When Configuring Forwarders, what IP Address do I use for ..

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

To all:

I recently configured the DNS Server only to find out that I entered the
incorrect IP's for DNS resolution. I entered the ISP IP's for DNS, and I
realize now that was a mistake because of the error messages found in my
system logs. (Event ID 5774, amd 5775). It is my understanding that ISP's
prefer that you don't use their DNS IP's?

In any event, I recently printed out instructions from Microsoft on how to
Configure Forwarders but I have run into a wall. The instructions tell me to
enable forwarders, and then enter the IP Address of the first DNS Server,
what IP Address do I put in?
Is it the Server's personal IP Address, or is it the Static IP Address given
to me from my ISP?

FYI:
I am using a Static IP Address through my DI-624 D-Link router, but have
disabled DHCP. I am using Windows 2000 Server's DHCP to distribute the pool
of IP's out to my clients.

One last question. Once I have configured the forwarders properly, will the
folders msdcs, udp, and tcp show up in my DNS properties?

Thanks for your time, and please get back to me as soon as possible.

Sweeper.
6 answers Last reply
More about when configuring forwarders address
  1. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    In the properties of TCP/IP on your server, point the DNS server to itself
    for DNS. In the forwarders tab point your DNS server to your ISP's DNS
    server.


    > One last question. Once I have configured the forwarders properly, will
    > the
    > folders msdcs, udp, and tcp show up in my DNS properties?
    >


    No this is not what sets up those records. Pointing your DNS server to
    itself in the properties of TCP/IP is what sets up these folders during the
    logon process. You will have to reboot to get them created.

    AD clients MUST find the SRV records in order to "find" the domain. You
    don't want (and most ISP will not allow you to) your AD domain records
    registered on your ISP's public DNS server. Pointing your DNS server to
    itself for DNS will create the required SRV records AD clients MUST find
    (Your AD DNS server IS an AD client). You MUST point all AD clients to your
    AD DNS server ONLY. Anything they can't find (the *entire* Internet) in that
    AD zone is passed to the forwarders.

    hth
    DDS W 2k MVP MCSE

    "Sweeper" <Sweeper@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:5A86BEEF-04AF-40D0-8F58-7AC45DF18689@microsoft.com...
    > To all:
    >
    > I recently configured the DNS Server only to find out that I entered the
    > incorrect IP's for DNS resolution. I entered the ISP IP's for DNS, and I
    > realize now that was a mistake because of the error messages found in my
    > system logs. (Event ID 5774, amd 5775). It is my understanding that ISP's
    > prefer that you don't use their DNS IP's?
    >
    > In any event, I recently printed out instructions from Microsoft on how to
    > Configure Forwarders but I have run into a wall. The instructions tell me
    > to
    > enable forwarders, and then enter the IP Address of the first DNS Server,
    > what IP Address do I put in?
    > Is it the Server's personal IP Address, or is it the Static IP Address
    > given
    > to me from my ISP?
    >
    > FYI:
    > I am using a Static IP Address through my DI-624 D-Link router, but have
    > disabled DHCP. I am using Windows 2000 Server's DHCP to distribute the
    > pool
    > of IP's out to my clients.
    >
    > One last question. Once I have configured the forwarders properly, will
    > the
    > folders msdcs, udp, and tcp show up in my DNS properties?
    >
    > Thanks for your time, and please get back to me as soon as possible.
    >
    > Sweeper.
    >
    >
  2. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Thank you very much Danny for clarifying this for me.

    I have another question regarding settting up DHCP.

    In Option (006) of the Scope Options, what IP Address do I put in for DNS
    Servers?
    Is it the ISP's or ..

    Thanks again,

    Sweeper.




    "Danny Sanders" wrote:

