Cloning my C Drive onto D...

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

My computer runs Win2K Professional. I have two hard drives, C & D. The
OS is installed on C.

Both HDs are quite small, and I'm in the process of replacing both.
As a first stage, because D was only 2GB(!), I've recently installed
a larger HD in its place (jumpered as "slave"). I've cloned the
existing C onto the new D (completely successfully), adjusted the BIOS
to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
almost...

The problem is, if I disconnect the C drive from the system (both
physically and through the BIOS), I get a "boot failure" message
from the BIOS when trying to start up, even though the BIOS is
configured to boot from IDE2.

Reconnect the C drive, and boot up from IDE2 goes ahead as normal. (I
know it is IDE2 - the D drive - that's booting by the way,
because at 7200rpm, boot up is considerably faster than from the old C
drive which runs at 5400.)

The C drive partition shows up as "active" in My Computer
management, the D partition as "system".

I would mention one other little snag, which I guess is probably
symptomatic of the main problem.

Even after a successful boot from the D drive, I'm unable to access
Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel. All I get is the message,
"mshta.exe has generated errors and will be closed by Windows. You
will need to restart the program. An error log is being created."

However, if I reboot from the C drive, Add/Remove Programs in Control
Panel reappears.

Can anyone offer some advice as to what I'm doing wrong? Once I have
a properly working OS on the new D drive, I'd like to remove the old
C, replace that, and transfer the my OS back. Or isn't this the best
way to go about it?

Any thoughts gratefully appreciated.
11 answers Last reply
More about cloning drive
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    You can't arbitrarily change the operating system drive letter. Best (and
    easiest) to back up your data and perform a clean install after the new
    drives are in place.

    To do a clean install, either boot the Windows 2000 install CD-Rom or setup
    disks. The set of four install disks can be created from your Windows 2000
    CD-Rom; change to the \bootdisk directory on the CD-Rom and execute
    makeboot.exe (from dos) or makebt32.exe (from 32 bit) and follow the
    prompts.

    When you get to the point, delete the existing NTFS and or other partitions
    found. After you delete the partition(s) abort the install, then again
    restart the pc booting the CD-Rom or setup disks to avoid unexpected drive
    letter assignments with your new install.

    Be sure to apply these to your new install before connecting to any network.

    http://download.microsoft.com/download/E/6/A/E6A04295-D2A8-40D0-A0C5-241BFECD095E/W2KSP4_EN.EXE
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/MS03-043.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/technet/security/bulletin/MS03-049.mspx

    --
    Regards,

    Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect

    "trevormidgley" wrote:
    | My computer runs Win2K Professional. I have two hard drives, C & D. The
    | OS is installed on C.
    |
    | Both HDs are quite small, and I'm in the process of replacing both.
    | As a first stage, because D was only 2GB(!), I've recently installed
    | a larger HD in its place (jumpered as "slave"). I've cloned the
    | existing C onto the new D (completely successfully), adjusted the BIOS
    | to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
    | almost...
    |
    | The problem is, if I disconnect the C drive from the system (both
    | physically and through the BIOS), I get a "boot failure" message
    | from the BIOS when trying to start up, even though the BIOS is
    | configured to boot from IDE2.
    |
    | Reconnect the C drive, and boot up from IDE2 goes ahead as normal. (I
    | know it is IDE2 - the D drive - that's booting by the way,
    | because at 7200rpm, boot up is considerably faster than from the old C
    | drive which runs at 5400.)
    |
    | The C drive partition shows up as "active" in My Computer
    | management, the D partition as "system".
    |
    | I would mention one other little snag, which I guess is probably
    | symptomatic of the main problem.
    |
    | Even after a successful boot from the D drive, I'm unable to access
    | Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel. All I get is the message,
    | "mshta.exe has generated errors and will be closed by Windows. You
    | will need to restart the program. An error log is being created."
    |
    | However, if I reboot from the C drive, Add/Remove Programs in Control
    | Panel reappears.
    |
    | Can anyone offer some advice as to what I'm doing wrong? Once I have
    | a properly working OS on the new D drive, I'd like to remove the old
    | C, replace that, and transfer the my OS back. Or isn't this the best
    | way to go about it?
    |
    | Any thoughts gratefully appreciated.
    |
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Thanks Dave -

    Problem is, I don't have and Win2K CD-ROM or setup disks - I bought
    this box second (or maybe third!) hand.

