Reasons why you dont buy Prebuilt systems

We all have are list of reasons...just like to see what yours are =D
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More about reasons dont prebuilt systems
  1. Too much $$$$$$
  2. Big name parts, crappy assembly and miscellaneous parts like the cables, drivers used, power supply, DVD drive brands.

    They use big names for the parts most inexperienced builders look at, for example:
    Core 2 Duo 6400!
    7950GT 512 MB!
    2 gb DDR800!
    And then in fine print
    <i>Jose Gomez 600 watt power supply unit</i>

    And real builders think, "Hey what the... What brand is Jose Gomez?"

    There's also the incredibly bad customer service.
  3. what are you talking about jose gomez power supply ROXORZ!!!

    ...

    hahahahaha =) i agree
  4. There are a number of reasons why I don't buy a pre-built system any more. years ago, when 286 and 386 processor computers were being made by vendors, the dearth of vendors selling parts to individuals and the cost of the OS and other software made the equation balance on the side of pre-built. As time went on, more online vendors and computer shops opened up, and computer shows began going around the US. The small community of home-builders found they could buy the parts and pirate the software to make a computer cheaper than you could get from a manufacturer. Of course, of the majority of folks, relatively new to computers, it made sense to buy from a manufacturer so you could get their support when things went wrong (since as newbies we were generally lost when it came to what caused our sytems to malfunction.

    For the last decade at least when you factor cost of parts and software versus pre-built, it's cheaper to buy the parts and build it yourself. By the same token, many of us are a lot more familiar with parts and how easy it is, yet how frustratingly hard it can be when things go wrong, to put a machine together ourselves. I'm speaking of my own experience here.

    Basically I can build what I want without the extra unwanted bells and whistles you get with some manufacturers who customize software for their systems and load them with shovelware and trial software. I can focus on those parts that I want to be up to date and other parts where I don't care. For example, $5 now is a lot to spend on a floppy drive. Amazingly I remember when it cost $150 to get a replacement 3 1/2 inch floppy drive for a computer! I get the satisfaction that I put it together myself and it works. I can dress the cabling (or not) to my satisfaction. I can modify it any way I want because it won't void any warranty to the parts except the one I might modify.

    Finally, I like to put things together and see how they work. After all, motherboards have slots on them to put boards in them that do things. That is one thing that has really changed; most things that used to fill those slots are already on the motherboard now. It used to be you had a card for your hard drive and and floppy. You had a card for your phone modem. I remember having a game card that I hooked my joystick up to. This was pre-USB by a few years. Now you don't even need a sound card for the onbard sound is good enough for my purposes.
  5. Building it myself is too much fun. I'm not letting anyone else have the fun, it's mine! All mine!
  6. They all have there good points and bad points but I don't because the use of cheap substandard parts in the construction they might use a name brand motherboard but using crappy capacitors.
  7. Too much crapware, cheap no name parts, and limited upgrade options.
  8. 1. You don't have to suport 10,000 users...
    2. You like no warranty.
    3. You can afford for your system to be down for weeks at a time.
    4. And last, but not least, you think it will save you money!
  9. Don't get me started, I could go on for 5 pages. In a nut shell they are SH!T. I am specifically referring to the big ones e.g., Dell, HP & Gateway not the boutique high end builders.
  10. Here's some reasons to build your own.

    1. Cheaper

    2. You know the quality of the parts put into your system.

    3. You know that what you bought is what you put in. Sometimes, it can be ambiguous.

    4. I enjoy building systems myself. Its like legos.

    5. Your overclocking options are MUCH higher.

    6. Liquid cooling, peltiers and vapor phase compression.

    7. Its great not to have to pay for crap software or an installation of winblows.

    8. Upgrading is easy.

    9. Mods are easier.

    10. Someone come up with something, i'm spent...
  11. 10) You don't have to call India for tech support!
  12. Quote:
    1. You don't have to suport 10,000 users...
    2. You like no warranty.
    3. You can afford for your system to be down for weeks at a time.
    4. And last, but not least, you think it will save you money!

    1. Damn right I don't.
    2. All the parts I buy have some sort of warranty on them.
    3. Having it go down and take a couple of weeks to get parts and fix myself is more downtime than having to send it away to the builder for a couple of weeks... HOW?
    4. Maybe, maybe not. Depends on if I find good deals on parts or not. And, I don't pay a cent for labour.
  13. Quote:
    1. You don't have to suport 10,000 users...
    2. You like no warranty.
    3. You can afford for your system to be down for weeks at a time.
    4. And last, but not least, you think it will save you money!