    > In the properties of TCP/IP on your server, point the DNS server to itself
    > for DNS. In the forwarders tab point your DNS server to your ISP's DNS
    > server.
    >
    >
    > > One last question. Once I have configured the forwarders properly, will
    > > the
    > > folders msdcs, udp, and tcp show up in my DNS properties?
    > >
    >
    >
    > No this is not what sets up those records. Pointing your DNS server to
    > itself in the properties of TCP/IP is what sets up these folders during the
    > logon process. You will have to reboot to get them created.
    >
    > AD clients MUST find the SRV records in order to "find" the domain. You
    > don't want (and most ISP will not allow you to) your AD domain records
    > registered on your ISP's public DNS server. Pointing your DNS server to
    > itself for DNS will create the required SRV records AD clients MUST find
    > (Your AD DNS server IS an AD client). You MUST point all AD clients to your
    > AD DNS server ONLY. Anything they can't find (the *entire* Internet) in that
    > AD zone is passed to the forwarders.
    >
    > hth
    > DDS W 2k MVP MCSE
    >
    > "Sweeper" <Sweeper@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    > news:5A86BEEF-04AF-40D0-8F58-7AC45DF18689@microsoft.com...
    > > To all:
    > >
    > > I recently configured the DNS Server only to find out that I entered the
    > > incorrect IP's for DNS resolution. I entered the ISP IP's for DNS, and I
    > > realize now that was a mistake because of the error messages found in my
    > > system logs. (Event ID 5774, amd 5775). It is my understanding that ISP's
    > > prefer that you don't use their DNS IP's?
    > >
    > > In any event, I recently printed out instructions from Microsoft on how to
    > > Configure Forwarders but I have run into a wall. The instructions tell me
    > > to
    > > enable forwarders, and then enter the IP Address of the first DNS Server,
    > > what IP Address do I put in?
    > > Is it the Server's personal IP Address, or is it the Static IP Address
    > > given
    > > to me from my ISP?
    > >
    > > FYI:
    > > I am using a Static IP Address through my DI-624 D-Link router, but have
    > > disabled DHCP. I am using Windows 2000 Server's DHCP to distribute the
    > > pool
    > > of IP's out to my clients.
    > >
    > > One last question. Once I have configured the forwarders properly, will
    > > the
    > > folders msdcs, udp, and tcp show up in my DNS properties?
    > >
    > > Thanks for your time, and please get back to me as soon as possible.
    > >
    > > Sweeper.
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >
  3. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Sweeper wrote:
    > To all:
    >
    > I recently configured the DNS Server only to find out
    > that I entered the incorrect IP's for DNS resolution.
    > I entered the ISP IP's for DNS, and I realize now that
    > was a mistake because of the error messages found in my
    > system logs. (Event ID 5774, amd 5775). It is my
    > understanding that ISP's prefer that you don't use their
    > DNS IP's?
    >
    A four step guide to setting up DNS in an AD environment.

    1) All your clients should use the internal DNS *only* for
    name resolution.

    2) The internal DNS should support SRV records and dynamic
    updates.

    3) The internal DNS servers should have their NICs
    configured with their own addresses.

    4) The internal DNS *service* on the DNS servers should be
    configured to forward all requests to an Internet DNS
    server, such as your ISP's DNS server.

    The reason you should not use the ISP's DNS servers for your
    Active Directory DNS is because they will not support SRV
    records and dynamic updates. Nothing to do with ISP
    preferences. Besides, having your internal DNS information
    on an Internet facing DNS such as your ISP's cannot be secure.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    Barzoomian the Martian - http://barzoomian.blogspot.com
  4. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Hello Enkidu:

    [1] biggest problem right now is the missing folders in DNS. _msdcs, _sites,
    _tcp, and _udp or AD Directory DNS Records.

    I am a newbie "rookie" in this department, so bare with me. Is it possible
    to get step by step instructions on how to re-populate these records?

    [2] Also, let's say these were my server's tcp/ip settings:

    From the General Tab:

    * Use the following IP Address is chosen:
    IP Address: 192.168.0.100
    Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1

    *Use the following DNS server addresses is chosen:
    Prefered DNS Server: 192.168.0.1

    From the Advanced TCP/IP Settings:

    IP Settings Tab:
    within IP Address is: 192.168.0.100 and
    Subnet Mask is: 255.255.255.0

    within Default gateways: 192.168.0..1

    From the DNS Tab:
    within DNS Server address: 192.168.0.1
    Append primary and connection specific DNS suffixes is selected
    Append parent suffixes of the primary DNS Suffix is selected
    Register this connection's addresses in DNS is selected

    Does this look right to you, and am I in any way pointing the DNS Server
    back to itself?

    Please help me, and thank you for all your help.

    Sweeper.


    "Enkidu" wrote:

    > Sweeper wrote:
    > > To all:
    > >
    > > I recently configured the DNS Server only to find out
    > > that I entered the incorrect IP's for DNS resolution.
    > > I entered the ISP IP's for DNS, and I realize now that
    > > was a mistake because of the error messages found in my
    > > system logs. (Event ID 5774, amd 5775). It is my
    > > understanding that ISP's prefer that you don't use their
    > > DNS IP's?
    > >
    > A four step guide to setting up DNS in an AD environment.
    >
    > 1) All your clients should use the internal DNS *only* for
    > name resolution.
    >
    > 2) The internal DNS should support SRV records and dynamic
    > updates.
    >
    > 3) The internal DNS servers should have their NICs
    > configured with their own addresses.
    >
    > 4) The internal DNS *service* on the DNS servers should be
    > configured to forward all requests to an Internet DNS
    > server, such as your ISP's DNS server.
    >
    > The reason you should not use the ISP's DNS servers for your
    > Active Directory DNS is because they will not support SRV
    > records and dynamic updates. Nothing to do with ISP
    > preferences. Besides, having your internal DNS information
    > on an Internet facing DNS such as your ISP's cannot be secure.
    >
    > Cheers,
    >
    > Cliff
    >
    > --
    >
    > Barzoomian the Martian - http://barzoomian.blogspot.com
    >
  5. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    Sweeper wrote:
    > Thank you very much Danny for clarifying this for me.
    >
    > I have another question regarding settting up DHCP.
    >
    > In Option (006) of the Scope Options, what IP Address do I put in for DNS
    > Servers? Is it the ISP's or ..
    >
    You must configure DHCP to send out the information about
    *your internal DNS*. The internal client machines do not
    directly query the Internet DNS for sites out there on the
    Internet.