    In the absence of these, is there any way I can clone C onto another HD
    and have the new one as my OS drive.

    Thanks again -


    TM.
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    You can use something like this.

    http://www.symantec.com/sabu/ghost/ghost_personal/

    --
    Regards,

    Dave Patrick ....Please no email replies - reply in newsgroup.
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows]
    http://www.microsoft.com/protect

    "trevormidgley" wrote:
    | Thanks Dave -
    |
    | Problem is, I don't have and Win2K CD-ROM or setup disks - I bought
    | this box second (or maybe third!) hand.
    |
    | In the absence of these, is there any way I can clone C onto another HD
    | and have the new one as my OS drive.
    |
    | Thanks again -
    |
    |
    | TM.
    |
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Hi,

    You didn't say how you went about cloning your drive. If you use the
    Ghost programs clone option it'll make a bootable copy of your drive.
    Don't fool around with changing your bios to boot from the clone, move
    the drive physically to where the old drive was.

    .......It is important that you do NOT boot the machine with
    both disks inserted after cloning.

    That's not true. I clone my drive weekly and it's never been a problem
    having two identical drives in the system.

    ---==X={}=X==---


    Jim Self
    AVIATION ANIMATION, the internet's largest depository.
    http://avanimation.avsupport.com

    Your only internet source for spiral staircase plans.
    http://jself.com/stair/Stair.htm

    Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA)
    Technical Counselor
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    You can actually use EXPLORER or similar utility to copy all EXCEPT
    PAGEFILE.SYS to another drive...... ROOT C: to ROOT D: and then
    use your CD/BootDisks and run SETUP - REPAIR after you have
    swapped the drives so that the copy is now C:............

    I do this often with PowerDesk, a free version is available from :

    http://www.v-com.com/download/download_free.html


    I use it because PD allows Side by Side panels. The PRO version
    even has SYNC.

    http://www.v-com.com/product/PowerDesk_Pro_Home.html

    "trevormidgley" <trevormidgley@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:1114955454.593923.100510@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > My computer runs Win2K Professional. I have two hard drives, C & D. The
    > OS is installed on C.
    >
    > Both HDs are quite small, and I'm in the process of replacing both.
    > As a first stage, because D was only 2GB(!), I've recently installed
    > a larger HD in its place (jumpered as "slave"). I've cloned the
    > existing C onto the new D (completely successfully), adjusted the BIOS
    > to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
    > almost...
    >
    > The problem is, if I disconnect the C drive from the system (both
    > physically and through the BIOS), I get a "boot failure" message
    > from the BIOS when trying to start up, even though the BIOS is
    > configured to boot from IDE2.
    >
    > Reconnect the C drive, and boot up from IDE2 goes ahead as normal. (I
    > know it is IDE2 - the D drive - that's booting by the way,
    > because at 7200rpm, boot up is considerably faster than from the old C
    > drive which runs at 5400.)
    >
    > The C drive partition shows up as "active" in My Computer
    > management, the D partition as "system".
    >
    > I would mention one other little snag, which I guess is probably
    > symptomatic of the main problem.
    >
    > Even after a successful boot from the D drive, I'm unable to access
    > Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel. All I get is the message,
    > "mshta.exe has generated errors and will be closed by Windows. You
    > will need to restart the program. An error log is being created."
    >
    > However, if I reboot from the C drive, Add/Remove Programs in Control
    > Panel reappears.
    >
    > Can anyone offer some advice as to what I'm doing wrong? Once I have
    > a properly working OS on the new D drive, I'd like to remove the old
    > C, replace that, and transfer the my OS back. Or isn't this the best
    > way to go about it?
    >
    > Any thoughts gratefully appreciated.
    >
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    On 1 May 2005 06:50:54 -0700, "trevormidgley"
    <trevormidgley@ntlworld.com> wrote:

