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Installing a second operating system on a second drive

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Anonymous
May 31, 2005 9:37:22 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an operating
system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive. All the
drives are formatted.
Thank You, Mike R.
Anonymous
June 1, 2005 3:24:02 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

"Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an operating
> system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive. All
the
> drives are formatted.
> Thank You, Mike R.

Simple:

- Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
- Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.

Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
e.g. XOSL (free!).
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 3:51:28 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want the install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want it to be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003 is enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who cares?) at the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install the op sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other drive the Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then that partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup. Trouble is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on the Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set of startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where your small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a little tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see your Op sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is sufficient to choose the particular op sys you want to boot.

Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know if that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then you make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and delete the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software used to do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary IDE harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an operating
> > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive. All
> the
> > drives are formatted.
> > Thank You, Mike R.
>
> Simple:
>
> - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
>
> Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> e.g. XOSL (free!).
>
>
Related resources
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 5:31:01 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

The way I'd do it is:

a) install the 1st OS on the 1st drive
b) confirm the location of the boot.ini and ntloader file
c) load the 2nd OS on the 2nd drive
d) modify the above boot.ini file so that there is an entry and disk pointer
to the 2nd OS.

"Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an operating
> system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive. All
the
> drives are formatted.
> Thank You, Mike R.
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 7:06:28 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
What you have not really explained is how you're going to
switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
them?

All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.


"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want the
install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want it to
be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003 is
enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who cares?) at
the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install the op
sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other drive the
Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then that
partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup. Trouble
is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on the
Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set of
startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where your
small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a little
tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see your Op
sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is sufficient to
choose the particular op sys you want to boot.

Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know if
that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then you
make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and delete
the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software used to
do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary IDE
harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
>
> "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
message
> news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
operating
> > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive.
All
> the
> > drives are formatted.
> > Thank You, Mike R.
>
> Simple:
>
> - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
>
> Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> e.g. XOSL (free!).
>
>
Anonymous
June 2, 2005 7:06:29 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install Windows 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be it. Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.

You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot loader comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.

You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or relevant. The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000 on before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.

The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not arguing with that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not necessary. Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install by default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go after the new install.

The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files will occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of its bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> them?
>
> All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
>
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want the
> install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want it to
> be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003 is
> enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who cares?) at
> the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install the op
> sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other drive the
> Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then that
> partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup. Trouble
> is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on the
> Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set of
> startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where your
> small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a little
> tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see your Op
> sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is sufficient to
> choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
>
> Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know if
> that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
> trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then you
> make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and delete
> the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software used to
> do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary IDE
> harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >
> > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> message
> > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> operating
> > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive.
> All
> > the
> > > drives are formatted.
> > > Thank You, Mike R.
> >
> > Simple:
> >
> > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> >
> > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 5:25:26 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Right that is the way to do it. All I was explaining is how to make the second install be on C. If the user doesn't care yours is the way to do it. And the native Windows 2000 boot loader will be used when the default is set to wait some time (I use 15 sec). Heck you can even test this yourself right now.

This will do it:

[boot loader]
timeout=15
default=multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINNT
[operating systems]
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(1)\WINNT="Microsoft Windows 2000 Advanced Server" /fastdetect
multi(0)disk(0)rdisk(1)partition(2)\WINNT="(fake)" /fastdetect

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"j9" <j9@1stamericanproperties.com> wrote in message news:eI2Ydm6ZFHA.3356@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> The way I'd do it is:
>
> a) install the 1st OS on the 1st drive
> b) confirm the location of the boot.ini and ntloader file
> c) load the 2nd OS on the 2nd drive
> d) modify the above boot.ini file so that there is an entry and disk pointer
> to the 2nd OS.
>
> "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message
> news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an operating
> > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive. All
> the
> > drives are formatted.
> > Thank You, Mike R.
>
>
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 12:27:54 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
drive C: when active.

If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
drive letters then there is no need to continue.

=======================

"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install Windows
2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be it.
Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.

You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot loader
comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.

You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or relevant.
The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000 on
before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.

The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not arguing with
that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not necessary.
Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install by
default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go after
the new install.

The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files will
occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of its
bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> them?
>
> All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
>
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want the
> install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want it
to
> be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003 is
> enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who cares?)
at
> the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install the op
> sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other drive
the
> Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then that
> partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
Trouble
> is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on the
> Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set of
> startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where your
> small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a little
> tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see your Op
> sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is sufficient to
> choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
>
> Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know if
> that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
> trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then you
> make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and
delete
> the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software used to
> do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary IDE
> harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> >
> > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> message
> > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> operating
> > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive.
> All
> > the
> > > drives are formatted.
> > > Thank You, Mike R.
> >
> > Simple:
> >
> > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> >
> > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 12:27:55 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

It doesn't and I never said it did. He has a Windows 2000 installation on his Primary IDE Harddrive as Master. But he wants to install Windows 2000 on a harddrive that is NOT on the Primary IDE channel as Master. What I explained is how to do that and give that new installation the drive letter C. And furthermore where it is NOT necessary to use a 3rd party boot loader. Remember a 3rd party boot loader alone will NOT provide the second installation the oppurtunity to be on C.

This is the configuration prior to installing the second OP sys.

Master harddrive on Primary IDE Channel has two partitions:
Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (NOT Active) (bootable)
Part 2 (Windows 2000 original install) (NOT Active) (bootable)

Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary IDE connection.
Part 1 (blank) (Active) (bootable)

Getting this configuration is the crux of the matter. Now you are ready to install Windows 2000 (2nd op sys).