    1. Damn right I don't.
    2. All the parts I buy have some sort of warranty on them.
    3. Having it go down and take a couple of weeks to get parts and fix myself is more downtime than having to send it away to the builder for a couple of weeks... HOW?
    4. Maybe, maybe not. Depends on if I find good deals on parts or not. And, I don't pay a cent for labour.


    1. Hell yeah!
    2. Hey why would I buy parts with no warranty?!? And besides if I get quality parts in the first place then warranty is just a bonus.
    3. With system builders, your system could be down for weeks. If you know what you're doing and experienced enough, the most time it'd be down is 2-3 days, and that already includes going to the shop if something needs replacement or buying something new.
    4. Spec-per-spec I've seen it time and time again, buying parts your self would be cheaper, unless of course you get higher quality parts than the parts they put in.
  14. Quote:
    We all have are list of reasons...just like to see what yours are =D



    More pleasure and fun in building my own.

    I know how its assembled and how well its assembled.

    I can trouble shoot easier because i know how it went together and where errors might occur

    No pre-loaded software.

    hell i'm looking to build my own laptop www.coboc.com

    But other than the shear fun and pleasure of building my own, i would buy my system from www.ibuypower.com
  15. I think it all really boils down to control. I build mine because I end up knowing EXACTLY what is in the system. I know the motherboard, the CPU, the ram (and the speeds) the PSU, everything. If I don't like something, I can buy something else BEFORE I spend any money. As others have said, I have complete control over what my system has.
  16. Reasons TO buy prebuilt systems:

    1. If you're looking for low-end, it is the way to go.
    2. You're a noob.
    3. More people buying OEMs would cut the stupid "rate my build" or "which CPU" or "Windows XP 64 vs XP Pro" thread counts in half.
    4. See number 2.
    5. If you are IT, or are buying for your small business.
    6. If you want a Mac (also see numbers 2 and 4).
  17. Quote:
    1. You don't have to suport 10,000 users...
    2. You like no warranty.
    3. You can afford for your system to be down for weeks at a time.
    4. And last, but not least, you think it will save you money!

    1. Damn right I don't.
    2. All the parts I buy have some sort of warranty on them.
    3. Having it go down and take a couple of weeks to get parts and fix myself is more downtime than having to send it away to the builder for a couple of weeks... HOW?
    4. Maybe, maybe not. Depends on if I find good deals on parts or not. And, I don't pay a cent for labour.

    Clearly you're not in IS because if so, the sysadmin in me would mock you mercilessly.

    But the consumer in me wants the ability to pick and choose which components I want to invest in and what I can skimp on.
  18. In college and my 20's, I built my own systems because I wanted the control of picking out each components and getting just what I wanted. Plus I enjoyed the bragging rights of being able to say I had built it.

    As I moved into my thirties, I bought prebuilt because life was busy and I didn't want the hastle of building it. If it performed 4% slower, who cares? Within 2 weeks something better will come out anyway...

    Now as I move into my 40's, I'm back to building my own mostly because I want to "get my hands dirty" and actually play around with the technology of it. Now that I've progressed into management at work and sit in meetings all day, it is good to see that I actually can still make the rubber hit the road. I also like being able to pick out a good looking case instead of one of the mass market ugly things you get from Dell and the others.
  19. Quote:
    Clearly you're not in IS because if so, the sysadmin in me would mock you mercilessly.

    But the consumer in me wants the ability to pick and choose which components I want to invest in and what I can skimp on.

    I would think that most people here are not administrators of a massive corporation's information systems, and, even if they are, are in these forums discussing building and customizing their own home systems, not thousands of machines in a corporate environment.

    As for me, there's Work-NotAPimecone, and there's Home-NotAPimecone.

    Work-NotAPimecone uses his computer at work to make web pages and web applications. He doesn't poke around inside his work computer. It's not his. As long as it works, he doesn't care. It's not Work-NotAPimecone's problem. Ususally Work-NotAPimecone saves his important files on a shared corporate server that is backed up to tape daily, by magical elves as far as he cares, rather than his own workstation anyway. Work-NotAPimecone does not like fixing computers.