    >My computer runs Win2K Professional. I have two hard drives, C & D. The
    >OS is installed on C.
    >
    >Both HDs are quite small, and I'm in the process of replacing both.
    >As a first stage, because D was only 2GB(!), I've recently installed
    >a larger HD in its place (jumpered as "slave"). I've cloned the
    >existing C onto the new D (completely successfully), adjusted the BIOS
    >to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
    >almost...
    >
    >The problem is, if I disconnect the C drive from the system (both
    >physically and through the BIOS), I get a "boot failure" message
    >from the BIOS when trying to start up, even though the BIOS is
    >configured to boot from IDE2.

    The reason this happens is because you "adjusted the BIOS
    to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
    almost..." When you boot up with two "identical" (meaning having the
    same disk signatures) disks, the startup program (probably
    ntdetect.com) changes the disk signature of the second disk. Once this
    happens the second disk will not boot.

    The following scenario shows what happens:
    1. Make the clone.
    2. Save the MBR of the clone drive using the DOS version of MBRWizard
    <http://www.geocities.com/thestarman3/asm/mbr/BootToolsRefs.htm#TOOLS>.
    3. Boot from the old disk with the clone drive attached.
    4. Save the MBR of the clone drive again, and compare the Disk
    Signatures
    <http://www.geocities.com/thestarman3/asm/mbr/Win2kmbr.htm>.
    The Disk Signature of the clone has been changed, because Windows
    cannot operate with two identical drives.
    5. Boot from the clone with the old disk attached, and run Disk
    Management to see where the Page File is located. The old disk remains
    as drive C:, and the Page File is on the old disk, because the
    registry points to drive C:.
    6. Remove the old disk and boot from the clone. You may get a "cannot
    create Page File" error, or it just won't boot, because the Disk
    Signature in the MBR does not match the ones in the registry.
    7. Using the DOS version of MBRWizard restore the original MBR to the
    clone disk, and boot from the clone disk without the old disk
    attached. It boots okay and runs as C:.

    >
    >Reconnect the C drive, and boot up from IDE2 goes ahead as normal. (I
    >know it is IDE2 - the D drive - that's booting by the way,
    >because at 7200rpm, boot up is considerably faster than from the old C
    >drive which runs at 5400.)
    >
    >The C drive partition shows up as "active" in My Computer
    >management, the D partition as "system".
    >
    >I would mention one other little snag, which I guess is probably
    >symptomatic of the main problem.
    >
    >Even after a successful boot from the D drive, I'm unable to access
    >Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel. All I get is the message,
    >"mshta.exe has generated errors and will be closed by Windows. You
    >will need to restart the program. An error log is being created."
    >
    >However, if I reboot from the C drive, Add/Remove Programs in Control
    >Panel reappears.
    >
    >Can anyone offer some advice as to what I'm doing wrong? Once I have
    >a properly working OS on the new D drive, I'd like to remove the old
    >C, replace that, and transfer the my OS back. Or isn't this the best
    >way to go about it?
    >
    >Any thoughts gratefully appreciated.
  7. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Hi Pegasus.

    I've cloned my C drive onto D twice, both with equal success (or
    failure, depending on how you look at it!).

    First time was with HDClone, second time with DrvClonerXP. I tried the
    second program - having deleted all files from my D drive first - after
    the clone with HDClone produced the effects I've described. But
    DrvClonerXP produced just the same result.

    Maybe it's a lost cause, but I'm looking for a simple solution if there
    is one; or at least a step-by-step guide on how to get my Win2K Pro OS
    from C to D in such a way that D will be able to be redesignated Master
    HD.

    Thanks for your input -


    TM.