When you do that guess which partition will show as C in Windows 2000 Setup? Right the Part 1 on "Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary IDE connection" because it is Active.

Windows 2000 will balk at installing there. It tells you it needs a partition on the Master harddrive on the Primary IDE Channel to write a small set of Startup files to. You have that: Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (bootable).

All done. Proceed with the Installation. Now both Windows 2000 see themselves on C; the native boot loader can be used to choose which op sys to boot; the second install takes care of everything for you by default. The only thing left is to set boot.ini to wait some time (ie. 15 secs) before doing the default. You will see boot.ini on that small partition.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message news:uE80UJ8ZFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
> of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
> drive C: when active.
>
> If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
> the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
> if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
> drive letters then there is no need to continue.
>
> =======================
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
> install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install Windows
> 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be it.
> Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.
>
> You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot loader
> comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
> Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.
>
> You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or relevant.
> The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000 on
> before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.
>
> The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not arguing with
> that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not necessary.
> Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install by
> default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go after
> the new install.
>
> The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files will
> occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of its
> bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> > What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> > switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> > drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> > boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> > them?
> >
> > All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> > boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> > has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> > then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> > principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
> >
> >
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want the
> > install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want it
> to
> > be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> > Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003 is
> > enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who cares?)
> at
> > the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install the op
> > sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other drive
> the
> > Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then that
> > partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
> Trouble
> > is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on the
> > Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set of
> > startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where your
> > small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a little
> > tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see your Op
> > sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is sufficient to
> > choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
> >
> > Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know if
> > that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
> > trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then you
> > make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and
> delete
> > the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software used to
> > do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary IDE
> > harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _______________________________
> > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > >
> > > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> > message
> > > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> > operating
> > > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second harddrive.
> > All
> > > the
> > > > drives are formatted.
> > > > Thank You, Mike R.
> > >
> > > Simple:
> > >
> > > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> > >
> > > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 8:09:42 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

The point I tried to make to the OP was that he needs a
third-party boot loader such as XOSL to make his
OSs truly independent from each other. This involves
running each OS off its own drive C:. Contrary to
what you think, XOSL can do this. I have several
installations to prove it.

Furthermore, XOSL does not interfere with the boot
sector of any OS. This means that you can easily boot
into any OS without the help of XOSL - provided that
you have some other tool to hide/unhide partitions and
to mark them active/inactive. XOSL will do this for with
a nice little menu.
======================
"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:eviUiw$ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
It doesn't and I never said it did. He has a Windows 2000 installation on
his Primary IDE Harddrive as Master. But he wants to install Windows 2000 on
a harddrive that is NOT on the Primary IDE channel as Master. What I
explained is how to do that and give that new installation the drive letter
C. And furthermore where it is NOT necessary to use a 3rd party boot
loader. Remember a 3rd party boot loader alone will NOT provide the second
installation the oppurtunity to be on C.

This is the configuration prior to installing the second OP sys.

Master harddrive on Primary IDE Channel has two partitions:
Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (NOT Active) (bootable)
Part 2 (Windows 2000 original install) (NOT Active) (bootable)

Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary IDE
connection.
Part 1 (blank) (Active) (bootable)

Getting this configuration is the crux of the matter. Now you are ready to
install Windows 2000 (2nd op sys).

When you do that guess which partition will show as C in Windows 2000 Setup?
Right the Part 1 on "Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive
using Secondary IDE connection" because it is Active.

Windows 2000 will balk at installing there. It tells you it needs a
partition on the Master harddrive on the Primary IDE Channel to write a
small set of Startup files to. You have that: Part 1 (7MB) (blank)
(bootable).