    Home-NotAPimecone built his computer himself. He had a lot of fun researching and picking out components. He uses his computer at home to find porn, play games, download things, encode video, watch TV, and generally goof off and have fun. And, of course, to tinker and overclock. If it goes down, Home-NotAPimecone hooks up one of his old rigs and seeks advice in the Forumz and (if necessary) orders parts to fix it. If a hard drive gets fried, Home-NotAPimecone weeps for his lost porn, but rises from the ashes stronger than ever, ready to seek out new porn. Home-NotAPimecone's system is not used for anything critical. If it goes down, the only one who cares is Home-NotAPimecone, and he's got other systems he can limp by on until he gets it fixed. Home-NotAPimecone likes fixing computers.

    If Work-NotAPimecone meets Home-NotAPimecone, he will kill Home-NotAPimecone! Worlds will collide!
  20. Quote:
    10) You don't have to call India for tech support!


    hahahaha!!!

    I agree with all the points...pointed out so far.

    my first system was a pre built one...and oh boy was it bad...even though it looked good on paper.
  21. very crappy gfx cards :( (poor guys who buy those brand things with crappy power supplies and hardware stuff, thinking they got themselves a newgen gamemachine :lol: )
  22. Quote:
    Don't get me started, I could go on for 5 pages. In a nut shell they are SH!T. I am specifically referring to the big ones e.g., Dell, HP & Gateway not the boutique high end builders.


    Ditto. High end builders like overdrivePC - do custom cabling - better
    than most people - has a warranty - uses the best parts - the
    downside - you pay for it. -
  23. Most prebuild system's PSU will not handle any GPU upgrades for most of the time those GPU upgrade that only meet the PSU requirements end up destroy both the PSU and the motherboard. Prebuild systems PSU wont perform as stated is the main cause of this issue. This mainly is for the cheaper prebuilds and for the costly prebuilds its price. Prebuild system builders OEM OS's come with crap programs which usally my first reinstall I have no further need for or want on my fresh reinstall. 2 or more years down the road its hard to get bios upgrade if you get any bios upgrades at all. Good luck getting a bios upgrade for a quad core. Memory expandablity is one of the biggest problems. Emachine currently has a X2 3800 which only can hold 2GB's where I can order a mobo with up to 32GB's of expanablity for $55. They want your system to have a short life which forces you to come back and buy again. Warranty as the OEM's warranty for 1 year but retail parts have up to a lifetime warranty.
  24. Truer words have never been spoken.
  25. While I've never built a system from scratch, I've bought parts and upgraded machines so much that there's nothing original left except the disc drives. The next machine will probably be totally homebuilt, using only a case that I presently have.

    Reasons to buy a prebuilt?

    1. The kid at college needs a computer today, not in 2 or 3 weeks when you get all the parts together and actually build it. So its off to a store and saying, we'll take that one.

    2. A freak lightening storm fries every electrical appliance in the house and the insurance company will pay for a new computer, but not one that you build from parts. Yeah, that's happened to me.

    3. You just aren't that competent yet. You can replace parts here and there, but don't have the knowledge or confidence to build it yourself.

    4. You're lazy.

    5. You're rich and can afford something from Falcon, Alienware, or whatever your favorite company is.
  26. I haven't build mine yet but I'm preparing to start soon. The main reason I want to do it is because it looks like a challenge and I'm actually learning something and I haven't even [tried to] put it together yet. It's also fun to pretend that I know what I'm doing. I'm goddamn genius!
  27. Quote:
    I haven't build mine yet but I'm preparing to start soon. The main reason I want to do it is because it looks like a challenge and I'm actually learning something and I haven't even [tried to] put it together yet. It's also fun to pretend that I know what I'm doing. I'm goddamn genius!


    Well just a few tips:
    1. Never work in a carpeted area, or at least have a static grounding strap, or at the minimum touch your metal case before you touch any silicon in your pc.

    2. Never ever ever touch the bottom of the heatsink or the top cover of the processor as your fingers will leave a grease mark on it.

    3. Always have your trusty screwdriver around.

    4. The user's manual is meant to be read.

    Well goodluck with your build.
  28. amnotanoobie made good points.

    I want to emphasize his point 4. The manuals tell you things you can't tell from just looking at a part. The manual tells you things that if you do such and such it will destroy something. Manuals show you where things connect, what parts connect to what and lots of other information that I find is posted as questions on web boards all the time. The manual may be poorly written (a common occurrence) Errors may even be in the manual (occasionally happens) but at their worst, they are better than nothing at preventing noobie mistakes.
  29. Quote:
    I haven't build mine yet but I'm preparing to start soon. The main reason I want to do it is because it looks like a challenge and I'm actually learning something and I haven't even [tried to] put it together yet. It's also fun to pretend that I know what I'm doing. I'm goddamn genius!