    ***********************

    Pegasus (MVP) wrote:
    > "trevormidgley" <trevormidgley@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > news:1114955454.593923.100510@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > > My computer runs Win2K Professional. I have two hard drives, C & D.
    The
    > > OS is installed on C.
    > >
    > > Both HDs are quite small, and I'm in the process of replacing both.
    > > As a first stage, because D was only 2GB(!), I've recently
    installed
    > > a larger HD in its place (jumpered as "slave"). I've cloned the
    > > existing C onto the new D (completely successfully), adjusted the
    BIOS
    > > to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
    > > almost...
    > >
    > > The problem is, if I disconnect the C drive from the system (both
    > > physically and through the BIOS), I get a "boot failure" message
    > > from the BIOS when trying to start up, even though the BIOS is
    > > configured to boot from IDE2.
    > >
    > > Reconnect the C drive, and boot up from IDE2 goes ahead as normal.
    (I
    > > know it is IDE2 - the D drive - that's booting by the way,
    > > because at 7200rpm, boot up is considerably faster than from the
    old C
    > > drive which runs at 5400.)
    > >
    > > The C drive partition shows up as "active" in My Computer
    > > management, the D partition as "system".
    > >
    > > I would mention one other little snag, which I guess is probably
    > > symptomatic of the main problem.
    > >
    > > Even after a successful boot from the D drive, I'm unable to access
    > > Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel. All I get is the message,
    > > "mshta.exe has generated errors and will be closed by Windows. You
    > > will need to restart the program. An error log is being created."
    > >
    > > However, if I reboot from the C drive, Add/Remove Programs in
    Control
    > > Panel reappears.
    > >
    > > Can anyone offer some advice as to what I'm doing wrong? Once I
    have
    > > a properly working OS on the new D drive, I'd like to remove the
    old
    > > C, replace that, and transfer the my OS back. Or isn't this the
    best
    > > way to go about it?
    > >
    > > Any thoughts gratefully appreciated.
    > >
    >
    > You write "I've cloned the existing C onto the new D (completely
    > successfully)" but you don't say how exactly you performed the
    > cloning process. Depending on how you did it, your cloning may
    > only be partitial.
    >
    > You have several options to clone a hard disk:
    > a) By using a commercial disk imaging program such as the one
    > suggested by Dave Patrick.
    > b) By using the cloning program downloadable from the home
    > site of your disk manufacturer (perhaps).
    > c) By Booting the machine with a Bart PE disk (www.bootdisk.com),
    > then using xcopy.exe to clone the disk.
    > d) By temporarily installing both disks as slave disks in another
    > Win2000/XP machine, the using xcopy.exe.
    >
    > Option c) and d) are somewhat laborious in that you will have
    > to restore the Win2000 boot environment.
    >
    > It is important that you do NOT boot the machine with
    > both disks inserted after cloning.
  8. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    "trevormidgley" <trevormidgley@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:1114955454.593923.100510@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > My computer runs Win2K Professional. I have two hard drives, C & D. The
    > OS is installed on C.
    >
    > Both HDs are quite small, and I'm in the process of replacing both.
    > As a first stage, because D was only 2GB(!), I've recently installed
    > a larger HD in its place (jumpered as "slave"). I've cloned the
    > existing C onto the new D (completely successfully), adjusted the BIOS
    > to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
    > almost...
    >
    > The problem is, if I disconnect the C drive from the system (both
    > physically and through the BIOS), I get a "boot failure" message
    > from the BIOS when trying to start up, even though the BIOS is
    > configured to boot from IDE2.
    >
    > Reconnect the C drive, and boot up from IDE2 goes ahead as normal. (I
    > know it is IDE2 - the D drive - that's booting by the way,
    > because at 7200rpm, boot up is considerably faster than from the old C
    > drive which runs at 5400.)
    >
    > The C drive partition shows up as "active" in My Computer
    > management, the D partition as "system".
    >
    > I would mention one other little snag, which I guess is probably
    > symptomatic of the main problem.
    >
    > Even after a successful boot from the D drive, I'm unable to access
    > Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel. All I get is the message,
    > "mshta.exe has generated errors and will be closed by Windows. You
    > will need to restart the program. An error log is being created."
    >
    > However, if I reboot from the C drive, Add/Remove Programs in Control
    > Panel reappears.
    >
    > Can anyone offer some advice as to what I'm doing wrong? Once I have
    > a properly working OS on the new D drive, I'd like to remove the old
    > C, replace that, and transfer the my OS back. Or isn't this the best
    > way to go about it?
    >
    > Any thoughts gratefully appreciated.
    >

    You write "I've cloned the existing C onto the new D (completely
    successfully)" but you don't say how exactly you performed the
    cloning process. Depending on how you did it, your cloning may
    only be partitial.