All done. Proceed with the Installation. Now both Windows 2000 see
themselves on C; the native boot loader can be used to choose which op sys
to boot; the second install takes care of everything for you by default.
The only thing left is to set boot.ini to wait some time (ie. 15 secs)
before doing the default. You will see boot.ini on that small partition.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
news:uE80UJ8ZFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
> of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
> drive C: when active.
>
> If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
> the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
> if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
> drive letters then there is no need to continue.
>
> =======================
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
> install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install Windows
> 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be it.
> Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.
>
> You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot loader
> comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
> Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.
>
> You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or
relevant.
> The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000 on
> before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.
>
> The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not arguing
with
> that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not necessary.
> Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install by
> default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go
after
> the new install.
>
> The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files will
> occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of its
> bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> > What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> > switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> > drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> > boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> > them?
> >
> > All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> > boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> > has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> > then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> > principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
> >
> >
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want
the
> > install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want
it
> to
> > be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> > Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003 is
> > enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who
cares?)
> at
> > the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install the
op
> > sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other drive
> the
> > Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then that
> > partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
> Trouble
> > is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on the
> > Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set of
> > startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where your
> > small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a
little
> > tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see your
Op
> > sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is sufficient
to
> > choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
> >
> > Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know if
> > that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
> > trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then you
> > make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and
> delete
> > the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software used
to
> > do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary IDE
> > harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _______________________________
> > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > >
> > > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> > message
> > > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> > operating
> > > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second
harddrive.
> > All
> > > the
> > > > drives are formatted.
> > > > Thank You, Mike R.
> > >
> > > Simple:
> > >
> > > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> > >
> > > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 3, 2005 8:09:43 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Well I don't know anything about XOSL. Provide a link please? Either will work I suppose. I just assummed if it was a boot loader then that is what it was. I didn't know it would also allow the second install of Windows 2000 to go on C. My understanding is that is not what a boot loader does so I need to look at it.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message news:elTNYLAaFHA.2308@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> The point I tried to make to the OP was that he needs a
> third-party boot loader such as XOSL to make his
> OSs truly independent from each other. This involves
> running each OS off its own drive C:. Contrary to
> what you think, XOSL can do this. I have several
> installations to prove it.
>
> Furthermore, XOSL does not interfere with the boot
> sector of any OS. This means that you can easily boot
> into any OS without the help of XOSL - provided that
> you have some other tool to hide/unhide partitions and
> to mark them active/inactive. XOSL will do this for with
> a nice little menu.
> ======================
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:eviUiw$ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> It doesn't and I never said it did. He has a Windows 2000 installation on
> his Primary IDE Harddrive as Master. But he wants to install Windows 2000 on
> a harddrive that is NOT on the Primary IDE channel as Master. What I
> explained is how to do that and give that new installation the drive letter
> C. And furthermore where it is NOT necessary to use a 3rd party boot
> loader. Remember a 3rd party boot loader alone will NOT provide the second
> installation the oppurtunity to be on C.
>
> This is the configuration prior to installing the second OP sys.
>
> Master harddrive on Primary IDE Channel has two partitions:
> Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> Part 2 (Windows 2000 original install) (NOT Active) (bootable)
>
> Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary IDE
> connection.
> Part 1 (blank) (Active) (bootable)
>
> Getting this configuration is the crux of the matter. Now you are ready to
> install Windows 2000 (2nd op sys).
>
> When you do that guess which partition will show as C in Windows 2000 Setup?
> Right the Part 1 on "Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive
> using Secondary IDE connection" because it is Active.
>
> Windows 2000 will balk at installing there. It tells you it needs a
> partition on the Master harddrive on the Primary IDE Channel to write a
> small set of Startup files to. You have that: Part 1 (7MB) (blank)
> (bootable).
>
> All done. Proceed with the Installation. Now both Windows 2000 see
> themselves on C; the native boot loader can be used to choose which op sys
> to boot; the second install takes care of everything for you by default.
> The only thing left is to set boot.ini to wait some time (ie. 15 secs)
> before doing the default. You will see boot.ini on that small partition.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:uE80UJ8ZFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
> > of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
> > drive C: when active.
> >
> > If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
> > the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
> > if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
> > drive letters then there is no need to continue.
> >
> > =======================
> >
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
> > install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install Windows
> > 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be it.
> > Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.
> >
> > You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot loader
> > comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
> > Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.
> >
> > You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or
> relevant.
> > The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000 on
> > before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.
> >
> > The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not arguing
> with
> > that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not necessary.
> > Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install by
> > default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go
> after
> > the new install.
> >
> > The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files will
> > occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of its
> > bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _______________________________
> > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> > > What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> > > switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> > > drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> > > boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> > > them?
> > >
> > > All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> > > boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> > > has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> > > then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> > > principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
> > >
> > >
> > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want
> the
> > > install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want
> it
> > to
> > > be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> > > Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003 is
> > > enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who
> cares?)
> > at
> > > the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install the
> op
> > > sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other drive
> > the
> > > Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then that
> > > partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
> > Trouble
> > > is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on the
> > > Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set of
> > > startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where your
> > > small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a
> little
> > > tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see your
> Op
> > > sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is sufficient
> to
> > > choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
> > >
> > > Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know if
> > > that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
> > > trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then you
> > > make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and
> > delete
> > > the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software used
> to
> > > do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary IDE
> > > harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
> > >
> > > --
> > > George Hester
> > > _______________________________
> > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > >
> > > > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> > > message
> > > > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> > > operating
> > > > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second
> harddrive.
> > > All
> > > > the
> > > > > drives are formatted.
> > > > > Thank You, Mike R.
> > > >
> > > > Simple:
> > > >
> > > > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > > > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> > > >
> > > > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > > > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > > > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > > > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > > > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > > > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 3:59:15 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Try googling for these keywords:

xosl download

The Windows boot loader is a very basic boot loader - it simply
invokes the boot files of the chosen OS, all of which are usually
visible.

Other boot loaders can do much more, e.g. switch partitions on
and off (i.e. hide them) as specified by the user. They can also
provide password protection for an OS, which is great in a
family environment where the kids keep wrecking their OS
while mom's OS (used for university studies) remains intact
and undisturbed.

Lastly, some boot loaders allow you to do what most people
say is impossible: To load an OS on a logical drive on a slave
disk, complete with all boot files, and boot from it. This ability
overcomes the restriction of having no more than four OSs in a PC.


