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new computer, old harddrive?

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December 26, 2006 3:49:20 AM

i would like to know if i have to reformat and reinstall xp when i take my old harddrive out of my old computer, into my new one? or can i just install the drivers for my new mobo, plug it into my new computer, and im good to go?

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December 26, 2006 5:44:43 AM

I did the old hard drive to new computer thing and for a while it was ok.
On my system the drivers were almost the same, with the exception of the sound drivers and the network drivers.
But after a while it started to give errors, so I went and redid the software load to the system from scratch.
I did not lose any info on the computer, it just became less stable.
I would say it's best to start from scratch.

If you have stuff you do not wish to lose, save it and then give it a try. If the mobo drivers are radically different from what you are currently using, you most likely will have trouble.

If your XP software is on an install disk like from Dell or some such then you will have to do an I386 rip and slipstreem to another cd/dvd.
Though not impossible, it does present many challenges.
Here Google will be your friend. If XP is OEM, Microsoft Windows Activation might give you trouble.

Good luck and have fun.
Anonymous
a b G Storage
December 26, 2006 11:11:22 AM

You will probably have to do a Repait installation of Windows XP.

Grumpy
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December 26, 2006 5:01:34 PM

if its SATA you're very likely to not be able to boot due to controller drivers (or the lack thereof) if its ATA then it'll boot but want all the new drivers.

back up your data and give it a shot... most likely you'll be reinstalling it, but whatever! :) 
December 26, 2006 6:00:56 PM

It's always better to reinstall from scratch: simply swapping the HD and updating the drivers quite always leads to many errors and instability.
December 26, 2006 6:33:52 PM

Here is a good default rule:

IF YOU SNEEZE AROUND WINDOWS IT WILL REQUIRE A FRESH INSTALL.

:lol:  Any time you change hardware on that god-forsaken operating system, Windows either won't boot or will boot and say you have 2 days to re-activate which then requires you to talk to Habeeb in Bangladesh which makes your life hell for an hour.

Like others, I have done the new parts, old install thing and eventually things go to hell slowly but surely. I went from a Socket-A to a Socket-939 and things took a $#!t so bad I couldn't even post. I removed my RAM from my current set-up to check a buddies system for problems and after putting it back in Windows somehow knew this and demanded that I reactivate before doing anything...I hope God has mercy on Bill Gates soul.

Faithful WinXP user,
December 26, 2006 7:18:33 PM

Quote:
i would like to know if i have to reformat and reinstall xp when i take my old harddrive out of my old computer, into my new one? or can i just install the drivers for my new mobo, plug it into my new computer, and im good to go?

Here's my suggestions for what they are worth. I realize they echo some of what has already been posted so I'll try to "wave my hands" as I type to add some extra "atmosphere". :oops: 

First, I think just "installing the new drivers" is probably a very bad idea. I have no idea exactly what dependencies Windows has on your hardware that are not covered by updating your hardware drivers, but I'm willing to bet they do exist. So ...

Second, yes, definitely do a "repair install" by booting from your Windows install CD. This should preserve your existing configuration of installed programs and Windows settings while at the same time completely redo your Windows hardware install.

A caveat. You definitely want to do the install with a version of the Windows CD which contains the SP2 updates. If your install CD does not include SP2, then slipstream SP2 and burn a new install CD. (Instructions for how to do this should be easy to find by doing a Google search on, for example, "Windows slipstream SP2"). The reason you want to do this is to try to avoid the possible problems with SATA a prev poster referred to. Using a Windows SP2 install CD is not a guarantee you won't have Windows SATA driver problems, but it's your best first step to avoiding them.

Another caveat: Backup your data before doing the install. Not the first time you've heard this, naturally, but it has to be said every time someone writes a post like this. (Even though you'll probably just ignore the advice! :wink:) 

My third and final comment is that if none of the above works as hoped, you can always then do a complete scratch install. The bottom line to me is that you probably loose very little by doing a "repair install" vs a scratch/clean install of Windows. If it works, you've saved yourself the hassle of redoing your entire Windows setup. What's not to like?

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
December 31, 2006 10:47:05 PM

Let me tell of my positive experiences with swapping a motherboard while using the old hard drives.

A friend of my son had a computer I built for him out of old stuff I had laying around. I used an Asrock AMD motherboard with a Sis chipset and an Athlon XP 2600+. His OS is Windows XP Pro, no service packs. He had a lot of games on the second hard drive (80 Gig) with the primary hard drive with the OS on it being 6 Gigs.