    You have several options to clone a hard disk:
    a) By using a commercial disk imaging program such as the one
    suggested by Dave Patrick.
    b) By using the cloning program downloadable from the home
    site of your disk manufacturer (perhaps).
    c) By Booting the machine with a Bart PE disk (www.bootdisk.com),
    then using xcopy.exe to clone the disk.
    d) By temporarily installing both disks as slave disks in another
    Win2000/XP machine, the using xcopy.exe.

    Option c) and d) are somewhat laborious in that you will have
    to restore the Win2000 boot environment.

    It is important that you do NOT boot the machine with
    both disks inserted after cloning.
  9. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    If you boot the machine with both disks inserted then
    you run the risk of Windows re-assigning its drive letters.
    You won't notice it while both disks are inserted but
    you certainly will when you remove one of them.

    It does not happen on each machine but it ***can***.

    "PA20Pilot" <PA20Pilot@faa.gov> wrote in message
    news:%23S6YXUsTFHA.2680@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
    > Hi,
    >
    > You didn't say how you went about cloning your drive. If you use the
    > Ghost programs clone option it'll make a bootable copy of your drive.
    > Don't fool around with changing your bios to boot from the clone, move
    > the drive physically to where the old drive was.
    >
    > ......It is important that you do NOT boot the machine with
    > both disks inserted after cloning.
    >
    > That's not true. I clone my drive weekly and it's never been a problem
    > having two identical drives in the system.
    >
    > ---==X={}=X==---
    >
    >
    > Jim Self
    > AVIATION ANIMATION, the internet's largest depository.
    > http://avanimation.avsupport.com
    >
    > Your only internet source for spiral staircase plans.
    > http://jself.com/stair/Stair.htm
    >
    > Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA)
    > Technical Counselor
    >
    >
  10. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Hi Pegasus,

    ..........If you boot the machine with both disks inserted then you run
    the risk of Windows re-assigning its drive letters. You won't notice it
    while both disks are inserted but you certainly will when you remove one
    of them.


    When you run Norton Ghost it stops Windows, restarts the computer, does
    its thing, then reboots and restarts into Windows. The program makes the
    choice to boot with both disks installed, it's not a user option to pull
    one during the cloning process or trying to do it before Ghost reboots
    into Windoze.

    I think as long as the cloned too disk is jumpered as a slave or set to
    cable select there won't be any problems with Windoze being too stupid
    to figure which one contains the operating system.

    When the clone copy disk is used to write back/clone back, to the
    primary disk, Ghost asks if you really want to overwrite the Windoze
    operating system. Between Norton Ghost and Windoze I think they have the
    situation well under control and worring about booting with a cloned
    copy in there too is a no brainer for the user. Ghost is the only
    software I've used so what you've said about being careful is probably
    good advice with some programs, however Ghost 2003 hasn't been a problem
    in the computers I've installed it in.

    My primary/master disk is C, D and E. My CD/DVD if F. When I run Ghost
    my secondary disk is temporily assigned drive letters G,H and I. When I
    take that secondary disk and change its jumper to master and install it
    in place of my primary/master HD it's assigned the letters C, D and F
    just as the original disk had. It really is a clone, an exact copy of
    the original.

    ---==X={}=X==---


    Jim Self
    AVIATION ANIMATION, the internet's largest depository.
    http://avanimation.avsupport.com

    Your only internet source for spiral staircase plans.
    http://jself.com/stair/Stair.htm

    Experimental Aircraft Association (EAA)
    Technical Counselor
  11. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    I am not familiar with HDClone or DrvConerXP. I only know
    DriveImage (PowerQuest), TrueImage (Acronis) and Ghost
    (Norton). Are these commercial or freeware programs?

    If you are reluctant to purchase one of the above programs
    (I would select TrueImage) then you could use options c)
    or d) (see my previous reply). Option c) requires another
    Win2000/XP desktop PC. Option d) requires a CD burner
    and a loan of a WinXP Professional CD (but no licence
    number).