"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:u6kvwmFaFHA.2212@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
Well I don't know anything about XOSL. Provide a link please? Either will
work I suppose. I just assummed if it was a boot loader then that is what
it was. I didn't know it would also allow the second install of Windows
2000 to go on C. My understanding is that is not what a boot loader does so
I need to look at it.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
news:elTNYLAaFHA.2308@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> The point I tried to make to the OP was that he needs a
> third-party boot loader such as XOSL to make his
> OSs truly independent from each other. This involves
> running each OS off its own drive C:. Contrary to
> what you think, XOSL can do this. I have several
> installations to prove it.
>
> Furthermore, XOSL does not interfere with the boot
> sector of any OS. This means that you can easily boot
> into any OS without the help of XOSL - provided that
> you have some other tool to hide/unhide partitions and
> to mark them active/inactive. XOSL will do this for with
> a nice little menu.
> ======================
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:eviUiw$ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> It doesn't and I never said it did. He has a Windows 2000 installation on
> his Primary IDE Harddrive as Master. But he wants to install Windows 2000
on
> a harddrive that is NOT on the Primary IDE channel as Master. What I
> explained is how to do that and give that new installation the drive
letter
> C. And furthermore where it is NOT necessary to use a 3rd party boot
> loader. Remember a 3rd party boot loader alone will NOT provide the
second
> installation the oppurtunity to be on C.
>
> This is the configuration prior to installing the second OP sys.
>
> Master harddrive on Primary IDE Channel has two partitions:
> Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> Part 2 (Windows 2000 original install) (NOT Active) (bootable)
>
> Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary IDE
> connection.
> Part 1 (blank) (Active) (bootable)
>
> Getting this configuration is the crux of the matter. Now you are ready
to
> install Windows 2000 (2nd op sys).
>
> When you do that guess which partition will show as C in Windows 2000
Setup?
> Right the Part 1 on "Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR
harddrive
> using Secondary IDE connection" because it is Active.
>
> Windows 2000 will balk at installing there. It tells you it needs a
> partition on the Master harddrive on the Primary IDE Channel to write a
> small set of Startup files to. You have that: Part 1 (7MB) (blank)
> (bootable).
>
> All done. Proceed with the Installation. Now both Windows 2000 see
> themselves on C; the native boot loader can be used to choose which op sys
> to boot; the second install takes care of everything for you by default.
> The only thing left is to set boot.ini to wait some time (ie. 15 secs)
> before doing the default. You will see boot.ini on that small partition.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:uE80UJ8ZFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
> > of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
> > drive C: when active.
> >
> > If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
> > the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
> > if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
> > drive letters then there is no need to continue.
> >
> > =======================
> >
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
> > install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install Windows
> > 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be
it.
> > Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.
> >
> > You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot loader
> > comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
> > Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.
> >
> > You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or
> relevant.
> > The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000
on
> > before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.
> >
> > The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not arguing
> with
> > that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not necessary.
> > Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install
by
> > default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go
> after
> > the new install.
> >
> > The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files
will
> > occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of
its
> > bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _______________________________
> > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> > > What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> > > switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> > > drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> > > boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> > > them?
> > >
> > > All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> > > boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> > > has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> > > then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> > > principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
> > >
> > >
> > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want
> the
> > > install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want
> it
> > to
> > > be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> > > Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003
is
> > > enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who
> cares?)
> > at
> > > the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install
the
> op
> > > sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other
drive
> > the
> > > Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then
that
> > > partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
> > Trouble
> > > is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on
the
> > > Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set
of
> > > startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where
your
> > > small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a
> little
> > > tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see
your
> Op
> > > sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is
sufficient
> to
> > > choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
> > >
> > > Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know
if
> > > that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
> > > trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then
you
> > > make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and
> > delete
> > > the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software
used
> to
> > > do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary
IDE
> > > harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
> > >
> > > --
> > > George Hester
> > > _______________________________
> > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > >
> > > > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> > > message
> > > > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> > > operating
> > > > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second
> harddrive.
> > > All
> > > > the
> > > > > drives are formatted.
> > > > > Thank You, Mike R.
> > > >
> > > > Simple:
> > > >
> > > > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > > > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> > > >
> > > > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > > > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > > > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > > > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > > > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > > > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 4, 2005 4:50:03 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