I got an ECS PT800CE motherboard with an Intel P4 2.53G processor with a Via chipset.

When I booted the hard drive, windows started up and started finding new hardware. I had previously downloaded all the drivers and a bios update for the board and burned them to a CD, along with the board manual and the raid manual. It didn't take long to update the drivers and I made sure there were no yellow bangs in control panel/system. The computer boots just fine and I was able to use a windows flash utility to update the bios. Granted the ages of the boards aren't very different, although the chip sets are from two different vendors.

I was prepared to wipe the drives and start fresh, but I found I did not need to do so. I see no issues with the computer so far.

I will grant that I'm pretty bold by going into the registry to find and delete references to any of the old board hardware. On this particular box, though, I didn't do so on the principle of, if it aint broke, don't touch it.

I get this old hardware from a neighbor who does system repairs and when it gets down to it, even a modest computer is handy enough for a lot of folks still today. I am so used to Windows XP, having used it since it first came out, yet I'm still surprised at how it is sometimes easy to make major changes like swapping a motherboard without having issues.

At the very least, try to boot with your old hard drive, for if you can load windows, even with some hardware issues, you have the opportunity to back up anything you want to save before you do a wipe. You may have done that step before the swap, but if you have a computer you have used a long time, you may not remember some of the things you have saved that you didn't think of backing up. In the era of huge hard drives, it's more than just a closet of junk any more, it's more like a whole house worth of junk, making an analogy.
January 4, 2007 12:58:33 AM

If you install an old hard drive with a previously installed copy of OS and old MoBo and all other hardware drivers onto a new MoBo, install new MoBo drivers / software, and attempt to run it without formatting and reinstalling OS and drivers, you are begging for grief. And, as ye ask, ye shall recieve. It may be possible to do this, but sooner rather than later, the system will crash and burn. I speak from bitter, skin-of-my-back experience here.

Assuming that you have kept the bulk of your existing hardware peripherals (video, sound and other cards, printer, etc), you may get lucky and be able to run successfully for a while.

The problem is that very deeply buried drivers for the old MoBo will eventually conflict with the new drivers, leading to random and extremely difficult to trouble-shoot conflicts. Even something as simple as changing the brand of video card is enough to require a wipe and re-install. MoBo change is much more comprehensive wrt drivers and software and connections.

Bite the bullet and do what is necessary. You asked, you got an honest answer, based on hard-won experience. If you don't like it, too bad, so sad. It is your choice and responsibilty, after all. Just remember, a system crash due to driver conflicts can lead to data loss. How much time and effort have you invested in searching for and downloading selected files, not to mention creating assorted files - spreadsheets, documents etc.? How much is your time and effort worth, especially if you haven't backed all these files up?
January 4, 2007 3:14:49 AM

Hey Wizard,

Are you talking about magic software or something? What is deeply buried that will cause grief? Hardware drivers have names that can easily searched for and removed from the registry. CPL files that show up in control panel can be deleted. If there are no yellow bangs in device manager, then I don't know of any hidden issues that would cause problems later.

Using the OS disc that I included with the machine and running a repair will let windows boot on a different motherboard as it will poll the bios and install the drivers that it found.

I am aware of so-called OS decay. Is this what you are talking about? I have machines that are running for years and the hardware is so obsolete that when they crash it's not worth fixing, but they still boot and work.

I do understand where you are coming from, though. You can't go from one generation of mobo to two or three generations later; that won't work. What I did was more or less a lateral move, albeit going from an AMD platform to an Intel platform. I also understand that it is more programs that are constantly installed and uninstalled where conflict issues normally arise. When you get those hangs from buggy programs and have to do a hard shut down, well, that's an opportunity to corrupt a file.

The more you know about software, though, the less catastrophic it can be.

I also understand where you are coming from as far as the grief of losing work software or files that were important to you and for backing those files. I was upgrading a game machine for a kid, after all. If it crashes then I can do a wipe and the only thing lost was saved game files.
January 4, 2007 4:59:38 AM

Quote:
Hey Wizard,

Are you talking about magic software or something? What is deeply buried that will cause grief? Hardware drivers have names that can easily searched for and removed from the registry. CPL files that show up in control panel can be deleted. If there are no yellow bangs in device manager, then I don't know of any hidden issues that would cause problems later.