    What's your preference?


    "trevormidgley" <trevormidgley@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    news:1115042056.994562.168240@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > Hi Pegasus.
    >
    > I've cloned my C drive onto D twice, both with equal success (or
    > failure, depending on how you look at it!).
    >
    > First time was with HDClone, second time with DrvClonerXP. I tried the
    > second program - having deleted all files from my D drive first - after
    > the clone with HDClone produced the effects I've described. But
    > DrvClonerXP produced just the same result.
    >
    > Maybe it's a lost cause, but I'm looking for a simple solution if there
    > is one; or at least a step-by-step guide on how to get my Win2K Pro OS
    > from C to D in such a way that D will be able to be redesignated Master
    > HD.
    >
    > Thanks for your input -
    >
    >
    > TM.
    >
    >
    > ***********************
    >
    > Pegasus (MVP) wrote:
    > > "trevormidgley" <trevormidgley@ntlworld.com> wrote in message
    > > news:1114955454.593923.100510@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
    > > > My computer runs Win2K Professional. I have two hard drives, C & D.
    > The
    > > > OS is installed on C.
    > > >
    > > > Both HDs are quite small, and I'm in the process of replacing both.
    > > > As a first stage, because D was only 2GB(!), I've recently
    > installed
    > > > a larger HD in its place (jumpered as "slave"). I've cloned the
    > > > existing C onto the new D (completely successfully), adjusted the
    > BIOS
    > > > to boot up from IDE2 (my D drive), and everything works fine -
    > > > almost...
    > > >
    > > > The problem is, if I disconnect the C drive from the system (both
    > > > physically and through the BIOS), I get a "boot failure" message
    > > > from the BIOS when trying to start up, even though the BIOS is
    > > > configured to boot from IDE2.
    > > >
    > > > Reconnect the C drive, and boot up from IDE2 goes ahead as normal.
    > (I
    > > > know it is IDE2 - the D drive - that's booting by the way,
    > > > because at 7200rpm, boot up is considerably faster than from the
    > old C
    > > > drive which runs at 5400.)
    > > >
    > > > The C drive partition shows up as "active" in My Computer
    > > > management, the D partition as "system".
    > > >
    > > > I would mention one other little snag, which I guess is probably
    > > > symptomatic of the main problem.
    > > >
    > > > Even after a successful boot from the D drive, I'm unable to access
    > > > Add/Remove Programs in Control Panel. All I get is the message,
    > > > "mshta.exe has generated errors and will be closed by Windows. You
    > > > will need to restart the program. An error log is being created."
    > > >
    > > > However, if I reboot from the C drive, Add/Remove Programs in
    > Control
    > > > Panel reappears.
    > > >
    > > > Can anyone offer some advice as to what I'm doing wrong? Once I
    > have
    > > > a properly working OS on the new D drive, I'd like to remove the
    > old
    > > > C, replace that, and transfer the my OS back. Or isn't this the
    > best
    > > > way to go about it?
    > > >
    > > > Any thoughts gratefully appreciated.
    > > >
    > >
    > > You write "I've cloned the existing C onto the new D (completely
    > > successfully)" but you don't say how exactly you performed the
    > > cloning process. Depending on how you did it, your cloning may
    > > only be partitial.
    > >
    > > You have several options to clone a hard disk:
    > > a) By using a commercial disk imaging program such as the one
    > > suggested by Dave Patrick.
    > > b) By using the cloning program downloadable from the home
    > > site of your disk manufacturer (perhaps).
    > > c) By Booting the machine with a Bart PE disk (www.bootdisk.com),
    > > then using xcopy.exe to clone the disk.
    > > d) By temporarily installing both disks as slave disks in another
    > > Win2000/XP machine, the using xcopy.exe.
    > >
    > > Option c) and d) are somewhat laborious in that you will have
    > > to restore the Win2000 boot environment.
    > >
    > > It is important that you do NOT boot the machine with
    > > both disks inserted after cloning.
    >
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