The Windows boot loader in Windows 2000 will do the same thing ie. allow Operating systems to reside on any partition on any IDE drive. Yes the password protection is not supported in the Windows boot loader. I grant you that. All I know is that if you want Every OS installation to see itself on C a boot loader alone is not sufficient. And I don't think that is even possible if you want more than one install of an OS on the Master IDE drive of the Primary IDE channel. Put another way I have not yet figured out how to do it. I could do it with a 3rd party boot loader but not using the Windows boot loader.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message news:#aY5FkKaFHA.3384@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Try googling for these keywords:
>
> xosl download
>
> The Windows boot loader is a very basic boot loader - it simply
> invokes the boot files of the chosen OS, all of which are usually
> visible.
>
> Other boot loaders can do much more, e.g. switch partitions on
> and off (i.e. hide them) as specified by the user. They can also
> provide password protection for an OS, which is great in a
> family environment where the kids keep wrecking their OS
> while mom's OS (used for university studies) remains intact
> and undisturbed.
>
> Lastly, some boot loaders allow you to do what most people
> say is impossible: To load an OS on a logical drive on a slave
> disk, complete with all boot files, and boot from it. This ability
> overcomes the restriction of having no more than four OSs in a PC.
>
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:u6kvwmFaFHA.2212@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Well I don't know anything about XOSL. Provide a link please? Either will
> work I suppose. I just assummed if it was a boot loader then that is what
> it was. I didn't know it would also allow the second install of Windows
> 2000 to go on C. My understanding is that is not what a boot loader does so
> I need to look at it.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:elTNYLAaFHA.2308@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > The point I tried to make to the OP was that he needs a
> > third-party boot loader such as XOSL to make his
> > OSs truly independent from each other. This involves
> > running each OS off its own drive C:. Contrary to
> > what you think, XOSL can do this. I have several
> > installations to prove it.
> >
> > Furthermore, XOSL does not interfere with the boot
> > sector of any OS. This means that you can easily boot
> > into any OS without the help of XOSL - provided that
> > you have some other tool to hide/unhide partitions and
> > to mark them active/inactive. XOSL will do this for with
> > a nice little menu.
> > ======================
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:eviUiw$ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > It doesn't and I never said it did. He has a Windows 2000 installation on
> > his Primary IDE Harddrive as Master. But he wants to install Windows 2000
> on
> > a harddrive that is NOT on the Primary IDE channel as Master. What I
> > explained is how to do that and give that new installation the drive
> letter
> > C. And furthermore where it is NOT necessary to use a 3rd party boot
> > loader. Remember a 3rd party boot loader alone will NOT provide the
> second
> > installation the oppurtunity to be on C.
> >
> > This is the configuration prior to installing the second OP sys.
> >
> > Master harddrive on Primary IDE Channel has two partitions:
> > Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> > Part 2 (Windows 2000 original install) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> >
> > Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary IDE
> > connection.
> > Part 1 (blank) (Active) (bootable)
> >
> > Getting this configuration is the crux of the matter. Now you are ready
> to
> > install Windows 2000 (2nd op sys).
> >
> > When you do that guess which partition will show as C in Windows 2000
> Setup?
> > Right the Part 1 on "Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR
> harddrive
> > using Secondary IDE connection" because it is Active.
> >
> > Windows 2000 will balk at installing there. It tells you it needs a
> > partition on the Master harddrive on the Primary IDE Channel to write a
> > small set of Startup files to. You have that: Part 1 (7MB) (blank)
> > (bootable).
> >
> > All done. Proceed with the Installation. Now both Windows 2000 see
> > themselves on C; the native boot loader can be used to choose which op sys
> > to boot; the second install takes care of everything for you by default.
> > The only thing left is to set boot.ini to wait some time (ie. 15 secs)
> > before doing the default. You will see boot.ini on that small partition.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _______________________________
> > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > news:uE80UJ8ZFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > > I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
> > > of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
> > > drive C: when active.
> > >
> > > If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
> > > the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
> > > if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
> > > drive letters then there is no need to continue.
> > >
> > > =======================
> > >
> > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
> > > install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install Windows
> > > 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be
> it.
> > > Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.
> > >
> > > You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot loader
> > > comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
> > > Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.
> > >
> > > You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or
> > relevant.
> > > The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000
> on
> > > before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.
> > >
> > > The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not arguing
> > with
> > > that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not necessary.
> > > Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install
> by
> > > default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go
> > after
> > > the new install.
> > >
> > > The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files
> will
> > > occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of
> its
> > > bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!
> > >
> > > --
> > > George Hester
> > > _______________________________
> > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > > What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> > > > What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> > > > switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> > > > drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> > > > boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> > > > them?
> > > >
> > > > All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> > > > boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> > > > has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> > > > then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> > > > principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > > Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you want
> > the
> > > > install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you want
> > it
> > > to
> > > > be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> > > > Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows 2003
> is
> > > > enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who
> > cares?)
> > > at
> > > > the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install
> the
> > op
> > > > sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other
> drive
> > > the
> > > > Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then
> that
> > > > partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
> > > Trouble
> > > > is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on
> the
> > > > Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set
> of
> > > > startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where
> your
> > > > small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a
> > little
> > > > tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see
> your
> > Op
> > > > sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is
> sufficient
> > to
> > > > choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
> > > >
> > > > Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me know
> if
> > > > that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires a
> > > > trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then
> you
> > > > make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back and
> > > delete
> > > > the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software
> used
> > to
> > > > do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary
> IDE
> > > > harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
> > > >
> > > > --
> > > > George Hester
> > > > _______________________________
> > > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > > >
> > > > > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in
> > > > message
> > > > > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > > > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> > > > operating
> > > > > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second
> > harddrive.
> > > > All
> > > > > the
> > > > > > drives are formatted.
> > > > > > Thank You, Mike R.
> > > > >
> > > > > Simple:
> > > > >
> > > > > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > > > > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> > > > >
> > > > > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > > > > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > > > > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > > > > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > > > > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > > > > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 5, 2005 12:54:08 PM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

You write "The Windows boot loader in Windows 2000 will
do the same thing ie. allow Operating systems to reside on any
partition on any IDE drive." I'm afraid this is incorrect. The
Windows boot files (ntldr, ntdetect.com, boot.ini) must reside
on the active partition of the primary master. They cannot reside
on a slave drive, on a secondary disk or on a logical partition.