Ummm . no magic software. THG article long time ago raised this issue, and bottom-line recommendatioon was wipe and re-install. And context was video card drivers when switching from ATI to nVidea and vice versa. Ypur comment abot seqarching the registry for drvers and removing yjem is optimistic. As for uninstaslls, well, experience has shown that Windows does a poor job of this. Yellow flags in Device Manager are not necessarily present when there is a problem with corrupted or conflicting driver files. I have direct experience with this "leetle eeessue".

Using the OS disc that I included with the machine and running a repair will let windows boot on a different motherboard as it will poll the bios and install the drivers that it found.

It depends on what version of Windows we are talking about.

I am aware of so-called OS decay. Is this what you are talking about? I have machines that are running for years and the hardware is so obsolete that when they crash it's not worth fixing, but they still boot and work.

OS decay is one issue. Another issue is that most versions of Windows absolutely require a hard reboot of the sdystem every 40 to 60 days due to memory leakage issues, amomg others, that are effectively hard-coded into the OS. Note that Linux does NOT have these problems.

I do understand where you are coming from, though. You can't go from one generation of mobo to two or three generations later; that won't work. What I did was more or less a lateral move, albeit going from an AMD platform to an Intel platform. I also understand that it is more programs that are constantly installed and uninstalled where conflict issues normally arise. When you get those hangs from buggy programs and have to do a hard shut down, well, that's an opportunity to corrupt a file.

Well, it is nice to see that you agree on a large scale. I based my comments and observations on personal experience with something as apparantly trivial as copying the entire contents of a smaller hard disk to a larger disk and watching a boot / system failure due to a discrepancy in the hard drive size. Windows does some very strange and stupid things. My personal appraoch is very cautious and consertvative based on a number of very unpleasant experiences. So far, I have not seen anything to indicate that XP performs any better than earlier versions.

The more you know about software, though, the less catastrophic it can be.

Well, you're right, except that Stuff Happens. It's another one of those cases of "A Beautifal Theory Destroyed By an Ugly Little Fact". Once bitten, twice bitten, no third time.

I also understand where you are coming from as far as the grief of losing work software or files that were important to you and for backing those files. I was upgrading a game machine for a kid, after all. If it crashes then I can do a wipe and the only thing lost was saved game files.


You would be amazed at how important those saved game files can be to a kid. I am concerned by the cavalier attitude you show. When it comes down to it, I find it difficult to justify not doing a wipe and re-instasll when any significant hardware change has occured. Especially when comparing the amount of time required to recreate and re-download any data files.
January 4, 2007 6:14:13 AM

As with all written communication, it can be easily mis-understood. I am not cavalier about a kid losing his saved games. He had already given me permission to wipe his hard drive. I decided to boot the computer after I proved the motherboard worked (I used to work for a chip making company and troubleshot pc board failures as a job (meaning component and software failures). I was surprised the Windows XP PRO SP1 came up just fine and there were just a few issues of it automatically detecting new hardware. I considered myself lucky.

I'll let you know if there are any issues down the road. Currently the machine is sitting on the floor in storage since he wants me to keep the machine safe from his thieving brother who would steal it if he left it at home.
January 4, 2007 6:47:07 AM

Quote:
Here is a good default rule:

IF YOU SNEEZE AROUND WINDOWS IT WILL REQUIRE A FRESH INSTALL.




HaHaHa!!! Thats a good one. :wink: I better stock up on kleenex.
January 4, 2007 7:16:54 AM

Sometimes you can, no issues. Sometimes you can't. Pretend you can't, do a good backup, then try.

OTOH, I re-install the OS (xp, anyway) about twice a year anyway, depending on how many new programs, drivers, etc. I've installed. So for me its a non-issue.
January 4, 2007 7:26:01 AM

I would do it like this:

Run sysprep on old computer, put the harddrive into the new computer, let windows set itself up again... I've done it like this a couple of times, has worked.

what is wrong with this approach ?
January 8, 2007 3:04:24 AM

Quote:
As with all written communication, it can be easily mis-understood. I am not cavalier about a kid losing his saved games. He had already given me permission to wipe his hard drive.

Well, that's good to know. You perhaps begin to see why my posts tend to be what some would call "verbose" and "too long". I am attempting to aviod "mis-understandings" - this means details.


I decided to boot the computer after I proved the motherboard worked (I used to work for a chip making company and troubleshot pc board failures as a job (meaning component and software failures). I was surprised the Windows XP PRO SP1 came up just fine and there were just a few issues of it automatically detecting new hardware. I considered myself lucky.

Sheer Dumb Luck rears its ugly effing head again!

I'll let you know if there are any issues down the road. Currently the machine is sitting on the floor in storage since he wants me to keep the machine safe from his thieving brother who would steal it if he left it at home.


