I was assigning drive
    letters I was suspicious something like that might arise. However, I
    hoped Microsoft wouldn't be that stupid. It appears that they've got it
    set up so that drive letters are assigned to the specific physical drive
    as opposed to the device number off the bus (SCSI or IDE or whatever you
    happen to have).

    The way they should have set it up is so that the letter
    is assigned to partition x on device number y, so that it isn't tied to a
    physical drive as such. Then when you copied over to a new drive, once you
    pulled out the old drive, it would occupy the device number the old drive
    had had, so that the drive letter would map to the partition specified on
    the old drive. In fact, I don't think *any* configuration or settings should
    be tied to a specific physical instance of a piece of hardware, because then
    if that piece of hardware should fail, you could run into difficulties.
    That's just the most obvious shortcoming, and there are many others.

    >The cure depends on your facilities:

    I actually did manage to fix it last night. What I did is hack the registry.
    Drive letter assignments are in HKLM\SYSTEM\MountedDevices. You just edit
    the lines \DosDevices\<drive_letter>: so that their values match the
    corresponding value for the drive you wantin the \??\Volume{<vol_number>}
    entries. This you can do as long as you have a second barebones install
    of Win2K on the drive that will boot. Or you can do it with the old drive
    in place, editing the registry on the new drive. Anyway, what you do is run
    RegEdt32, choose Load Hive, load the system hive on the new drive into some
    key (you can call it anything you want) and then edit the MountedDevices
    value entries. Then unload the hive, take out your old drive, and reboot
    (or reboot into your main Win2K install if you're doing this from the barebones
    install on the new drive). Then the system will boot. Silly, but whatever.

    >About "reinstalling the system" not being an option: If this
    >is the case then you should seriously consider purchasing
    >an imaging product (Acronis, PQMagic) and take a snapshot
    >of your system. If you don't protect your investment then
    >you'll lose it sooner or later.

    Well, now that I've got the methodology I have an easy way of copying a drive.
    My honest experience with drive imaging or copying software is that although
    it generally works OK, it's often pretty idiosyncratic and frequently doesn't
    give you full flexibility in how you set up your new drive. Often times
    in addition they don't work when new drive standards come out, a frequent
    occurrence it seems these days, with newer, bigger capacities. (which seems
    to me like a failure of drive standardisation committees. Why can't they
    realise that it's necessary to design a standard that is valid for *infinite*
    drive capacity, bus width, data speed, etc...?)

    --
    Alex Rast
    ad.rast.7@nwnotlink.NOSPAM.com
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
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