"George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
news:o YcnuVSaFHA.3488@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
The Windows boot loader in Windows 2000 will do the same thing ie. allow
Operating systems to reside on any partition on any IDE drive. Yes the
password protection is not supported in the Windows boot loader. I grant
you that. All I know is that if you want Every OS installation to see
itself on C a boot loader alone is not sufficient. And I don't think that
is even possible if you want more than one install of an OS on the Master
IDE drive of the Primary IDE channel. Put another way I have not yet
figured out how to do it. I could do it with a 3rd party boot loader but
not using the Windows boot loader.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
news:#aY5FkKaFHA.3384@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> Try googling for these keywords:
>
> xosl download
>
> The Windows boot loader is a very basic boot loader - it simply
> invokes the boot files of the chosen OS, all of which are usually
> visible.
>
> Other boot loaders can do much more, e.g. switch partitions on
> and off (i.e. hide them) as specified by the user. They can also
> provide password protection for an OS, which is great in a
> family environment where the kids keep wrecking their OS
> while mom's OS (used for university studies) remains intact
> and undisturbed.
>
> Lastly, some boot loaders allow you to do what most people
> say is impossible: To load an OS on a logical drive on a slave
> disk, complete with all boot files, and boot from it. This ability
> overcomes the restriction of having no more than four OSs in a PC.
>
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:u6kvwmFaFHA.2212@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> Well I don't know anything about XOSL. Provide a link please? Either
will
> work I suppose. I just assummed if it was a boot loader then that is what
> it was. I didn't know it would also allow the second install of Windows
> 2000 to go on C. My understanding is that is not what a boot loader does
so
> I need to look at it.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:elTNYLAaFHA.2308@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > The point I tried to make to the OP was that he needs a
> > third-party boot loader such as XOSL to make his
> > OSs truly independent from each other. This involves
> > running each OS off its own drive C:. Contrary to
> > what you think, XOSL can do this. I have several
> > installations to prove it.
> >
> > Furthermore, XOSL does not interfere with the boot
> > sector of any OS. This means that you can easily boot
> > into any OS without the help of XOSL - provided that
> > you have some other tool to hide/unhide partitions and
> > to mark them active/inactive. XOSL will do this for with
> > a nice little menu.
> > ======================
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:eviUiw$ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > It doesn't and I never said it did. He has a Windows 2000 installation
on
> > his Primary IDE Harddrive as Master. But he wants to install Windows
2000
> on
> > a harddrive that is NOT on the Primary IDE channel as Master. What I
> > explained is how to do that and give that new installation the drive
> letter
> > C. And furthermore where it is NOT necessary to use a 3rd party boot
> > loader. Remember a 3rd party boot loader alone will NOT provide the
> second
> > installation the oppurtunity to be on C.
> >
> > This is the configuration prior to installing the second OP sys.
> >
> > Master harddrive on Primary IDE Channel has two partitions:
> > Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> > Part 2 (Windows 2000 original install) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> >
> > Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary
IDE
> > connection.
> > Part 1 (blank) (Active) (bootable)
> >
> > Getting this configuration is the crux of the matter. Now you are ready
> to
> > install Windows 2000 (2nd op sys).
> >
> > When you do that guess which partition will show as C in Windows 2000
> Setup?
> > Right the Part 1 on "Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR
> harddrive
> > using Secondary IDE connection" because it is Active.
> >
> > Windows 2000 will balk at installing there. It tells you it needs a
> > partition on the Master harddrive on the Primary IDE Channel to write a
> > small set of Startup files to. You have that: Part 1 (7MB) (blank)
> > (bootable).
> >
> > All done. Proceed with the Installation. Now both Windows 2000 see
> > themselves on C; the native boot loader can be used to choose which op
sys
> > to boot; the second install takes care of everything for you by default.
> > The only thing left is to set boot.ini to wait some time (ie. 15 secs)
> > before doing the default. You will see boot.ini on that small
partition.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _______________________________
> > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > news:uE80UJ8ZFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > > I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
> > > of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
> > > drive C: when active.
> > >
> > > If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
> > > the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
> > > if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
> > > drive letters then there is no need to continue.
> > >
> > > =======================
> > >
> > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
> > > install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install
Windows
> > > 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be
> it.
> > > Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.
> > >
> > > You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot
loader
> > > comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
> > > Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.
> > >
> > > You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or
> > relevant.
> > > The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000
> on
> > > before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.
> > >
> > > The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not
arguing
> > with
> > > that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not
necessary.
> > > Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install
> by
> > > default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go
> > after
> > > the new install.
> > >
> > > The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files
> will
> > > occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of
> its
> > > bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!
> > >
> > > --
> > > George Hester
> > > _______________________________
> > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > > What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> > > > What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> > > > switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> > > > drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> > > > boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> > > > them?
> > > >
> > > > All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> > > > boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> > > > has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> > > > then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> > > > principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
> > > >
> > > >
> > > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > > Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you
want
> > the
> > > > install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you
want
> > it
> > > to
> > > > be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> > > > Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows
2003
> is
> > > > enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who
> > cares?)
> > > at
> > > > the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install
> the
> > op
> > > > sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other
> drive
> > > the
> > > > Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then
> that
> > > > partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
> > > Trouble
> > > > is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on
> the
> > > > Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set
> of
> > > > startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where
> your
> > > > small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a
> > little
> > > > tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see
> your
> > Op
> > > > sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is
> sufficient
> > to
> > > > choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
> > > >
> > > > Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me
know
> if
> > > > that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires
a
> > > > trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then
> you
> > > > make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back
and
> > > delete
> > > > the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software
> used
> > to
> > > > do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary
> IDE
> > > > harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
> > > >
> > > > --
> > > > George Hester
> > > > _______________________________
> > > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > > >
> > > > > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
in
> > > > message
> > > > > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > > > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> > > > operating
> > > > > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second
> > harddrive.
> > > > All
> > > > > the
> > > > > > drives are formatted.
> > > > > > Thank You, Mike R.
> > > > >
> > > > > Simple:
> > > > >
> > > > > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > > > > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> > > > >
> > > > > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > > > > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > > > > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > > > > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > > > > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > > > > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
Anonymous
June 6, 2005 3:51:49 AM

Archived from groups: microsoft.public.win2000.general (More info?)

Well Pegasus I am doing it as we speak. In fact I do not even have an Operating System on my Primary IDE controller Master hard drive AND I am using the native Windows 2000 boot loader. What you mention those files yes they are on the Primary IDE controller on the Master hard drive. I explained that earlier. But no Operating system there. My operating system is on the Master hard drive of the Secondary IDE controller and is on C.