Good luck, hope it works and you don't need to use normal measures, but I wouldn't hold my breath.
January 8, 2007 3:45:04 AM

There is a simple principle of, if it aint broke, don't fix it.

Like I said, I was prepared to do a wipe. Just because I figured it can't hurt I let Windows load. I know enough to make sure that the System applet shows what hardware is on the machine and drivers are running it. I did install the drivers for the hardware on that board that I had already burned to a CD. I also installed the chipset drivers and updated the BIOS. I even overclocked the machine a bit.

If the BIOS setting are optimized; If Windows is happy, then what problems can be hidden? Software problems caused by corrupted files can be fixed by reinstalls. Many times instability is caused by programs that conflict with each other. Part of the fun, for me, is keeping my system running for as many months as I want until I decide to reformat and start over. I've found most instability is caused by constantly installing more programs and un installing others. I've pruned my registry many times already of orphaned settings. For all the warnings I've heard over the years about being careful in the registry, I've learned what things you can delete and what things you better had not touch.
January 8, 2007 2:14:55 PM

When the system takes a shit, come back and talk to us...cause its going to happen
January 8, 2007 2:37:28 PM

Sata prob not due to diff controllers IDE you could do that but it will almost certainly lead to errors of some sort as windows does not like complete hardware changes like that
January 8, 2007 3:05:11 PM

It took M$ a long time, but they have addressed this issue. How to replace the motherboard on a computer that is running Windows Server 2003, Windows XP, or Windows 2000.

My other two cents:
I replaced a KT600 based MB with a nforce 2 based one and the OS blew up. That was about a year ago and although I had searched for info, I had not found anything like the above link. When I finally got done doing a new install (actually a side-by-side), it re-activated without any input from me!
Your success will depend on how different the chipsets are, and going to an Intel chipset, IMHO, will increase your chance of success. (Intel support is native) If the old chipset was VIA based (shutter), IMHO, start over!
January 8, 2007 6:21:46 PM


Nice link! Thanks! If nothing else it does provide an ounce more confidence that if you do perform a so-called repair install then the correct HAL (Hardware Abstraction Layer) will be installed.

I personally have my doubts that if you simply "update the drivers" or count on Windows to detect new hardware this will (completely) happen. But I have also assumed that doing a repair install would re-detect everything correctly. Of course, this being Windows you never really know. :)  But it's still nice to see that Microsoft also apparently endorses the efficacy of the repair install.

-john, the redundant legacy dinosaur
January 8, 2007 11:50:06 PM

Quote:
There is a simple principle of, if it aint broke, don't fix it.

Like I said, I was prepared to do a wipe. Just because I figured it can't hurt I let Windows load. I know enough to make sure that the System applet shows what hardware is on the machine and drivers are running it. I did install the drivers for the hardware on that board that I had already burned to a CD. I also installed the chipset drivers and updated the BIOS. I even overclocked the machine a bit.

If the BIOS setting are optimized; If Windows is happy, then what problems can be hidden? Software problems caused by corrupted files can be fixed by reinstalls. Many times instability is caused by programs that conflict with each other. Part of the fun, for me, is keeping my system running for as many months as I want until I decide to reformat and start over. I've found most instability is caused by constantly installing more programs and un installing others. I've pruned my registry many times already of orphaned settings. For all the warnings I've heard over the years about being careful in the registry, I've learned what things you can delete and what things you better had not touch.


Ummm... And what perception-altering substances have you been imbibing lately? And just how long have you actually been working with Microsoft operating systems? Perhaps I, and the rest of the good readership of these forums, could impose on you to buy lottery tickets for us, as you are apparently one extremely lucky individual. And just how do you know "it ain't broke"?

I have direct experience with the following trivial and stupid issues with Windows:

1) new versions of DirectX break existing, installed and functional games. Installation order of games and drivers and DirectX versions is critical to games working.

2) "Critical" security patches break applications that worked just fine before, never mind "optional" patches like Media Player. And there is no way to uninstall the patch, and reinstalling the app doesn't fix the problem. Wipe, reinstall OS, Patches, Drivers and then Apps and App patches, in the correct order, is the only way to fix problem.

3) Security holes remaining running sores in old versions of assorted MS OSes and Apps. This before we discuss security issues with "new, improved" versions that not only fail to address known and ancient problems in the "old" versions, but carry them into the new version. MS is notorious for this. OOOPPPPSS!

I can give lots more examples and cases of problems.