    Well just a few tips:
    1. Never work in a carpeted area, or at least have a static grounding strap, or at the minimum touch your metal case before you touch any silicon in your pc.

    2. Never ever ever touch the bottom of the heatsink or the top cover of the processor as your fingers will leave a grease mark on it.

    3. Always have your trusty screwdriver around.

    4. The user's manual is meant to be read.

    Well goodluck with your build.

    3. Alway have your trusty magnetic screwdriver around.
    :lol:
  30. The market for Custom computers and prebuilt computers are separate.


    You guys are comparing apples to oranges here!

    (except for high $$$ like FNW)


    Budget prebuilt > budget build'ur'own
    Gaming prebuilt < gaming build'ur'own
    Media center >= media center build'ur'own.
  31. Quote:
    While I've never built a system from scratch, I've bought parts and upgraded machines so much that there's nothing original left except the disc drives. The next machine will probably be totally homebuilt, using only a case that I presently have.

    Reasons to buy a prebuilt?

    1. The kid at college needs a computer today, not in 2 or 3 weeks when you get all the parts together and actually build it. So its off to a store and saying, we'll take that one.

    2. A freak lightening storm fries every electrical appliance in the house and the insurance company will pay for a new computer, but not one that you build from parts. Yeah, that's happened to me.

    3. You just aren't that competent yet. You can replace parts here and there, but don't have the knowledge or confidence to build it yourself.

    4. You're lazy.

    5. You're rich and can afford something from Falcon, Alienware, or whatever your favorite company is.


    1. I would wait a few days and not buy it in a store, most local stores will charge a lot :D

    2. Oh man I hate insurance people, first of all they had to "Inspect" my old computer to make sure it was dead(they had some electronics people do it), then they tried to give us like 400 dollars saying you can buy a computer from dell for that much, and lastly when I got my hard drives back from my old computer back from the insurance people, I was wondering why my sata cables wouldn't go in, and I look in there and I immediatly saw the problem, there was a piece of a sata cable broken in it from where the dumb electronic people broke the cord in it, had to get a swiss army knife and pry it out.
  32. :oops: i like to touch the wires when the mains are on :oops:
  33. you wont go into liquidation invalidating any warranty you had paid for with the company (like my Multivision)
  34. Quote:
    Emachine currently has a X2 3800 which only can hold 2GB's where I can order a mobo with up to 32GB's of expanablity for $55. They want your system to have a short life which forces you to come back and buy again. Warranty as the OEM's warranty for 1 year but retail parts have up to a lifetime warranty.


    If you're a person (like my uncle) that was happy with an emachine in the first place its a great deal. He maybe uses the internet to play fantasy baseball on a dial up connection once or twice a week. So it's overkill and there will be no need to buy a new one until it literally dies.

    The prebuilt market is very different than the enthusiast or build your own computer market. And I think it is quite mis-leading and innacurate to say building your own system is cheaper. It is not cheaper but rather you gain a huge price vs. performance boost building your own system.

    In other words you can't build a system for $250 dollars. But you can buy a cheapo pre-built one for that price. Alternatively a $1500 dollar pre-built system won't stand a chance in performance against a well built home system. In any case here is how I see each market pre-built vs. enthusiast home built:

    Pre-built people IMO fit into these categories:

    1. People with little knowledge of computers.
    2. Non gaming crowd that just uses the internet to send emails and browse infrequently.
    3. People who care about cheapness in price, not in performance price gains. They look at the price tag and could care less about the guts after it runs internet explorer and office.
    4. People gullible enough to listen to a hollow sales pitch at an electronics store.

    Enthusiast home built systems people fit into these categories:

    1. At the very least have moderate knowledge of how a computer works.
    2. Gamers that care and notice when your computer is bottlenecked cause you bought a hell Dell.
    3. People that care about price vs. performance. Are willing to spend that extra $200 dollars on a good video card.
    4. Know their computer inside and out. And they care about what parts go inside.
    5. People that are heavy into video and audio encoding and care about their quality.
  35. I've used several OEM machines as well as built a couple myself. I prefer to build my own, here's why:

    1. Not very much flexibility in what you can get in most OEM systems. You can to some extent choose memory size (but not speed or DIMM configurations,) HDD size, and processor speed. That's about it.