--
George Hester
_______________________________
"Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message news:eACIUhVaFHA.2124@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> You write "The Windows boot loader in Windows 2000 will
> do the same thing ie. allow Operating systems to reside on any
> partition on any IDE drive." I'm afraid this is incorrect. The
> Windows boot files (ntldr, ntdetect.com, boot.ini) must reside
> on the active partition of the primary master. They cannot reside
> on a slave drive, on a secondary disk or on a logical partition.
>
> "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:o YcnuVSaFHA.3488@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> The Windows boot loader in Windows 2000 will do the same thing ie. allow
> Operating systems to reside on any partition on any IDE drive. Yes the
> password protection is not supported in the Windows boot loader. I grant
> you that. All I know is that if you want Every OS installation to see
> itself on C a boot loader alone is not sufficient. And I don't think that
> is even possible if you want more than one install of an OS on the Master
> IDE drive of the Primary IDE channel. Put another way I have not yet
> figured out how to do it. I could do it with a 3rd party boot loader but
> not using the Windows boot loader.
>
> --
> George Hester
> _______________________________
> "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> news:#aY5FkKaFHA.3384@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > Try googling for these keywords:
> >
> > xosl download
> >
> > The Windows boot loader is a very basic boot loader - it simply
> > invokes the boot files of the chosen OS, all of which are usually
> > visible.
> >
> > Other boot loaders can do much more, e.g. switch partitions on
> > and off (i.e. hide them) as specified by the user. They can also
> > provide password protection for an OS, which is great in a
> > family environment where the kids keep wrecking their OS
> > while mom's OS (used for university studies) remains intact
> > and undisturbed.
> >
> > Lastly, some boot loaders allow you to do what most people
> > say is impossible: To load an OS on a logical drive on a slave
> > disk, complete with all boot files, and boot from it. This ability
> > overcomes the restriction of having no more than four OSs in a PC.
> >
> >
> > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > news:u6kvwmFaFHA.2212@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > Well I don't know anything about XOSL. Provide a link please? Either
> will
> > work I suppose. I just assummed if it was a boot loader then that is what
> > it was. I didn't know it would also allow the second install of Windows
> > 2000 to go on C. My understanding is that is not what a boot loader does
> so
> > I need to look at it.
> >
> > --
> > George Hester
> > _______________________________
> > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > news:elTNYLAaFHA.2308@TK2MSFTNGP14.phx.gbl...
> > > The point I tried to make to the OP was that he needs a
> > > third-party boot loader such as XOSL to make his
> > > OSs truly independent from each other. This involves
> > > running each OS off its own drive C:. Contrary to
> > > what you think, XOSL can do this. I have several
> > > installations to prove it.
> > >
> > > Furthermore, XOSL does not interfere with the boot
> > > sector of any OS. This means that you can easily boot
> > > into any OS without the help of XOSL - provided that
> > > you have some other tool to hide/unhide partitions and
> > > to mark them active/inactive. XOSL will do this for with
> > > a nice little menu.
> > > ======================
> > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > news:eviUiw$ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > It doesn't and I never said it did. He has a Windows 2000 installation
> on
> > > his Primary IDE Harddrive as Master. But he wants to install Windows
> 2000
> > on
> > > a harddrive that is NOT on the Primary IDE channel as Master. What I
> > > explained is how to do that and give that new installation the drive
> > letter
> > > C. And furthermore where it is NOT necessary to use a 3rd party boot
> > > loader. Remember a 3rd party boot loader alone will NOT provide the
> > second
> > > installation the oppurtunity to be on C.
> > >
> > > This is the configuration prior to installing the second OP sys.
> > >
> > > Master harddrive on Primary IDE Channel has two partitions:
> > > Part 1 (7MB) (blank) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> > > Part 2 (Windows 2000 original install) (NOT Active) (bootable)
> > >
> > > Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR harddrive using Secondary
> IDE
> > > connection.
> > > Part 1 (blank) (Active) (bootable)
> > >
> > > Getting this configuration is the crux of the matter. Now you are ready
> > to
> > > install Windows 2000 (2nd op sys).
> > >
> > > When you do that guess which partition will show as C in Windows 2000
> > Setup?
> > > Right the Part 1 on "Slave harddrive on Primary IDE connection OR
> > harddrive
> > > using Secondary IDE connection" because it is Active.
> > >
> > > Windows 2000 will balk at installing there. It tells you it needs a
> > > partition on the Master harddrive on the Primary IDE Channel to write a
> > > small set of Startup files to. You have that: Part 1 (7MB) (blank)
> > > (bootable).
> > >
> > > All done. Proceed with the Installation. Now both Windows 2000 see
> > > themselves on C; the native boot loader can be used to choose which op
> sys
> > > to boot; the second install takes care of everything for you by default.
> > > The only thing left is to set boot.ini to wait some time (ie. 15 secs)
> > > before doing the default. You will see boot.ini on that small
> partition.
> > >
> > > --
> > > George Hester
> > > _______________________________
> > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > news:uE80UJ8ZFHA.1412@TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...
> > > > I cannot see how your method can deliver two instances
> > > > of Windows, each on its own partition, each visible on
> > > > drive C: when active.
> > > >
> > > > If you can post a step-by-step procedure of how to achieve
> > > > the above then will try it out for myself. On the other hand,