When not only experienced individuals like other posters here and myself, but hard-core test sites like Tom's hardware Guide, strongly recommend that changes to hardware as trivial as changing the brand of Video card require a wipe and reinstall of Windows, you should do the following: Pay very close attention, be very quiet, and carefully consider what you are saying. You would also be extremely wise to stop bragging about how lucky you have been so far - trust me, this won't continue. You should also stop saying that your individual experience outweighs the collective, long-term experience of the community.
January 9, 2007 5:00:11 AM

I might suggest that 30+ years of working with computer operating systems and programs might make me somewhat experienced. I was a beta tester for many years so I know more about bugs and changes that break things than a lot of folks, I would think. I admit, too, that there have been some problems that I have not been able to figure out. That said, I'm confidant enough that once I get a system built and all the software configured it works until someone changes something and if that happens, almost every time I was able to fix it with a software change by either uinstalling, rebooting then reinstalling the buggy software or figuring out program A does not play well with program B, and showed the user it was better to use progam A with program C instead.

Here I am in this thread simply saying I was lucky this time. What's the crime in that? Do you hate it that some people are lucky? Do you assume you know much more about operating systems and programs than I do? Do you assume I'm clueless? It matters not, but I do think I may be just the exception that proves the rule.

And as far as knowing it aint broke: If I can boot the machine day in and day out and it boots the same way successfully and I can use the programs I use all day for 12 to 16 hours a day and it all works, then I turn it off at night and turn it back on the next day to do it all again without any errors. That said I've had programs freeze on me. A reboot has almost always fixed whatever glitch occurred.

I do know how fragile a software/hardware plaform can be. Memory is not error-correcting; memory is unified and the OS does not run in it's own memory space like a mainframe does, so no program can crash the OS since it can't even seen the memory the OS is running in. Even the most critically tested and debugged software in the world has shown that a bug can still hide. The example of that is Apollo 11. When the lander was descending, the radar was not working for some reason. With great trepidation, the astronaut turned the breaker off for that radar and back on again. The radar then worked. Afterwards sofware engineers determined that a bug had the radar focused at infinity and stuck like that and that is the reason that the radar was not giving the critical distance detection they needed.

Another thing, if I can leave a system on 24/7 for months on end and nothing crashes, can I say it aint broke? There are millions of servers around the world that run like that for years without ever being shut down and they run reliably. Hardware becomes so obsolete that the systems, when they are shut down, are ripped out and new ones put into their place.

Of course, personal computers are a different story. Cosmic rays can flip a bit in a memory chip on a memory module. If that bit is part of the OS, it can cause a blue screen. Only a lead shield would protect a computer from cosmic rays. Some hardware issues are with systems running at such speeds that signal crosstalk exists on a motherboard and just every once in a while one bit is crossing and another trace picks it up and flips a bit on an unrelated memory path. Some bugs like that can't be found easily. In software/hardware testing some types of bugs with a known signature don't show for 1000 hours of running. You can reliably trigger the bug, but it takes literally running a script for 1000 hours before its triggered. On a home computer you get a freeze, crash or whatever and you think it's magic.

I have a four year old cell phone. It froze on me once. It's been on 24/7 for all that time, otherwise. It's software in that phone. Can I say that it aint broke?

If I can run Prime 95 24 hours, most folks would say a system is stable. Would you agree to that? Would you say it aint broke?

What exactly makes a system unreliable? It's not magic, its simple yet its frustrating. It's only data being passed from one device to one chip to another to the processor and back to memory then back to another chip that back to the device. Data runs all over. It's all ones and zeros, but it's all there is. Yet a computer can amaze me even today, when I can fix it if the hardware fails, down to the component level. I mean, even removing surface mount parts and replacing them. I did it for a living.
January 9, 2007 1:46:51 PM

Quote:
i would like to know if i have to reformat and reinstall xp when i take my old harddrive out of my old computer, into my new one? or can i just install the drivers for my new mobo, plug it into my new computer, and im good to go?

Short answer, Yes you can.

The link given by RTS_fan is a good thing to follow.
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/824125/en-us

If a simple repair job works, then go for it. (I've tried it and it has worked for me in certain situations, and it has also failed in certain situations.)

If it doesnt, lesson learned plus added experience, and you have to reformat anyway. Big whoop. At worst case you are out an hour by trying the repair method.

Good luck.
Topic Dead.
January 10, 2007 2:32:10 AM

Well, I concede that you have more direct experience with some of this stuff than I do. I have never been a Beta tester, and 30+ years is more than I have. Your general experience and overall superiority to my experience is humbly acknowledged.