    They query the local DNS server, which then "forwards" the
    query to the Internet DNS. The Internet DNS replies to the
    internal server and the internal server informs the client.

    The clients, need not, and should not, know anything about
    the internet, DNS or otherwise. When a client wants a page
    from the internet, such as the Microsoft Home page, it will
    ask the internal DNS to find out the IP address, and then it
    sends the request for the page to the internal gateway to
    the Internet.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    Barzoomian the Martian - http://barzoomian.blogspot.com
  6. Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

    > [1] biggest problem right now is the missing folders in DNS. _msdcs,
    > _sites,
    > _tcp, and _udp or AD Directory DNS Records.

    These records are created automatically during logon on the DNS server *if*
    the DNS server is pointed to itself for DNS in the properties of TCP/IP.

    Example:

    IP address of your AD DNS server is 192.168.0.100, in the properties of
    TCP/IP on that *same* DNS server it should point to (use the following DNS
    servers) 192.168.0.100 for DNS.


    > * Use the following IP Address is chosen:
    > IP Address: 192.168.0.100
    > Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    > Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
    >
    > *Use the following DNS server addresses is chosen:
    > Prefered DNS Server: 192.168.0.1


    If in the above example 192.168.0.100 is your AD DNS server and you use
    192.168.0.1 as your preferred DNS server you are "pointing" your AD DNS
    server to the default gateway NOT itself. If the above example is your AD
    DNS server you would "point it to itself for DNS" by setting 192.168.0.100
    as the preferred DNS server. Reboot after pointing it to itself to get the
    proper records created.

    Manually give the AD DNS server it's IP address of 192.168.0.100, Subnet
    mask = 255.255.255.0, Default gateway = 192.168.0.1, preferred DNS server =
    192.168.0.100.

    Configure these settings only don't bother with the advanced settings. These
    four settings will get you up and running. When I say "point all AD clients
    to the AD DNS server only" it means (using the above example) Set up DHCP to
    give your clients the IP address iv 192.168.0.100 for their individual DNS
    settings or manually give each client the IP address of 192.168.0.100 for
    their "preferred DNS server".


    hth
    DDS W 2k MVP MCSE
    ..
    "Sweeper" <Sweeper@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
    news:AB81F1A8-3E4A-4BDA-A09D-34AA37541954@microsoft.com...
    > Hello Enkidu:
    >
    > [1] biggest problem right now is the missing folders in DNS. _msdcs,
    > _sites,
    > _tcp, and _udp or AD Directory DNS Records.
    >
    > I am a newbie "rookie" in this department, so bare with me. Is it possible
    > to get step by step instructions on how to re-populate these records?
    >
    > [2] Also, let's say these were my server's tcp/ip settings:
    >
    > From the General Tab:
    >
    > * Use the following IP Address is chosen:
    > IP Address: 192.168.0.100
    > Subnet Mask: 255.255.255.0
    > Default Gateway: 192.168.0.1
    >
    > *Use the following DNS server addresses is chosen:
    > Prefered DNS Server: 192.168.0.1
    >
    > From the Advanced TCP/IP Settings:
    >
    > IP Settings Tab:
    > within IP Address is: 192.168.0.100 and
    > Subnet Mask is: 255.255.255.0
    >
    > within Default gateways: 192.168.0..1
    >
    > From the DNS Tab:
    > within DNS Server address: 192.168.0.1
    > Append primary and connection specific DNS suffixes is selected
    > Append parent suffixes of the primary DNS Suffix is selected
    > Register this connection's addresses in DNS is selected
    >
    > Does this look right to you, and am I in any way pointing the DNS Server
    > back to itself?
    >
    > Please help me, and thank you for all your help.
    >
    > Sweeper.
    >
    >
    > "Enkidu" wrote:
    >
    >> Sweeper wrote:
    >> > To all:
    >> >
    >> > I recently configured the DNS Server only to find out
    >> > that I entered the incorrect IP's for DNS resolution.
    >> > I entered the ISP IP's for DNS, and I realize now that
    >> > was a mistake because of the error messages found in my
    >> > system logs. (Event ID 5774, amd 5775). It is my
    >> > understanding that ISP's prefer that you don't use their
    >> > DNS IP's?
    >> >
    >> A four step guide to setting up DNS in an AD environment.
    >>
    >> 1) All your clients should use the internal DNS *only* for
    >> name resolution.
    >>
    >> 2) The internal DNS should support SRV records and dynamic
    >> updates.
    >>
    >> 3) The internal DNS servers should have their NICs
    >> configured with their own addresses.
    >>
    >> 4) The internal DNS *service* on the DNS servers should be
    >> configured to forward all requests to an Internet DNS
    >> server, such as your ISP's DNS server.
    >>
    >> The reason you should not use the ISP's DNS servers for your
    >> Active Directory DNS is because they will not support SRV
    >> records and dynamic updates. Nothing to do with ISP
    >> preferences. Besides, having your internal DNS information
    >> on an Internet facing DNS such as your ISP's cannot be secure.
    >>
    >> Cheers,
    >>
    >> Cliff
    >>
    >> --
    >>
    >> Barzoomian the Martian - http://barzoomian.blogspot.com
    >>
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