> > > > if your method delivers OSs that are visible on two different
> > > > drive letters then there is no need to continue.
> > > >
> > > > =======================
> > > >
> > > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:ec83R35ZFHA.3620@TK2MSFTNGP09.phx.gbl...
> > > > Hii Pegasus. You do not have any Partitions active when you start the
> > > > install of Windows 2000 except the one you are goiing to install
> Windows
> > > > 2000 on. If it is not on the Primary IDE Channel harddrive then so be
> > it.
> > > > Windows 2000 setup will see that partition as C wherever it is.
> > > >
> > > > You switch between the two OSs when the native Windows 2000 boot
> loader
> > > > comes up. That is because the small partiton will be active when the
> > > > Windows 2000 Setup is done. Windows takes care of that.
> > > >
> > > > You do NOT hide the small boot partition. It is not necessary or
> > > relevant.
> > > > The ONLY active partition is the one you are going to put Windows 2000
> > on
> > > > before Windows 2000 setup. It's not active so not an issue.
> > > >
> > > > The boot loader (3rd party) I mention is one way to go I am not
> arguing
> > > with
> > > > that. I just was pointing out a 3rd party boot loader is not
> necessary.
> > > > Windows 2000 has one and it works. It will also see his other install
> > by
> > > > default of the new Windows 2000 setup. Everything will be good to go
> > > after
> > > > the new install.
> > > >
> > > > The small boot partion can be 7MB which is FAT12. The startup files
> > will
> > > > occupy about 500Kb. The same is true for Windows 2003 but because of
> > its
> > > > bug it needs the small boot partion to be over 25MB. Go figure!!!
> > > >
> > > > --
> > > > George Hester
> > > > _______________________________
> > > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > > news:o SMIXDzZFHA.1152@tk2msftngp13.phx.gbl...
> > > > > What you propose is an interesting approach to multi-booting.
> > > > > What you have not really explained is how you're going to
> > > > > switch between the two OSs, each of which must be visible on
> > > > > drive C:. You also did not say how you will hide the small
> > > > > boot partition. I have the tools to do it but does the OP have
> > > > > them?
> > > > >
> > > > > All of this is quite nicely and automatically handled by the
> > > > > boot loader I suggested. I'm aware, of course, that everyone
> > > > > has his preferences. When I'm given two equivalent choices
> > > > > then I will always go for the one that follows the KISS
> > > > > principle - that's why I mentioned XOSL.
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > "George Hester" <hesterloli@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> > > > > news:%23eE%23WZyZFHA.720@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > > > Not really. The Windows 2000 Boot loader is good enough. If you
> want
> > > the
> > > > > install on a drive that is not on the Primary IDE channel AND you
> want
> > > it
> > > > to
> > > > > be C then you need to make a small partition on the Primary Channel
> > > > > Harddrive 15MB is good enough for Windows 2000 (55MB for Windows
> 2003
> > is
> > > > > enough - in point of fact this is a bug in Windows 2003 - but who
> > > cares?)
> > > > at
> > > > > the beginning of the harddrive. Then when you are ready to install
> > the
> > > op
> > > > > sys and before you do, you have to make that partion on the other
> > drive
> > > > the
> > > > > Active Partition. That has to be the ONLY active partition. Then
> > that
> > > > > partition will show as C when you choose it in Winsdows 2000 Setup.
> > > > Trouble
> > > > > is Windows 2000 will not let you install there because it is not on
> > the
> > > > > Primary IDE channel. It will tell you it needs to write a small set
> > of
> > > > > startup files to the Primary IDE Channel harddrive. That is where
> > your
> > > > > small partition comes into play. You choose that. (This part is a
> > > little
> > > > > tricky flollowing the correct prompts) The install should also see
> > your
> > > Op
> > > > > sys you have now. The Boot Loader native to Windows 2000 is
> > sufficient
> > > to
> > > > > choose the particular op sys you want to boot.
> > > > >
> > > > > Now how are you going to do this partition manipulation? Let me
> know
> > if
> > > > > that is what you want to do I'll tell you how to do it. It requires
> a
> > > > > trick. You make an Active Partition on the Primary IDE drive. Then
> > you
> > > > > make the partion on the other harddrive Active. Then you go back
> and
> > > > delete
> > > > > the partion you made active on the Primary IDE harddrive. Software
> > used
> > > to
> > > > > do this will complain. Point is NO PARTITION at all on the Primary
> > IDE
> > > > > harddrive can be Active. Ignore it.
> > > > >
> > > > > --
> > > > > George Hester
> > > > > _______________________________
> > > > > "Pegasus (MVP)" <I.can@fly.com> wrote in message
> > > > > news:#Lo#ZikZFHA.2984@TK2MSFTNGP15.phx.gbl...
> > > > > >
> > > > > > "Testpilot Mike" <Testpilot Mike@discussions.microsoft.com> wrote
> in
> > > > > message
> > > > > > news:D 972E905-7353-4FF3-8C30-83B9A3C65E41@microsoft.com...
> > > > > > > I have three harddrives on my computer. One of the three has an
> > > > > operating
> > > > > > > system, win2K pro. How can I install win2K Pro on a second
> > > harddrive.
> > > > > All
> > > > > > the
> > > > > > > drives are formatted.
> > > > > > > Thank You, Mike R.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Simple:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > - Boot the machine with your Win2000 CD.
> > > > > > - Select the destination for the second Win2000 when prompted.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Note that the second copy of Win2000 will have a system drive
> > > > > > letter of D: or E:. This means that it must always run under that
> > > > > > drive letter. It therefore relies on the presence of drive C:. If
> > > > > > you want a truly modular multi-booting installation, with no
> > > > > > dependencies, then you must use a third-party boot manager,
> > > > > > e.g. XOSL (free!).
> > > > > >
> > > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > >
> > >
> > >
> >
> >
>
>
!