I do not, however, conceede that your luck in some cases invalidates my direct experience that contradicts what you say. I do have some experience with both general and specialized software in the Windows environment. Also hardware issues.

You said: "That said, I'm confidant enough that once I get a system built and all the software configured it works until someone changes something and if that happens, almost every time I was able to fix it with a software change by either uinstalling, rebooting then reinstalling the buggy software or figuring out program A does not play well with program B, and showed the user it was better to use progam A with program C instead." I note that you haven't addressed issues like new versions of DirectX breaking older games etc or new "critical" Windows patches breaking current versions of MS (never mind other brands) software. And I also note that you fail to address the issue of "Program B is what I need and "Program C" just doesn't make it - for whatever reason".

Luck is not something to count on, especially in any "mission-critical" situation.

Your other points are noted, respected and acknowledged. I have also had occasion to observe the points you mention. But, as I noted in my previous post, I have also had numerous opportunities to observe and directly experience both software and hardware "issues" with many incarnations of Windows.

So you were lucky - so what?. Your depending on luck and making negative comments about other posts because they take the position that depending on luck is not only dangerous, but foolish is not impressive. Underwhelming in fact.

I have yet to legitimately hear of, or observe, any version of Windows that can be run for "months on end, 24/7". Never mind my own direct experience with Windows 9x, ME, 2000 and XP: MS itself has admited that several versions of Windows MUST be rebooted every 40 days (max). But what the EFF do I know? Your luck is better than everything. Who are you trying to kid?

Your question about what makes a system reliable is clearly one of them there rhetorical ones. If you want to know, compare Linux to any version of Windows.
January 10, 2007 2:52:01 AM

I think I'll try an experiment. Since I have a perfectly good but older PC sitting around I think I'll hook it up, turn it on and leave it and see how many days it stays running without locking up or shutting down. I'll turn off power management so the system is always running and I'll run a screen saver just to keep the monitor happy. I'll get back to you in a couple of month or so if 40 days is par.
January 10, 2007 3:28:58 AM

Just my 2 cents. My roommate bought a Raptor and told me he didnt want to reinstall the OS. I asked him why he got the raptor. He was using an IDE drive. He stated that he wanted it so that he could get the mp3's and movies to play faster. I explained to him that he would benifit much more from installing the OS on the Raptor and doing it that way. He didn't listen. His PC crashed and gave him all kinds of errors. I didnt help him fix it. He didnt listen. I told him i dont know whats wrong. That way went ahead and installed the OS on the raptor. He then said to me "man im glad i reinstalled the OS like i was thinking" whatever... Moral of the story. Back up your stuff you wanna save, reload the OS. Why not have a fresh install with new hardware?
January 10, 2007 3:33:09 AM

Quote:
I think I'll try an experiment. Since I have a perfectly good but older PC sitting around I think I'll hook it up, turn it on and leave it and see how many days it stays running without locking up or shutting down. I'll turn off power management so the system is always running and I'll run a screen saver just to keep the monitor happy. I'll get back to you in a couple of month or so if 40 days is par.


Well you haven't said what specific version of Windows you are running on this system. But if it's 9X or ME, 40 days is your "BINGO POINT" - as admitted by MS themeselves.

If it's Win2K, the time will be more along the lines of 2 to 4 months, and XP is good for a minimum of 6 to 8 months.

I think this discussion would best be continued in PM mode, as there is a danger the thread may be hi-jacked. More to the point, I really don't feel like getting into a pissing conterst with you - it isn't worth the time or effort

You and I don't entirely agree, lets leave it at that and stop wasting everyone elses time and resources here.

Sayonra
January 10, 2007 3:43:32 AM

And you are surprised because? Some people are Darwin Award Candidates.

I am sorry that your friend is one of them, but remember, you are not responsible for him. You can advise, suggest, cajole, plead, beg etc., but regardless of how much you may love your buddy, and how much he may love you, he is responsible for himself, as you are responsible for yourself. As I am responsible for myself.

I hope that your buddy grows up and deals with reality, but until then, stay frosty and look up some of the prionciples of the Twelve-Step programmes.
June 10, 2009 10:37:49 PM

I believe PCGamer did an article on how to swap systems, something about deleting old hardware from the registry and rebooting and xp will act as though you just installed a fresh copy of windows. dont do it how i described, but it may be worth looking at that article if you can find it, was written about 2 years ago
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