    2. OEM boards' BIOSes are next to useless as they've had any configuration options except setting the system clock's time, whether or not you want to have the integrated LAN on or off, and whether or not you want to set a password stripped out. No fan speed controls, no CPU or memory controls- nothing. And you cannot flash the BIOS to allow things like newer CPUs to work for the most part.

    3. They tend to use a lot of nonstandard and expensive to replace parts instead of standard parts that you can pick up inexpensively anywhere. This is a rule on laptops but some things on desktops are also set up this way (some Dell PSUs had switched power leads to prevent a "commodity" PSU from working.)

    4. You not only have to buy yet another copy of Windows but OEMs are increasingly releasing PCs with just a recovery partition on the HDD. HDD die? You're screwed, now go pay $300 for a retail copy of Windows. And to make matters worse, that recovery partition is chock-full of 25 trialware apps that you are forced to install when you reinstall Windows.

    5. OEMs largely only build super-stripped budget machines and "media center" computers. They occasionally build gaming machines, but they're not really very good to tell the truth and are very overpriced. If you want something not in those 3 categories like a home file server or a slick mini-HTPC, you're either out of luck or going to pay some boutique shop a 100% premium to make you one.

    6. With the exception of budget computers, you generally will do better financially building your own. This is even more true of you want a high-end system and *exceptionally* true if you want a workstation or server as those are "commercial" units with a significant markup for the parts and a HUGE premium for service contracts and vendor certifications that are useless for somebody who's not using it in a large business.

    All of the above are by-products of vendors trying to sell largely turn-key "solutions" to people and make a decent margin despite fierce competition. If you usage does not fit into a nice little category, then you are not very well-served by the OEMs. Sure a boutique dealer will build a computer to exactly suit your needs, but it's exactly the same unit you could have built yourself, except now it costs a lot more. That's why I will almost always build by own machine.
  36. OOOOO, I wanna play!

    Reason not to buy prebuilt: I was pricing out a pc on Dell yesterday just for kicks. You can "upgrade" to a GeForce 7950GT for $650 more. Are you sh!tt!ng me?

    Reason to build your own: my girl thinks i'm pretty damn BRILLIANT to be able to build my own machine. so I can say, it gets me more action. hahaha!
  37. Quote:
    Clearly you're not in IS because if so, the sysadmin in me would mock you mercilessly.

    But the consumer in me wants the ability to pick and choose which components I want to invest in and what I can skimp on.

    I would think that most people here are not administrators of a massive corporation's information systems, and, even if they are, are in these forums discussing building and customizing their own home systems, not thousands of machines in a corporate environment.

    As for me, there's Work-NotAPimecone, and there's Home-NotAPimecone.

    Work-NotAPimecone uses his computer at work to make web pages and web applications. He doesn't poke around inside his work computer. It's not his. As long as it works, he doesn't care. It's not Work-NotAPimecone's problem. Ususally Work-NotAPimecone saves his important files on a shared corporate server that is backed up to tape daily, by magical elves as far as he cares, rather than his own workstation anyway. Work-NotAPimecone does not like fixing computers.

    Home-NotAPimecone built his computer himself. He had a lot of fun researching and picking out components. He uses his computer at home to find porn, play games, download things, encode video, watch TV, and generally goof off and have fun. And, of course, to tinker and overclock. If it goes down, Home-NotAPimecone hooks up one of his old rigs and seeks advice in the Forumz and (if necessary) orders parts to fix it. If a hard drive gets fried, Home-NotAPimecone weeps for his lost porn, but rises from the ashes stronger than ever, ready to seek out new porn. Home-NotAPimecone's system is not used for anything critical. If it goes down, the only one who cares is Home-NotAPimecone, and he's got other systems he can limp by on until he gets it fixed. Home-NotAPimecone likes fixing computers.

    If Work-NotAPimecone meets Home-NotAPimecone, he will kill Home-NotAPimecone! Worlds will collide!
    Well said. I work in IT, and I would never think of suggesting that we build our own PCs. It would bu ludicrous. However, at home I would never think of buying a HP... it would be ludicrous.
  38. 1. Too expensive for what you get. Too expensive period.
    2. Not upgradable.
    3. It seems to be more economical to do it yourself. I built my first system after purchasing a Digital computer. I forget how long I used the Digital before I looked into upgrading it and scraped the computer.
    4. To prove that a retired woman with no computer experience could do it. I did rely on technical support at first. I also have quite a collection of parts. I don't build high-end computers and I did build two systems for people I know who cannot afford to buy computers themselves.
    5. Building systems is fun, even if problems present themselves.
    6. It is fun to build upgraded computers.
  39. Yeah, but if you have the kind of girl that building PCs turns on, you probably don't WANT to get more action.
  40. Quote:

    1. The kid at college needs a computer today, not in 2 or 3 weeks when you get all the parts together and actually build it. So its off to a store and saying, we'll take that one.

    2. A freak lightening storm fries every electrical appliance in the house and the insurance company will pay for a new computer, but not one that you build from parts. Yeah, that's happened to me.


    1. I would wait a few days and not buy it in a store, most local stores will charge a lot :D

    2. Oh man I hate insurance people, first of all they had to "Inspect" my old computer to make sure it was dead(they had some electronics people do it), then they tried to give us like 400 dollars saying you can buy a computer from dell for that much, and lastly when I got my hard drives back from my old computer back from the insurance people, I was wondering why my sata cables wouldn't go in, and I look in there and I immediatly saw the problem, there was a piece of a sata cable broken in it from where the dumb electronic people broke the cord in it, had to get a swiss army knife and pry it out.

    On #1, like I wrote, the kid needed a computer now, not in a few days. College classes and professors don't listen to excuses that they should put everything on hold while the student and/or his parent finds the parts and builds a computer. It was a thousand dollars, but the computer has lasted 3 years, so it wasn't all that expensive on a per year basis.

    #2. Well, what can be said about insurance people? At least I got to keep the old Alienware case and it will be the basis for my next computer build. Oh yes, it is not the new, spacy looking case, but a good, well built case.
  41. DIY

    Pros:

    25-75% cheaper that pre-built
    Fun
    Great Overcolck Options
    Customizable PC

    Cons:

    Can be frustrating
    No warranty if you buy parts that are incompatable
    Not the thing to do if you have no tech Exp.


    Pre-Built

    Pros:

    Usually comes with lots of software and an OS pre-installed
    Easy option if you have little tech Exp.
    Warranty

    Cons:

    Little Overclocking options
    Not very customizable
    Expensive

    Just my 2 cents :wink:
  42. Exactly.


    Even MS Office is only a 120day trial in most cases.

    Though a Prebuillt system is still the BEST option if you just want a cheap, get things done computer.

    For $200 you can get a computer that will last, and do everything but games within the last 3-4 years.
  43. Quote:
    Well said. I work in IT, and I would never think of suggesting that we build our own PCs. It would be ludicrous.

    I don't know .... Google builds (some of) their own PCs/servers and it seems to be working out OK for them. :wink:

    -john
  44. I work at a company with 50,000+ computers and we build about 1% of them from the ground up.... thats still alot of computers.
  45. The only reason I ended up doing own build was because when I had my pre-build, I was googling for a how-to and ended up getting information overload. I learned more than I needed to. When I needed to upgrade I figured I could do it myself. And I did.
  46. i dont buy prebuilt computers (from PC-World mainly) simpley cause they charge things like..

    £1500 -
    FX60 processor (good start i guess)
    1gig ram.... no idea on speed or make, ask staff... "its 1gig ram".. mm thanks.
    geforce 7600gt graphics (arnt they less then £100 now?)
    300gb 7,200rpm hard drive.... Staff: what make?... "its a 300gb hard drive & i beleive its 7,200rpm, so ull get faster loading times"
    plus ull usually find when the PC arrives the motherboard is maxed out & very little can be done to upgrade it (thus needing a new motherboard to upgrade the thing)

    anyone can build a PC with highend, high quality parts, exactly the way they want it for £1000 & it will run circles around that PC-World jobby.


    also i personally prefer building since if something ever goes wrong i generally know the thing inside out & have little or no problems repairing it.
  47. Um, yeah, I thought you owned a company that SOLD computers. :?:
  48. Quote:
    1gig ram.... no idea on speed or make, ask staff... "its 1gig ram".. mm thanks.


    Quote:
    300gb 7,200rpm hard drive.... Staff: what make?... "its a 300gb hard drive & i beleive its 7,200rpm, so ull get faster loading times"


    Lol :trophy: <-- for the best humor of the day.

    This resonates with me, because some tech tried to sell me a 7200 rpm drive telling me it was the faster drive in make and I said, "What about scussie drives?" and he said, "This is 7200 rpm." JUST LIKE THE GUITARIST IN SPINAL TAP: "This one goes to 11..." LOL. FUHCKING techs.
    -cm
  49. I have always had problems with more problems with storebought computers than the ones I built myself. At least if something goes wrong I really only have myself to blame
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